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The Last Odd Day Paperback – April 26, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 186 pages
  • Publisher: HarperSanFrancisco; 1st edition (April 26, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060750596
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060750596
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 5.3 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,073,045 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Swoops and soars with...quirky humor, compelling characters, and a lyricism so powerful it can take your breath away.” (Penelope J. Stokes, author of Circle of Grace)

“[A] thoughtful, wise exploration...a story that beautifully and poignantly traces the defining moments of one extraordinary woman’s life.” (Pamela Duncan, author of Plant Life and Moon Women)

“A poignant and lyrical novel....” (-- --Guy Johnson, author of Standing at the Scratch Line)

“Hinton paints a loving portrait of the unlikely yet inevitable friendship between two remarkable women...a sweet and soulful gem.” (--Kathi Kamen Goldmark, author of And My Shoes Keep Walking Back to You)

About the Author

A retreat leader and writing teacher, Lynne Hinton is the author of numerous novels including Pie Town, Wedding Cake, Christmas Cake, Friendship Cake, Hope Springs, and Forever Friends. She also writes a mystery series under the name Jackie Lynn. She lives in New Mexico.


More About the Author

A retreat leader and writing teacher, Lynne Hinton is the author of numerous novels including Pie Town, Wedding Cake, Christmas Cake, Friendship Cake, Hope Springs, and Forever Friends. She also writes a mystery series under the name Jackie Lynn. She lives in New Mexico.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By FaithfulReader.com on June 27, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Fans of Lynne Hinton's previous novels will find her new book, THE LAST ODD DAY, odd indeed. Deriving its title from November 19, 1999 (11.19.1999), the "last odd day" until 3111, it is a quiet, rambling account of an older blue-collar woman coping with her husband's long-term care and her own long-term memories; it is more novella than novel and more a meditation than a narrative. However, while Jean Clover's story may not have the dramatic action or symbolic cohesion of Hinton's earlier work, it is nonetheless a lovely story replete with messages of faith, hope and charity.
The basic facts: Jean, daughter of a Cherokee woman and a blind white man, grows up poor and marries O.T., who almost immediately goes off to fight in World War II, leaving Jean home on the farm with his parents and brother. For many years, nothing much happens: O.T. works, Jean keeps house, and any disappointments either of them feel are either ignored or accepted --- until the day Jean learns that the child she has carried nearly to term has died in utero. After the grueling and gruesome experience of laboring in childbirth without a baby to take home, Jean runs away to a motel for a month, filling her room with infant clothes, toys, and paraphernalia until returning home quietly and carrying on as if nothing had happened.
The years pass, and the couple carry on as if nothing ever will happen --- until the day when O.T. is felled by a stroke and winds up in a nursing home at half his former size and with less than half of his former faculties. Jean visits and cares for him faithfully, and during one of her regular bedside stays, she learns from a caregiver that her husband has had another visitor. Jean's encounter with that person will change both of their lives.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Angela on February 15, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Once in a while a book comes along that just fits perfectly into one's life for that particular moment. The Last Odd Day is certainly that book for me right now. Even the clever title, which notes that the date 11-19-99 is the "last odd day" until the next millennium, leads the reader to be assured that he is in for an amazing journey navigated by a very brilliant mind.

The story tells of Jean, who is half Cherokee half white. She notes the last days spent with her husband O.T. who is slipping through her fingers following a losing battle with a stroke. Jean visits O.T. in the nursing home before he passes away and learns that a mysterious woman has been visiting him as well. Jean finds out about a stunning secret her husband of 57 years has been hiding and while struggling to deal with the details of it, learns a lot about herself. She begins to reevaluate her life and the marriage she was a part of.

Lynne Hinton makes usage of the most vivid imagery allowing the reader to actually see and smell the sights and foods she is describing. From the house where she grew up in the woods to the apple pie with ice cream that she shares with a newfound friend. Through detailed descriptions of the setting in which Jean grew up compared with the life she now leads, the reader is taken on a trip from her childhood home in the Smokies to a beach where she is able to allow herself some personal time. From words of wisdom passed to her by her Grandma Cedar to advice from her nosy neighbor, Maude, Jean discovers new friendships and answers about her life that she has been struggling with her whole life.

The characterization that Hinton brings to the story allows the reader to clearly see into and actual feel the emotional rollercoaster in which Jean is riding.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By mamareadssomuch on June 17, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This novel was nothing like Hinton's previous books; the writing was good but really didn't feel like a novel - more like a long essay on one woman's discovery of her husband's secret.
Jean Witherspoon's husband dies and she comes to deal with the secret and her life without her husband. The story is one big narrative and I was glad when it was finished.
I have so enjoyed Hinton's other books ~ this was a different turn for the author - more of a ramble to me.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tonya Speelman VINE VOICE on May 6, 2007
Format: Paperback
There is a clear message inside. Have to read the whole book to find out though. This is a quick, easy read about a woman who was born to a Indian woman and white blind man. She meets her husband O.T. whom is in a nursing home and eventually passes. While he is in the nursing home, a nurse says that she is glad their daughter gets to come visit.

What you will find out is who is the daughter visiting and where did she come from since they were never able to have children. They had one girl, Emma and she passed as a baby. This book is about the spirit of a person and is enjoyable.

At times, was hard to follow with the flashbacks etc. Enjoyable though!
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