The Last Mountain 2011 PG CC

Amazon Instant Video

(19) IMDb 7.4/10

The fight for the last great mountain in America's Appalachian heartland pits the mining giant that wants to explode it to extract the coal within, against the community fighting to preserve the mountain and build a wind farm on its ridges instead. With Bobby Kennedy Jr. enlisted as a passionate force for preserving Coal River Mountain and the economic power of the fossil fuel industry twisting democracy to its advantage THE LAST MOUNTAIN highlights a battle for the future of energy that affects us all.

Starring:
Robert Kennedy Jr.
Runtime:
1 hour 36 minutes

The Last Mountain

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Product Details

Genres International, Documentary
Director Bill Haney
Starring Robert Kennedy Jr.
Supporting actors Ron Burris, Barbara Bush, George W. Bush, Jenna Bush, Joseph Byron, Antrim Caskey, Devra Lee Davis, Joshua Graupera, Gary Gump, Maria Gunnoe, Jennifer Hall-Massey, Allen Hershkowitz, Lisa Jackson, Robert Kennedy Jr., Joe Lovett, Joe Manchin III, Nick Martin, Chuck Nelson
Studio Docurama FIlms
MPAA rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 3-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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See all 19 customer reviews
This film deserves to be seen and by a much wider audience!
John Hoving
This is a must-see movie for anyone who cares about public health, ordinary people, climate change, and the environment.
P. Karsh
It covers land destruction, water and air pollution as well as climate change very well.
C. Marchand

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By John Hoving on November 1, 2011
Format: DVD
I'm honestly not a big fan of documentaries but this one was certainly an exception and I highly recommend your seeing this.

Knowing little about the subject before seeing the film I watched with great fascination this moving true story about a communities struggle to save a mountain in Appalachia.

In the end I found I had been been given an introduction to the consequences of this nations consistently destructive environmental policies that allow corporate polluters to get away with destroying entire communities and wreaking havoc with natural resources that belong to the public.

This film deserves to be seen and by a much wider audience! People should see what these Coal polluting companies are doing to our environment and once they do I 'm sure they'll understand why they should all be just shut down and advocate this nation moving toward a more efficient energy policy, and one that does not destroy entire landscapes.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Andrew on January 5, 2012
Format: DVD
I live in East Tennessee, not far from the site of the coal ash spill of recent. I had heard of what goes on up in the mountains, but I hadn't seen much of it (thankfully we have the National Park). This is a beautifully executed documentary that shines light on the evils of what is going on. It could have been a political bashing, but it wasn't. It was a story about people who are often cast out of society because of lack of education and a pervading social stigma that they aren't as good as the rest; however, one of the most powerful men in America practically lived with these people. Robert Kennedy Jr. shed light on an inconvenient truth: the coal companies aren't bringing wealth to Appalachian, they are draining it. The turning point for me is when Mr. Kennedy says to a top coal man that if they are bringing so much prosperity to West Virginia, why is it one of the poorest states in the country?
Overall, this is a wonderful, shining documentary. Thank you Mr. Kennedy.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Shannon L. Yarbrough VINE VOICE on April 2, 2012
Format: DVD
The Last Mountain is a documentary about mountain top coal mining in the Appalachian mountains and the effects it has not only on the environment, but on the small communities that call those mountains home. Boosted by the support of environmental lawyer Robert Kennedy Jr., the people affected share their stories and their anger toward the mining companies that are destroying their homes and livelihood.

Though the movie is very anti-coal in general, I found it to be very eye opening to large cooperation greed. Massey Energy is the guilty one here, led by a money hungry CEO who fed the wallets of local and White House politicians to overlook all of the policy and codes they were breaking. Unfortunately, there is an inner battle within these mountain valley towns because they are extremely poor and most of the jobs are in coal mining. But Massey banned unions so they could pay lower wages and have slowly been eliminating massive numbers of jobs and replacing those workers with "more efficient" machinery. Not to mention the horribly low amount of taxes they pay to these communities.

But the townsfolk have worked the mines for generations; they think it is their honor and they do not see the true disservice their own employer is doing to them and their families. While they battle each other, their neighbors are dying (6 deaths from brain tumors in one town caused by polluted well water), their air is not clean to breathe, their communities are disappearing (the piece about one ghost town with just two people left living in it was heart wrenching), and their mountains are disappearing too.

Kennedy says it best in the film, "My kids wake up and have to breathe bad air today because some company paid a politician a whole bunch of money.
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Format: DVD
Bill Haney's provocative documentary "The Last Mountain" takes a very pronounced stand against coal mining in general and the destruction of the Appalachian Mountain region specifically. It's a vitally important topic in terms of environmental studies that has long range repercussions in the worlds of politics and big business, and it has been an on-going debate for as many years as I can remember. I have probably seen two dozen films or television projects about the dangers of Mountain Top Removal mining and the irresponsibility of those that have performed it. With only one range left unsullied, "The Last Mountain" chronicles the fight of the local West Virginia residents and outside environmentalists and activists against the coal conglomerates. It is a very angry documentary, well constructed if decidedly one-sided, that is relentlessly bleak for most of its running time. Health concerns, mining disasters, pollution, damage to property, community destruction--there is a veritable onslaught of catastrophes that the inhabitants of local communities have endured. It isn't until the last third of the film, however, that an alternate solution and energy proposal is introduced. I wish that it had been brought up earlier in the film to shed some light to the darkness.

The locals and the movie have a real champion in Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. Kennedy has been in this fight quite some time and is a worthy celebrity advocate. It is fascinating to see him go into debate mode with protesting coal supporters. I can see why Haney wanted to include Kennedy as much as possible to help raise awareness of the issues and to heighten the profile of the documentary. It is a sound decision that actually backfires a bit.
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