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The Last Manchu: The Autobiography of Henry Pu Yi, Last Emperor of China Paperback – March 1, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing (March 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1602397325
  • ISBN-13: 978-1602397323
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.6 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #607,641 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Henry Pu Yi is more commonly known as “the last emperor.” He lived in Beijing, Manchuria, and Siberia before becoming an ordinary citizen of the People’s Republic of China. He died in 1967.

Paul Kramer (1915–2008) was a naval officer and a secret service agent. He acquired and edited Henry Pu Yi’s autobiography in 1965 after learning about it from Chinese American friends.

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Customer Reviews

Too slow not to pass on.
Chilli B
Overall a good book and a fairly easy read.
Maui Swimmer
Entertainment and history lessons in one.
WILLIAM H HOFFMAN

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Maui Swimmer on September 11, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A very interesting story, especially if you have an interest in China history. The movie, "The Last Emperor" covers the book pretty well, so if you have just a passing interest in this subject stick with the movie and save yourself the time. But the book is much more detailed (as they usually are) and so provides many interesting side notes not covered in the movie. As to Henry Pu Yi, it is hard to know whether to pity him or despise him more. Certainly both emotions come out when reading the book. He was for the most part a very unpleasant man, totally self-center and uncaring those about him, and seemingly consumed with fear about his own death. He allowed himself to be used by the Japanese to further his own future. But it may be argued that all of this behavior was a result of his upbringing where he was the total center of attention since age 2. Overall a good book and a fairly easy read.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Chilli B on January 11, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Paul Kramer's efforts to bring Pu Yi's words to the West are to be commended; however, by the time we get into Pu Yi's account of his multiple mothers (which would be Chapter Three), the typos begin to confuse the story. Is the woman who caused his biological mother's suicide Than Kang or Tuan Kang? The "h" and "u" switch throughout the chapter making you wonder if there is sixth mother somewhere.

As interesting as some of the accounts are, I have not been able to stay with it beyond the Imperial Palace because Pu Yi's depth of perception is disturbingly short. When his second wife Wen Hsiu asks for a divorce, he records it as an event, but we have no sense of her before that account beyond the fact that she felt some competition being number two when it came to how much she could get in material things. Pu Yi writes he was too worried about regaining his throne to be a good husband to any wife. Granted. But in his account, Wen Hsiu died in 1950 and never remarried. According to Wiki, she lived until 1953 and remarried in 1947, a Major Liu. Although Pu Yi admits he has no idea what happened to her after she left him, he has left those two notes for posterity. Who has the truth? Presumably Wiki, and that tells us how little of Pu Yi's accounts outside of his own circle can be relied upon.

The man had an incredible life, and survived against all odds, so he should be interesting -- but he isn't. This account, approved by the Communists (so perhaps ultimately a propaganda piece), shows someone spoilt and incapable of learning from experience. He appears to feel nothing about his mother's suicide beyond the fact that it got the witchy Than Kang or Tuan Kang off his back. He has nothing but contempt for his father.
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22 of 31 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 23, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book is a must read for anyone interested in Chinese history. The book covers practically all aspects of the life of Aisin Gioro Pu Yi from his brief period on the dragon throne to being a "reformed" man in Peking in the 1960's. A tragic figure, his story is fully told.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Syoam on October 20, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
My interest (in part) was stimulated: Viewing film The Last Emperor
several years ago and travel to China (just returned) with my Family. I was
intrigued by the Title of this Book. Very easy to read. Worth your time
reading if you too are a novice to China's past OR if you are just interested
in reading historical many first/second person accounts. Reading it filled in many
gaps in my understanding of China's Imperial System of governing which became
very turbulent prior WW2. I ENJOYED "The Last Manchu".
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A. McNeil on November 29, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This autobiography traces the unique life of Henry Pu Yi, the last emperor of China, from when he first ascended the throne at 2 years 10 months of age, through his time in hiding, to his time puppet ruling Manchukuo for the Japanese in WWII, to his thought reform under the communists.

The first 3/4 of the book will make you very angry at Pu Yi. He is incredibly self-centered with all of his focus being on his own continued life and continuing imperialism in China. He not once thinks of the good of the Chinese citizens, let alone those in his own household. He even routinely beats them and sees nothing wrong with this. It takes thought reform under the communist Chinese for him to see his flawed character and false perception of the world. Although the translator calls this time-period his "brain washing," I think that is a biased view. Pu Yi never once recalls being tortured or dehumanized by the communists. He is put in a cell with others, forced to take care of himself for the first time in his life, shown he is not above others simply because of who his parents were. He reads and studies communism and comes to regret how he treated those beneath him when he was emperor and afterward. He comes to see flaws in his character and simply wants to find a career and contribute to China. This transformation is fascinating and makes the read worth it, although I do believe this autobiography will mainly only appeal to those with an interest in Chinese history.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I found this very interesting, but definitely sad. China has been such a great country for thousands of years. It was fascinating to read a first hand account of Henry Pu Yi's life.
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