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The Laws of Disruption: Harnessing the New Forces that Govern Life and Business in the Digital Age [Kindle Edition]

Larry Downes
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)

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Book Description

While digital life races ahead, the rest of our life, from law to business, struggles to keep up. Business strategists, lawyers, judges, regulators, and consumers have all been left behind, scratching their heads, frantically trying to figure out what they can and can’t do. Some want to bring innovation to a standstill (or at least to slow it down) through lawsuits and regulation so they can catch their breath. Others forge madly ahead, legal consequences be damned.

In The Laws of Disruption, Larry Downes, author of the best-selling Unleashing the Killer App, provides an invaluable guide for these confusing times, exploring nine critical areas in which technology is dramatically rewriting the rules of business and life.

The Laws of Disruption will help business owners and managers understand not only how to avoid being blindsided by customer rebellion, but also how to benefit from it. It will teach lawyers, judges, and regulators when to keep their hands off the system and it will show consumers the consequences of their digital actions.

In the gap created by the Law of Disruption, golden opportunities await those who move quickly.


Editorial Reviews

Review

Andrew Lippman, Director of the Digital Life program at the MIT Media Lab
“Larry Downes’ Laws of Disruption is important reading for all of us. It provides valuable guidance for confronting innovations and reacting to them with vision and responsibility, and eye-opening examples of the failures that result when we don't.”

Paul F. Nunes, Executive Research Fellow, Accenture Institute for High Performance

“There is no one better than Larry Downes to explain to us the complicated interaction between law and digital life, and what it all means for business. In The Laws of Disruption, Downes brings to life how industrial age law is leaving today’s companies in the lurch, and how tomorrow’s businesses and business leaders will usher in a new age of lawful innovation, content creation, and content ownership, one that will deliver meaningful rights to companies and ordinary citizens alike. Ignorance of the law is no excuse—not knowing the Law of Disruption in today’s rapidly digitizing world could prove fatal.”

Dan’l Lewin, Corporate Vice President, Microsoft Corporation

“The convergence of information and communications technology is fundamentally disruptive—we’ve known this for a long time. Downes’ model helps clarify where, and how, to pay attention.”

David Hornik, General Partner, August Capital

The Laws of Disruption is a must read for entrepreneurs. Many of the most interesting venture backed technology companies to emerge in the last decade (e.g. Google, Skype, YouTube, Facebook) have been products of the Laws of Disruption. Larry Downes’ book may well serve as the guide to my next great investments.”

Tim Wu, Professor of Law, Columbia University and co-author, Who Controls the Internet?
“Critical reading if you want to understand the last ten years—and be ready for the next ten.”

The Conference Board Review
“Downes offers a guided tour of what’s happening and what’s next, what’s legal and what’s not, and how all of it is likely to impact individuals and businesses. Laced with examples of how conflicts and shifts are playing out in real life, the book looks beyond typical strategic advice, offering a fresh and valuable perspective.”

Wall Street Journal, October 13, 2009
“The Internet is our own era's big disrupter. We already know how it has changed our habits and ways of doing things. Mr. Downes says that its long-term effects on society will be even greater. . . .there is no doubt that a lot more disruption lies ahead.”

Financial Times, November 7, 2009
“. . . Downes eloquently expresses the problems that many industries face and shows how using old laws to maintain the status quo is futile. The digital revolution is here and we will make sense of it – somehow.”

About the Author

Larry Downes is a noted expert on information technology, strategy, and law. He is a partner with the Bell-Mason Group, a consulting firm focused on corporate innovation and venturing, and is a nonresident fellow at the Stanford Law School Center for Internet & Society. He has written for a variety of publications including the Harvard Business Review and USA Today. He lives in Kensington, California.

 

Product Details

  • File Size: 530 KB
  • Print Length: 306 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0465018645
  • Publisher: Basic Books (October 13, 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0465019986
  • ISBN-13: 978-0465019984
  • ASIN: B002Q18206
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #716,332 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
"The Laws of Disruption" is the closest thing you will find to a genuine cyber-libertarian manifesto these days. But Downes isn't a rigid ideologue; his skepticism of government regulation of the high-tech economy is based more on practical considerations and the fundamental law of disruption: "technology changes exponentially, but social, economic, and legal systems change incrementally." Downes says this law is "a simple but unavoidable principle of modern life" and that it will have profound implications for the way businesses, government, and culture evolve going forward. "As the gap between the old world and the new gets wider," he argues, "conflicts between social, economic, political, and legal systems" will intensify and "nothing can stop the chaos that will follow." In this sense, "The Laws of Disruption" reads like an addendum to one of Alvin Toffler's old books on technology and futurism in that Downes is essentially walking us through the practical consequences of life in a "post-industrial society."

