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The Leader's Guide to Radical Management: Reinventing the Workplace for the 21st Century [Hardcover] Unknown Binding – 2010

4.4 out of 5 stars 29 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding
  • Publisher: Jossey-Bass (2010)
  • ASIN: B004WOF5DC
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)

More About the Author

Stephen Denning was born in Sydney, Australia. He studied law and psychology at Sydney University. After doing a post-graduate law degree at Oxford University, he joined the World Bank where he worked for several decades in various management capacities, including Program Director of Knowledge Management from 1996-2000.

He is the author of eight books, including The Leader's Guide to Radical Management: Reinventing the Workplace for the 21st Century, which is being published by Jossey-Bass in October 2010.

His book, The Secret Language of Leadership: How Leaders Inspire Action Through Narrative, was selected by the Financial Times as one of the best books of 2007.

The Leader's Guide to Storytelling: Mastering the Art and Discipline of Business Narrative, was named in 2005 by the Innovation Network as one of the twelve most important books on innovation in the past several years.

Squirrel Inc.: A Fable of Leadership Through Storytelling was published in 2004. He has also published Storytelling in Organizations (2004) and The Springboard (2000) as well as a novel and a volume of poetry.

Denning consults with organizations in the United States, Europe, Asia, and Australia on topics of leadership, management, innovation and business narrative.

In 2000, he was named as one of the world's most admired knowledge leaders (by Teleos) and in 2003, he was ranked as one of the world's top two hundred business gurus by Tom Davenport and Larry Prusak in their book, What's the Big Idea?

In 2009, he was a visiting fellow at All Souls College, Oxford University.
Denning's Web site (http://www.stevedenning.com) has an extensive collection of materials on radical management, leadership, innovation, knowledge management and business narrative.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
I received a copy of this book as a galley from the publisher, and I strongly recommend it in any form. I first met Steve Denning when he was recently retired from being the program director of knowledge management at the World Bank, and had created no-cost global networks for multinational information sharing decades before the term M4IS2 came into vogue (Multinational, Multiagency, Multidisciplinary, Multidomain Information-Sharing and Sense-Making). His first book, The Springboard: How Storytelling Ignites Action in Knowledge-Era Organizations (KMCI Press) remains an essential reference for any leader at any level.

This book grabbed me right away, and while it reminds me of Peter Drucker, Peter Senge, and Gifford Pinchot, with a strong leavening from all the books I have been reading in the Collective Intelligence, Evolutionary Activism, Human Scale, and Epoch B Leadership arenas, this is clearly his own unique work and I would venture to say that this is the first book that captures the essence of 21st Century leadership.

My only negative thought is that the book is not "green" in any way, shape, or form, but I have absolute faith that the best of the leaders who read this book will understand thats when the author talks about "Radical Transparency," this should be applied to the entire life cycle of any product or service, and all "true costs" represented.

Oddly enough, this book is a perfect complement to the book I just finished reviewing a couple of days ago,
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Steve Denning begins his book, The Leader's Guide to Radical Management: Reinventing the Workplace for the 21st Century with a quote from John Hagel, John Seely Brown and Lang Davison's 2009 Shift Index to lay the foundation of the problem we face:

"Remarkably, the return on assets for U.S. firms has steadily fallen to almost one quarter of 1965 levels...very few [workers] (20 percent) are passionate about their jobs...executive turnover is increasing. Customers are becoming less loyal to brands...the rate at which big companies lose their leadership positions is increasing."

Everyone is talking about innovation in products, services, processes, supply chain, etc. But few talk about innovating management itself, perhaps because it hits the closest to home and is the hardest and scariest form of innovation. We tend to think of start-ups or `younger' companies when we think of innovative forms of management (e.g., Google, Zappos, etc.), but W. L. Gore is not a `young' company, nor is Standard & Poor's. Innovating management evokes the root fears of innovation - fear of the unknown and of losing control, authority, power, respect, even one's job. How do you experiment and prototype this type of innovation without rocking the company to its core?

That's what Steve's book is about - how to start moving your company forward through radically innovating how and what you manage, based on 7 Principles. In his forthright and clear style, Steve provides a framework for radical management that is simple to understand and follow - but bear in mind, simple doesn't mean easy, and this isn't easy.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
"Radical Management" starts off well, and the first few chapters are an excellent read. Mr Denning documents the declining economic returns to American business, and outlines some of the root causes for this decline. In so doing, he draws heavily from Deloitte's "Shift" report, though he cherry-picks findings from the Deloitte study that support his narrative.

Unfortunately, Mr. Denning's prescription is sophomoric, and seems designed to appeal to those who have no actual responsibility to run a business. Delighting customers, the starting point in Mr. Denning's model, is certainly an important goal. But Mr. Denning seems to forget the reality that organizations have many stakeholders, and all but the most trivial decisions require balancing many interests. While customer delight is a necessary ingredient for success, it is not sufficient.

Mr. Denning's model seems particularly unworkable in light of the recent mortgage bubble. Countrywide Financial, for example, delighted its customers until it blew up.

The rest of the book rapidly declines into a rehash of team theory and exhortations to empower employees. This is old wine in new bottles, "Theory Y" dressed up as something new and different. The later chapters blend into a tedious hash, so that the one memorable idea from the book is "delight your customers".
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Format: Hardcover
Stephen Denning asserts, "the problems of today's workplace are not the personal fault of the individual managers. They are largely the fault of the system they are implementing, which relentlessly constrains the capacity of people to contribute, limits the firm`s productivity, and practically guarantees that clients will be dissatisfied. The mental model of management that these companies are pursuing, with interlocking attitudes and practices, methodically prevents any individual management fix from permanently taking hold." Ironically and sadly, this is precisely the situation to which then chairman and CEO of 3M, William L. McKnight responded...86 years ago: "If you put fences around people, you get sheep. Give people the room they need."

As Denning already knows and understands full well, the institutional constraints that must be eliminated comprise a system (i.e. the status quo) that current senior managers worked hard to establish and are certain to defend. Most change initiatives fail or fall far short of their goals because of resistance that is essentially cultural in nature, the result of what James O'Toole so aptly characterizes (in Leading Change) as "the ideology of comfort and the tyranny of custom." How to overcome such resistance?

Denning advocates what he characterizes as "radical management," based on seven principles. My own opinion is that none of these principles is "radical." On the contrary, as studies conducted by several dozen highly reputable firms and research teams have revealed beyond any doubt, all organizations that achieve and then sustain superior performance have strategies ("hammers") and tactics ("nails") based on these principles.

In ancient Greece, the literal meaning of the word "barbarian" was "non-Greek.
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