Kindle Price: $9.89

Save $6.11 (38%)

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Flip to back Flip to front
Audible Narration Playing... Paused   You are listening to a sample of the Audible narration for this Kindle book.
Learn more

Get the Free Kindle App

Enter email or phone number to get a link

Processing your request...

The Last Magazine: A Novel Kindle Edition

112 customer reviews

See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$9.89

Length: 338 pages Word Wise: Enabled
Audible Narration
Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration with Whispersync for Voice. Add narration for a reduced price of $4.49 when you buy the Kindle book.
Audible Narration: Ready

Kindle Daily Deals
Kindle Delivers: Daily Deals
Subscribe to find out about each day's Kindle Daily Deals for adults and young readers. Learn more (U.S. customers only)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

The promise of this remarkable novel will never be fulfilled because it is that saddest of literary phenomena—the brilliant but posthumous first novel. Hastings, former Rolling Stone journalist and author of the memoir I Lost My Love in Baghdad (2008), was killed when his automobile crashed in June 2013. Here, in an apparently completed novel found in Hastings’ files after his death, the protagonist “Michael Hastings” is an intern at The Magazine, a newsweekly, and author Hastings has keen and considerable insight into the functioning of a Time-like periodical between 2002 and 2005, Iraq to Katrina. War reporter A. E. Peoria, who has been to Iraq (and elsewhere) for the magazine and is equal parts Neil Sheehan and Hunter Thompson, is the novel’s focus. The scenes of war are graphic and horrifying, and those of sex every bit as graphic and pretty horrifying themselves. Peoria has read his Conrad and Graham Greene, and Hastings, the novelist, reminds one at times of the early Robert Stone. There is an interesting twist, although with its development, the book jumps the tracks a bit. Nonetheless, this is powerful, sharp, often funny, and very compelling reading. --Mark Levine

Review

“Even from the grave Mr. Hastings has demonstrated anew an ability to reframe the debate. The novel….reads as vivid archaeology that reveals much about the present moment… The milieu of the book paints a picture of a treehouse where like minds connive and look for an opening. But far below them, there is the sound of sawing – steady and implacable. The tree will fall….Remarkable.”—David Carr, The New York Times

“Scathing, funny, rollicking.”—The Barnes and Noble Review

“Frenetic and darkly funny.” – Rolling Stone

“Terrifyingly funny ….entrancing, compelling.” – Shelf Awareness

The Last Magazine is tender and brutal, worldly and inbred, high-minded and gross, smartly rendered and rough around the edges — and quite often hilarious…The Last Magazine is the funniest, most savage takedown of the American news media since Fear and Loathing: On the Campaign Trail ’72, by his hero Hunter S. Thompson.”—James Rosen, The Washington Post

 “[The Last Magazine] is fast and funny and humane. When I put it down, it called to be picked up again.” –Dwight Garner, The New York Times

“What makes this novel work—really, I can’t think of a better little tome to take to the beach—is that it’s just so much fun, so wicked, so amusing, and so brilliantly observed. The caricatures of people living and dead (career-wise) are only part of its charm. I haven’t read a better send-up of hackery since the last time I dove into Evelyn Waugh’s 1938 classic Scoop.”—Christopher Dickey, The Daily Beast

“As a provocative piece of thinly fictionalized nonfiction, [The Last Magazine] is a posthumous mission accomplished…Hastings’s book is a message in a bottle that has belatedly washed up on shore to force us to remember how we landed where we are now.”—Frank Rich, New York Magazine

“That voice. That witty, subversive voice we thought we'd lost, is back for one last romp. Hastings decodes the culture even more incisively in fiction, with wild bursts of imaginative mischief. So damn funny.”—Dave Cullen, New York Times bestselling author of Columbine

“[Hastings’] keen eye for the creatures of the New York media universe focuses on the fabricated lifestyles of that world's desperate inhabitants. Here, no one is immune….The suffering amid the insufferable is comic gold, and Hastings had no time for heroes. The world he created is filled with lost boys stamping their feet for validation. This could be the perfect summer bro comedy. Paging Judd Apatow!”—Mark Guarino, Chicago Tribune
 
