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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Australian Perspective!
After reading The Last Thylacine and developing such empathy with the main character and tasmanian tigers, I realised why I couldn't put this book down. Terry has captured the true australian spirit most of us feel in our hearts by conveying our love for our native animals and our vast areas of untouched natural beauty.

Terry has written a great paced adventure...
Published on January 27, 2006 by Big Rick

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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A different reviewers viewpoint
Look; maybe it's just me or something, or maybe the other reviewers are seeing something I'm not, but I felt that this book was rather poor to be honest. Yes, the prospect behind it is interesting (which I honestly feel is half the reason people are reviewing it so well, but I digress). Sure there are a few interesting moments, but that's not enough to carry the...
Published on March 12, 2012 by Dana Lawrence


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Australian Perspective!, January 27, 2006
This review is from: The Last Thylacine (Paperback)
After reading The Last Thylacine and developing such empathy with the main character and tasmanian tigers, I realised why I couldn't put this book down. Terry has captured the true australian spirit most of us feel in our hearts by conveying our love for our native animals and our vast areas of untouched natural beauty.

Terry has written a great paced adventure novel and very cleverly found a way to give readers an; Australian natural history, flora and fauna, photography and aircraft lesson all in one. I myself even learnt some things about Australian mammals.

I have lived in Australia for my whole life (26 years) and can safely say I have not until now felt the need so strongly to visit Tasmania and explore this part of the world!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars LONG LIVE THE LAST THYLACINE, June 4, 2009
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This review is from: The Last Thylacine (Paperback)
"The Last Thylacine" by Terry Domico is a great "what if" type of novel that involves a popular but little known subject matter especially, within the United States. In this cleverly orchestrated story line, "Matthew Clark" (field biologist) heads an expedition into the wilds of Tasmania in hopes of locating and capturing the extinct (or, thought to be extinct) Thylacine or..."Tasmanian Tiger". The promised pay-offs are in the millions of dollars and the prospects of success...superb.

However, the seeds of Matthew's training and love of nature soon sprout conflict within his soul and the battle between capitalistic gain and conservationism began their relentless salvos against one another.

This story conjures up images of "Gorillas in the Mist" (Jane Goodall), the movie, "Hatari" (John Wayne), Tom Clancy's "Rainbow Six", and even perhaps, the ghostly images of Jurassic Park and even... the Rainbow Warrior incident.

Terry Domico has given the reader a fun and interesting read. Perhaps someday, someone like... Matthew Clark will come along and dispel the notion that "Benjamin" was the last living Thylacine to pass away at the Hobart zoo in 1936.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars May there be Thylacines!, September 9, 2005
By 
Cat Bordhi (San Juan islands, Washington) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Last Thylacine (Paperback)
This can't-put-down novel contains a number of compelling elements I have never encountered anywhere before, from detailed descriptions of remote Tasmanian wilderness, to remote photo-capture techniques, to an engaging and well-arranged plot involving a Tasmanian creature, the Thylacine (sometimes referred to as the Tasmanian Tiger), which may or may not be extinct. Imagine a collie-sized marsupial with a kangaroo-like tail, short legs, mesmerizing eyes, and stripes across its haunches that make it look like an aboriginal drawing rather than a real animal. And the marsupial pouch that the female carries her young in is aimed to the rear, so brush won't catch on the opening or hurt her babies as she travels forward! After you read this novel, you will feel as if you have spent days with this creature, and in your mind and heart at least, it will not be extinct.

Although I am not drawn to action novels, this one includes some unusual scenes I thoroughly enjoyed, including a flying maneuver which tricks air traffic controllers into thinking that a plane has landed when it actually hasn't, and a complex rescue strategy so deftly crafted that with luck, it would actually work.

But what I liked best of all were the scenes in the Tasmanian wilds, which the author, a well-known and well-published wildlife biologist and photographer, writes about from first-hand knowledge. His descriptions of unique landscapes like the "Walls of Jerusalum", which is barricaded by high rocky cliffs, and of wildlife and plants, are haunting and primal. Part of the plot revolves around the Tasmanian government's desire to attract more people to the island, and I suspect that if this novel is widely read that nature-loving tourism will indeed increase. I'd like to go!

I live in the woods, with deer outside my windows, who sometimes gaze in at me. As I was reading THE LAST THYLACINE, the deer seemed strangely Thylacine-like, which I cannot explain. It was as the untouched, wild creature which is the subject of this novel were gazing in at me through the eyes of another wild animal. And so I feel as if this creature is not extinct, and I truly hope it is not.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best novel about Tasmanian Tigers that I have read, August 22, 2007
This review is from: The Last Thylacine (Paperback)
The Last Thylacine is a well written and engaging story. The characters are believable and the plot is engaging. Basically it involves a man who sees a Tas. Tiger and make a report. This leads to the loss of his job. He then organizes an effort to find proof of the Tas. Tiger's continued existence. His associates are interesting and there are many plot twists that are unique and well done. The book includes a glossary of "Aussie" terms to help in understanding the dialogue. I did not need to refer to that section, but it would be helpful for some who are not familiar with some of the slang from downunder.

Overall the book is a good read and to say more about the plot and outsmoe would be to spoil your reading. So just enjoy this book, and let us all hope that it is not The Last Thylacine.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars VIDEO REVIEW: The Last Thylacine: Riveting, haunting, brilliant!, July 9, 2013
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This review is from: The Last Thylacine (Paperback)
Length:: 1:30 Mins

Chances are, you have seen the footage yourself. This grainy black-and-white footage, shot in an Australian zoo, shows the last known specimen of the Thylacine, or Tasmanian tiger, to ever live. Benjamin, the now famous thylacine, died on 7 September, 1933.

