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The Last Truck: Closing of a GM Plant


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Product Details

  • Directors: Steven Bognar and Julia Reichert
  • Producers: Steven Bognar and Julia Reichert
  • Format: NTSC
  • Region: All Regions
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: HBO
  • DVD Release Date: April 6, 2010
  • Run Time: 40 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B003ES5P3C
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #187,816 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The Last Truck: Closing of a GM Plant" on IMDb

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Editorial Reviews

Documentary focuses on the workers of the General Motors Assembly Plant in Moraine, Ohio - which opened in 1981, and churned out an average of 280,000 small trucks and SUVs a year - from the announcement a year ago that the Plant will be closing, to its last day on December 23, 2008, just two days before Christmas. While the workers are shocked that they will be losing their jobs, we quickly see they are also losing much more: the pride they share in their work, the camaraderie built through the years, and the shared concerns about what their collective futures will hold. As the major industry in Moraine closes its doors for good, many see its demise as an indication of the changing American manufacturing landscape, which seems to be dying as products are increasingly being made elsewhere. The film offers a snapshot of a moment in America where we may be seeing the end of the blue-collar middle class.

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Customer Reviews

Great film Very moving!
Coffee Lover
We have this knowledge in our bodies, our bones and muscle, our eyes, ears, heart, lungs, skin, fingers, knees and definitely our feet.
John Lewis
Great for an economics or business class, as well as current events.
stephannfrance

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By John Lewis on April 2, 2010
Format: DVD
A different tale of love and loss
FILM REVIEW

By Martha Grevatt

Published Apr 1, 2010 8:49 PM
"The Last Truck: The Closing of a GM Plant" was shown March 26 at the Cleveland International Film Festival. The 2009 film portrays, through autoworkers' eyes, the process leading up to the closing of a General Motors assembly plant in Moraine, Ohio.

This writer participated in a panel discussion which included directors Julia Reichert (director of the 1976 classic, "Union Maids") and Steve Bognar, plus laid-off Moraine workers Kim, Darlene and Chuck. My plant, the Chrysler stamping plant in Twinsburg, Ohio, is scheduled to cease production in June and has been bought by Maynards, the same liquidator that will be auctioning the building and contents of Moraine Assembly.

For me, an autoworker for 22 years whose plant will close in a matter of months, "The Last Truck" was a powerful, eloquent and brutally realistic artistic statement.

I saw workers like myself who first learned -- not from GM but from the news media -- that their plant would be shuttered for good two days before Christmas, 2008. They talked about how hard they worked and how much it changed their lives to acquire a good-paying union job. They expressed their love for their coworkers -- their "family" -- a love that cut across lines of race, nationality, religion and sex and, by suggestion, sexual orientation. I felt proud when these union sisters and brothers challenged the near-unanimous chorus of news commentators who insisted the financial woes of the auto industry were "all the union's fault."

The film depicted people like us -- me and Kim and Darlene and Chuck -- people with the knowledge of all that goes into producing an automobile.
Read more ›
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Guenter Kramer on June 30, 2012
Format: DVD
The movie shows the production of the last truck in the GM Moraine assembly plant from the viewpoint of several plant employees. The film and its plant worker's stories and comments are empathetic, honest and emotionally moving while the protagonists come across as very friendly, likable, and down-to-earth and hardworking people. They could have continued talking for hours and it still would have been fascinating and thrilling to listen. Yet, the movie in its short run of just about 40 minutes lacks the historical background of the plant as well as an outline of how mismanagement, misinterpretation, and misjudgments especially from GM CEO Rick Wagoner led to GMs downfall and the closing of so many plants. It would also have been beneficiary to have interviewed plant managers and supervisors for their opinions as a counterbalance to the workers views. The movie sucks the viewer right in; it entertains despite the sad and destructive subject. Moreover, it raises many questions and could easily have run for 100 minutes or longer. It sparks interest in the subject of managing automobile and parts plants and makes the viewer wonder why the legions of highly (over-) paid managers and leaders still couldn't prevent these hardships from happening.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Marcus E. Sharpe on August 19, 2011
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I teach a course at a community college on Psychology in the Workplace and used this film as a way to demonstrate the impact the economy has had on not just the American automotive industry, but also on the folks behind all those vehicles being manufactured. There were few dry eyes in the room as the film came to a close...
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By W. D. Berry on December 9, 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I met the producers of the film. they and others was around the outside the gates for days getting stories from the employees. that and people one the inside of the plant. the producers of the film decided to remove all of the politics from the documentary.

it showed the employees for what they were: people-ones that built a vehicle that they all believed in, a lot of the employees had at home. yes, I worked at the plant. yes, I owned (not leased) 4 different trailblazers over the years of my employment at the plant. I am proud of every person that I met there. I am proud of the friends that I made there. I am proud of every truck that my friends and me produced there.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Laura Lea Evans on August 9, 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video
This is a thoughtful documentary and thought provoking. How many of us really think about a plant closing and what the people who work there are going through on the last days? It just an abstract for most of us, a piece of brief news, but for the GM employees shown in this film, it was a very emotional time. I came away from watching the documentary with new respect for those who work in the auto industry. Their smiles and the pride that they had in their jobs was self evident. Seeing everyone gather in the plant as the last truck was ready to roll off of the assembly line really put the human aspect into the picture. Well worth watching and memorable. There is no rancor in the story line towards GM either. Just a telling of the closing of this plant and how it affects everyone who works there as well as in the town itself. Excellent and engrossing.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By stephannfrance on October 5, 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Great look inside the lives of people who are caught in a horrible recession. Gives a face to the thousands who have recently lost their jobs. Easy to relate to and empathize with the characters. Great for an economics or business class, as well as current events.
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