“A convincing account of the perils of war - and of the journalistic wars of an institution under siege from New Media…. The Last Magazine remains a loving account of a profession Hastings believed was honorable and tried to honor. Only the guilty have something to fear.” –Paul Wilner, San Francisco Chronicle
 
“Surely Michael Hastings would have savored the taste of revenge had he lived to see his first novel, The Last Magazine published…The humor throughout is searing….entertaining.”—Sherryl Connelly, New York Daily News

The promise of this remarkable novel will never be fulfilled because it is that saddest of literary phenomena—the brilliant but posthumous first novel. Hastings, former Rolling Stone journalist and author of the memoir I Lost My Love in Baghdad (2008), was killed when his automobile crashed in June 2013. Here, in an apparently completed novel found in Hastings’ files after his death, the protagonist “Michael Hastings” is an intern at The Magazine, a newsweekly, and author Hastings has keen and considerable insight into the functioning of a Time-like periodical between 2002 and 2005, Iraq to Katrina. War reporter A. E. Peoria, who has been to Iraq (and elsewhere) for the magazine and is equal parts Neil Sheehan and Hunter Thompson, is the novel’s focus. The scenes of war are graphic and horrifying, and those of sex every bit as graphic and pretty horrifying themselves. Peoria has read his Conrad and Graham Greene, and Hastings, the novelist, reminds one at times of the early Robert Stone. There is an interesting twist, although with its development, the book jumps the tracks a bit. Nonetheless, this is powerful, sharp, often funny, and very compelling reading.
Booklist

Hastings (The Operators, 2012, etc.) was one hell of a journalist, covering wars and geopolitical strife for venues like Rolling Stone and BuzzFeed. As it turns out, he would have made a fine novelist had he not died in a car accident in 2013. This “secret” novel was resurrected from his files by his widow, Elise Jordan; it’s a messy, caustic and very funny satire. His protagonist is a young journalist also named Mike Hastings, who has just landed his first job at The Magazine in the dying days of traditional journalism. In wry metacommentary scattered throughout the text, the character Mike—who claims he's the one writing this book—reflects on just what it is he's writing. "Maybe I'm talking genres, and maybe the genre is corporate betrayal," he says. "Including the big decision that the entire media world is so interested in: Who and what is left standing?" Hastings, the author, tells the story of how Mike makes the journey from ambitious young man to cynical hack partially by showing us Mike's new friend A.E. Peoria, a classic old-school journalist who fuels his brilliant war reporting with alcohol and drugs and transvestite hookers. In the crevasse between his sanitary cubicle and Peoria’s lewd adventures, our hero is also tracking the war of career strategy between his managing editor, Sanders Berman, and the international editor, Nishant Patel, whose favor Mike is carefully currying. Hastings chooses the start of the Iraq War to disrupt Mike's burgeoning career path. "There's war in the backdrop, looming and distant and not real for most of these characters, myself included," Mike says. In a way, the book reflects Hastings' career arc, from unpaid intern at Newsweek to becoming one of the essential war correspondents of his generation. A ribald comedy about doing time in the trenches and the bitter choices that integrity demands.
--Kirkus

 

Product Details

  • File Size: 1545 KB
  • Print Length: 338 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0399169946
  • Publisher: Plume; Reprint edition (June 17, 2014)
  • Publication Date: June 17, 2014
  • Sold by: Penguin Group (USA) LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00G3L7TRM
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #170,418 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


More About the Author



Michael Hastings was a contributing editor to Rolling Stone and a correspondent at large for BuzzFeed. Before that he worked for Newsweek, where he rose to prominence covering the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. He was the recipient of the 2010 George Polk Award for his Rolling Stone magazine story "The Runaway General." Hastings was the author of critically praised three books: I Lost My Love in Baghdad: A Modern War Story, Panic 2012: The Sublime and Terrifying Inside Story of Obama's Last Campaign and the New York Times bestseller The Operators: The Wild and Terrifying Inside Story of America's War in Afghanistan, which was optioned for film by Brad Pitt's Plan B Productions. In 2010, he was named one of Huffington Post's Game Changers of the year. In 2009, his story Obama's War, published in GQ, was selected for the Best American Political Writing 2009 anthology. Hastings died in 2013, and was posthumously honored with the Norman Mailer Award for Emerging Journalist. His novel The Last Magazine (Blue Rider Press) will be released on June 17, 2014.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

61 of 66 people found the following review helpful By Barry Eisler on June 17, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
When Michael Hastings died at 33, almost exactly a year ago, everyone who followed his work knew the world had lost one of its most fearless, uncompromising journalists.

