The Last Man and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$17.09
Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.99
  • Save: $0.90 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Last Man has been added to your Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $5.28
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Last Man Paperback – November 1, 2013

ISBN-13: 978-1466336575 ISBN-10: 1466336579

Buy New
Price: $17.09
3 New from $17.09 3 Used from $32.11
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$17.09
$17.09 $32.11
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

The Last Man + Belinda (Oxford World's Classics)
Price for both: $30.71

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 290 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (November 1, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1466336579
  • ISBN-13: 978-1466336575
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.5 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,612,966 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Morton D. Paley is Professor of English at the University of California, Berkeley. He is co-editor of Blake: An Illustrated Quarterly.

Customer Reviews

One of the most boring novels I ever read.
Balthasar
The book just went on too long to really enjoy.
Amazon Customer
Way too much description of unrelated material.
Greg H

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Underground Crafter on December 23, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
I'll admit that as a fan of post-apocalyptic novels, I went into this book with certain expectations since I knew that it was about the last man alive on earth. Instead, I encountered a book which is mostly a debate about the purpose of man, love, art, and other "big ideas."

Most modern books of this sort spend 10 pages on life "before" and the remainder of the book on adjusting to life "after." Shelley uses the opposite approach in The Last Man, and the majority of the book takes place before a mysterious plague begins to destroy the fabric of civilization. Shelley's writing is beautiful and intelligent, and her characters are highly idealized - but no more so than you would expect in a book that is presented as the memoirs of the last man alive on earth.

I think the best way for the modern reader to approach this book is with an open mind. At the beginning, I was constantly looking for clues and signs of some impending doom, and Shelley does nearly everything possible to prevent the reader from foreseeing when and how things will begin to come apart. I would recommend trusting in her ability as an author and just giving yourself over to this book. That's what I did after a few chapters, and I was pleasantly surprised by the twists and turns. Shelley focuses entirely on the human drama with little attention to the science behind the plague. She herself was the lone survivor of her group of friends and she outlived most of her children, and I think you can feel her pain and loneliness in the narrator, Verney.

This book is beautifully written and the characters debate some of the major philosophical issues of the time (of all times, perhaps). While the subject itself is melancholy, Shelley is protective of her readers and spares us most of the grim details.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Ben Uziel on January 3, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This may be Mary Shelley's forgotten treasure. The first post-apocolyptic novel, her victorian style is not suited to the dis topic reality she conjures. Mostly you feel the emotions of isolation, loneliness and powerlessness, an emotional backdrop that stemmed from the loss of both her child and beloved husband in real life.

This novel has the classical use of the modern English language with the romantic values of its age, yet with vision employed within the post-modern themes of existence, humanity and moral critique all within the expanse of human extinction. A paradoxical universe that see's not only the clash within personality within the human drama, but stylistically between the romanticist and the rationalist literature. It is compelling, and in a way timeless, for the genre it presaged. I recommend
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition
“The last day passed thus: each moment contained eternity; although when hour after hour had gone by, I wondered at the quick flight of time. Yet even now I had not drunk the bitter potion to the dregs; I was not yet persuaded of my loss; I did not yet feel in every pulsation in every nerve , in every thought that I remained alone of my race, — that I was the LAST MAN.”

Verney tells the story of his life. Through mistakes of his father, he and his sister, Perdita, are cast out of a happy life into one of poor lonely orphans. He forms a plan of vengeance against the people who brought this ruin. The main culprit was the king, who is dead. When the king’s son, Adrian, comes to Verney’s town he sets his plan in motion. However, Adrian turns out to be a great supporter of Verney’s late father. Verney rises from his life of despair and longing with the help of Adrian, who becomes his lifelong best friend. This circle of six friends: Verney, Perdita, Adrian a poet and intellectual , Raymond a hero nobleman (who marries Perdita) , Adrian’s sister, Idris (who marries Verney) and Evadne, a Greek princess, have many ups and downs in their lives . Eventually, most end up married with children and quite happy and settled. But Perdita’s husband, Raymond, cheats on her with Evadne. So Perdita leaves Raymond. A war between the Greeks and the Turks break out and Raymond fights in it as does Evadne. She dies on the battlefield and Verney finds her body and buries her. As Raymond is on his death bed form mortal war wounds, Perdita goes to him and forgives him. When he dies, she kills herself.

Soon after this an epidemic begins. It’s unknown what causes it or how it spreads. It goes from country to country. England is still untouched by it.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I feel like a literary trash talker in this moment. Hopefully Shelley will forgive me. Yes, I love literature and really like contemporary post-apocalyptic stories as well. It is my weakness, that and spicy dark chocolate. However, I could not find a way to read and enjoy this book. It was terribly disturbing as, obviously, Shelley is a well regarded fiction writer. I may try to return to the book in the future and see if my taste has matured (or something like that). You, however, may love this book. Happy reading~*
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By grant18 on February 21, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Mary Shelley isn't known for writing much other than Frankenstein but, in my opinion, this should be called her masterpiece. Picture Candide without the absurdity but with consummate usage & grammar.

As a 69-year old who spends most of his time "resting," my present life was summed up perfectly near the end of the novel: “I have lived. I have spent days and nights of festivity; I have joined in ambitious hopes, and exulted in victory: now,—shut the door on the world, and build high the wall that is to separate me from the troubled scene enacted within its precincts. Let us live for each other and for happiness; let us seek peace in our dear home, near the inland murmur of streams, and the gracious waving of trees, the beauteous vesture of earth, and sublime pageantry of the skies. Let us leave ‘life,’ that we may live.”

And most of all, don't read this novel expecting a happy ending.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?