In the 1980's, when no "confirmed" sightings were seen for 50 years, the animal was ruled officially "extinct". And yet, over 3,800 sightings have been registered on file by the Australian Rare Fauna Research Association. While footage, tracks, and physical evidence abound, the thylacine remains a creature of legend...

...

The Last Thylacine is a riveting book about several researcher's hunt for, you guessed it, what is presumed to be the last living thylacine in the outback of Tasmania. And the book is positively brilliant! The characters are believable, interesting, sympathetic, and realistic. The plot moves fast (for the most part - more on this later) and is filled with twists and turns. Get ready for a twist ending that will blow you off your feet, and one of the most haunting final passages ever written. Truly poignant.

The descriptions of Tasmanian outback is absolutely beautiful, and the passages about camp life are extremely realistic (and this is coming from someone who knows his wilderness survival). Terry Domico clearly knows his stuff!

What I liked about The Last Thylacine was the mix of page-turning action and the more serious material and drama. The book is a fine mix of page-turner, action, thriller, drama, character study, alternate history, wilderness guide, camping trips, and a beautiful arm-chair tour of Tasmania - one of the world's last untouched wildernesses.

CONS: the cons are few, and really don't make a large difference. Perhaps the book was a bit too long, and, while I found it really cool, some readers may be put off by long descriptions of landscape, technology, and camp life. The book goes through several different tonal stages, and not wholly seamlessly. But on the whole, they are mere trifles.

The Last Thylacine is an amazing adventure/survival/thriller/drama about an amazing and fascinating topic. It's very realistic, but that doesn't stop it from being fun. It's long, but you will be entertained every step of the way. And the ending is worth it all many times over!

I for one hope that Benjamin was NOT the last thylacine to ever live. I like to think that out there, out in the misty moors, steaming forests, rocky mountains, and crystal creeks of Northern Tasmania, a thylacine lurks. But the real question is, should it be found by man?

Strong Recommendation! 4.6 Stars! If you liked this review, please click the "helpful" button below, and read my other reviews!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A different reviewers viewpoint, March 12, 2012
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This review is from: The Last Thylacine (Paperback)
Look; maybe it's just me or something, or maybe the other reviewers are seeing something I'm not, but I felt that this book was rather poor to be honest. Yes, the prospect behind it is interesting (which I honestly feel is half the reason people are reviewing it so well, but I digress). Sure there are a few interesting moments, but that's not enough to carry the book.

It's short, coming in at less than 300 pages. In the shortness, a lot of parts seem greatly rushed. Honestly a good tenth or so of the book is devoted just to camera locations and setup, which would be fine and well if it was a book for photographers or something along those lines, but it's not. Characters seem to be a paradox of sorts, doing complete 180's at the drop of a hat. Also there's at LEAST 2 or 3 parts where a good page or two, even three maybe, is devoted to someone slipping and falling down some sort of rockface or other, and it quickly felt more like a gimmick than anything. A good portion of the writing seems almost "insincere" if you will, which is something which a book with an environmentally leaning premise should not be. It's also pretty forgettable. In trying to come up with enough stuff to review on, I'm finding it hard to remember enough to comment on, which is not a good sign.

Look, I wanted to like this book I really did. It's quite hard for someone outside of Australia to find thylacine-related merchandise of any sort (outside of Ebay perhaps), and I'm one of the people who feels that they are still out there somewhere. I was totally rooting for this to be a good book, it's something that in theory should have been right up my alley. But it just wasn't, and I honestly can not see how the other reviewers on here can be so positive about it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exciting Tasmanian Tale, September 1, 2005
By 
Arlen J. Erickson (Bainbridge Island, WA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Last Thylacine (Paperback)
I found this little book to be a real spellbinder, a carefully crafted story that left me believing that it might be true or I hoped it to be true. Anyone who is drawn to nature and to nature lovers will find this a compelling read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars living an adventure...., October 7, 2005
This review is from: The Last Thylacine (Paperback)
THE LAST THYLACINE is a fast moving, action-packed outdoors/adventure/thriller. It is also a thought provoking study of man in nature, as well as a reflection on the nature of man. Drawing on his experiences as field biologist, ecologist, writer, and photographer, Terry Domico shares authentic information about field research and exotic animal trafficking as he guides us through natural and human landscapes, tracking the forces that shape and determine survival in both.

What I particularly enjoyed about this book was the author's ability to reveal the feel and inner nature of a character or place with a poetical economy of words. I forgot I was reading and lived the story. Truly great read!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Highly recommended for the reader with an interest in nature and wildlife, March 10, 2006
This review is from: The Last Thylacine (Paperback)
The Last Thylacine by Terry Domico is a gripping tale of Matthew Clark who, upon claiming he has a supposedly extinct and especially mysterious animal (the Thylacine) is fired from his job for such a frivolous assertion. The Last Thylacine brings thrill-seeking readers a sufficient read, as Matthew eludes and conquers the many dangerous encounters throughout this enthralling story. Highly recommended for the reader with an interest in nature and wildlife. The Last Thylacine is a surely invigorating read for all.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Good Read, October 2, 2005
By 
R. Demar (Sacramento, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Last Thylacine (Paperback)
The Last Thylacine, Terry Domico's first novel, is a good read combining an abundance of action with interesting facts about the land downunder. Based on a fascinating Australian critter, it takes the reader on a throughly enjoyable trip outback, and offers a thoughtful examination of Man's greed and his responsibility to Nature. I look forward to his next story.
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The Last Thylacine
The Last Thylacine by Terry Domico (Paperback - August 1, 2005)
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