What we didn’t know was that we had lost an outstanding novelist, as well.

The Last Magazine is so many things: a horrifying and hilarious parody; a you-are-there corporate thriller; a strange and touching love story. Most of all, it’s a gripping bildungsroman (always wanted to break that word out in a review, and I couldn’t have asked for a better opportunity). Hastings nails it all: the confusion and terror of combat; the funhouse-distorted ambivalence of sexual addiction; the grubby machinations of office politics in the corridors of a major weekly news magazine. The shallowness, the self-centeredness, the soullessness of the crabs-in-a-barrel culture Hastings deftly and scathingly depicts reminded me of the dark comedy In The Loop — these are people whose only care about the world catching fire is whether their profiles will be attractively lit by the flames.

If you've read The Operators: The Wild and Terrifying Inside Story of America’s War in Afghanistan, you know that part of what always set Hastings apart was his voice (at times in The Operators he almost seems to be channeling James Elroy). That voice informs everything he does in The Last Magazine, including a wonderful series of breaking-the-fourth-wall “interludes” such as, “Why I Write” (the narrator — or is it the author?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
28 of 31 people found the following review helpful By NSW TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 17, 2014
Format: Hardcover
Michael Hastings' gift as a journalist was his utter disregard for the "access" that seems to primarily motivate his peers - in much of his writings, Hastings never crossed a bridge where he wasn't trailing gasoline. In his most well-known book, "The Operators," he used the military embed system to savage the staff of Gen. Stanley McChrystal (not the general himself) who thought he was just another journalist who would go along to get along.

In this supposedly fictional account, the "character" of Michael Hastings takes to task the top bosses at "The Magazine" of the title. With minimal research, you can find out who inspired the characters of Nishant Patel, Sander Berman and Timothy Grove. I originally thought the character of AE Peoria was meant to stand in as a grown-up version of Hastings himself, but it turns out he was inspired by a real person as well (he's the strangest, but in a backward way, the most complimentary portrayal).

In the novel, these men - and to the narrative's discredit, they're all men - are venal people. Presented in the lead-up and beginning of the Iraq invasion, they bend over backwards to justify their support of the mainstream pro-war position, then backpedal as things fall apart - while never taking responsibility for selling the war in the first place. So - fictional for the book, but directly inspired by real events and actions.

The book will - and should be - polarizing. It goes off the rails toward the end with some bizarre sexual couplings and coincedences that seem the sort of thing that gets written in a throw-it-at-the-wall first draft, but is long edited out by a final version. However, since this novel was basically discovered in a desk drawer, we'll take what we can get.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Irene on June 19, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
To the surprise of many, Michael Hastings' widow, Elise Jordan, discovered the manuscript on his computer after he died in an explosive car crash in L.A. almost one year ago exactly. A dynamic journalist known for not pulling his punches, Hastings was controversial figure almost eager to take on powerful figures, most notably General Stanley McChrystal.

The Last Magazine documents his searing and raw take on the industry in which he thrived, set against the backdrop of the Iraq invasion. When protagonist Michael Hastings finally transitions from unpaid intern to temporary research assistant, his optimism and passion for the industry can only foreshadow a coming of age. Because the main character and the author share the same name, the reader spends much of the book wondering how Michael Hastings the protagonist will evolve into the journalist we knew. Enter the cast of characters based loosely on real personalities: veteran foreign correspondent A.E. Peoria (an older version of author Hastings?), collected international edition editor Nishant Patel, Southern managing editor Sander Berman, and hot-headed digital publication editor Timothy Grove. What a shame that character development takes a backseat to juicy details of corrupt events, but alas.

Down the magazine media rabbit hole we go and into a tale of the rise and fall of public favor, betrayals all-too-commonplace, and a strange love story. Although the coincidences that drive the plot seem too well-placed, I forgive many of the novel's sins because of its unedited, brutally honest origins. Instead, I found myself addicted as the the real life events create a shocking turn of events at The Magazine, culminating in a bizarre yet fitting finale.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in