In terms of what it all means for public policy, Downes doesn't so much fear legal and regulatory over-reach the way many cyber-libertarians do. Rather, he thinks most regulatory schemes just won't work. In essence, he is a technological fatalist or consequentialist: Progress happens whether we like it or not, so get used to it! Thus, the "laws of disruption" he articulates serve primarily as "Just-Don't-Bother" warnings to over-eager government meddlers. "The best way to regulate innovation is to leave it alone," he counsels.

In terms of structure, The Laws of Disruption resembles "Blown to Bits: Your Life, Liberty, and Happiness After the Digital Explosion" by Abelson, Ledeen, and Lewis.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The nature and extent of killer execution January 12, 2010
Format:Hardcover
Larry Downes is the co-author with Chunka Mui of Unleashing the Killer App: Digital Strategies for Market Dominance 2000), in which they provide a brilliant analysis of how "a new good or service that establishes an entirely new category [can] by being first, dominate it, returning several hundred percent on the initial investment." As they explain, the primary forces at work in spawning today's "killer apps" are both technological and economic in nature. "The technology we are concerned with is the transformation of information into digital form, where it can be manipulated by computers and transmitted by networks." Digital strategies are needed to achieve market dominance. They suggest several, each worthy of careful consideration. For me, this book has two great values: It helps us to understand what a "killer app" is and can accomplish; also, for those lacking a "killer app" and without much chance of possessing one, it suggests how to increase and enhance the appeal of what one does have, such as it is. Given a choice, of course, anyone would prefer to have a "killer app" when proceeding into an uncertain future. Lacking one, there are still opportunities to recognize...and to pursue. Most companies will not dominate but can survive if committed to the appropriate strategies. For them and their leaders, this book could well be the difference between life and death.

In The Laws of Disruption, Downes asserts that there are three laws of digital life. Together, they comprise "the laws of disruption."

Moore's Law: In an article published in 1965, Gordon Moore (the founder of Intel) claimed that the number of transistors on his company's chips would double every year or two without increasing their cost to users.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover
Business strategist Larry Downes, author of Unleashing the Killer App, is much more specific than most authors about how digital technologies are changing the world - and why technology will advance even more and have more impact. While he addresses numerous issues that have received lots of attention already, Downes also looks beyond the headlines and the obvious implications of digital technology to examine the root causes of change. He pays informed attention to the law and legal structures. He also draws parallels between the digital revolution and the social changes wrought by other technologies, showing how such change ripples through the economy. He presents his findings as nine "laws of disruption," which, somewhat confusingly, are the change agents of the "Law of Disruption." This forward-looking book is fun, lively and useful. getAbstract recommends it to executives who are trying to plan for a shifting future and to those intrigued by digital technologies or social structures.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great book - easy to read and understand June 9, 2014
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I thought I would find this book boring, outdated, and difficult to understand, but instead I can't find myself putting it down. Even though this book came out 4 years ago, everything Downes talks about is still happening and hasn't been resolved. Downes presents great examples and you'll find yourself adding to his examples with ones of your own.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Read this book to understand technology policy March 23, 2014
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
In "The Laws of Disruption," Internet analyst Larry Downes examines the interplay between the rapid pace of technological change and slow evolution of laws and social norms. Using plain English, Downes explains that the law of disruption, which says that "technology changes exponentially, but social, economic, and legal systems change incrementally," is "a simple but unavoidable principle of modern life." He examines nine areas, using well-known real-world examples, where technology has dramatically changed politics, business, and society including the advent of the Internet, the increase in power (and decrease in price) of microprocessors, and the digitization of content. He then shows how legal and regulatory systems like laws banning spam e-mail have been unable to keep pace with the change; in fact, he shows how technological solutions (like spam filters) addressed many of the perceived harms regulators wished to halt. Downes suggests that legal and regulatory schemes for technology simply won't work or even fail. Instead, he argues that "the best way to regulate innovation is to leave it alone." Progress is happening whether we like it or not. This book is an excellent way to get acquainted and conversant with the technology policy issues dominating the conversation today.
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More About the Author

Larry Downes is a Internet industry analyst and speaker on developing business strategies in an age of constant disruption caused by information technology.

Downes is author of the Business Week and New York Times business bestseller, "Unleashing the Killer App: Digital Strategies for Market Dominance" (Harvard Business School Press, 1998), which has sold nearly 200,000 copies and was named by the Wall Street Journal as one of the five most important books ever published on business and technology.

His new book, "Big Bang Disruption," (co-authored with Paul F. Nunes), argues that the nature of disruptive innovation has changed, and presents twelve new rules for innovators in companies large and small to take advantage of the new opportunities of better and cheaper technologies.

He writes regularly for Forbes, the Harvard Business Review, CNET and The Washington Post.

Downes is Project Director at the Georgetown Center for Business and Public Policy. He has previously held faculty appointments at The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business, Northwestern University School of Law, and the University of California-Berkeley's Haas School of Business, where he was Associate Dean of the School of Information. From 2006-2011, he was a Fellow with the Stanford Law School Center for Internet & Society.

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