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The Leaves of October Paperback – April 1, 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 300 pages
  • Publisher: Speed-of-c Productions (April 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0971614741
  • ISBN-13: 978-0971614741
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,157,448 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Author

I hope you will enjoy this glimpse of the universe of the Scattered Worlds. In the words of the Hlutr: "Is not the Universal Song a grand and glorious thing, to have contained two such as we?" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Don Sakers was launched the same month as Sputnik One, so it was perhaps inevitable that he should become a science fiction writer. A Navy brat by birth, he spent his childhood in such far-off lands as Japan, Scotland, Hawaii, and California. In California, rather like a latter-day Mowgli, he was raised by dogs.

As a writer and editor, he has explored the thoughts of sapient trees (The Leaves of October, Baen 1988), brought ghosts to life (Carmen Miranda's Ghost is Haunting Space Station Three, Baen 1989), and beaten the "Cold Equations" scenario ("The Cold Solution," Analog 7/91, voted best short story of the year.)

Sakers lives at Meerkat Meade in suburban Baltimore with his companion of many years, Thomas Atkinson. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


More About the Author

Don Sakers was launched the same month as Sputnik One, so it was perhaps inevitable that he should become a science fiction writer. A Navy brat by birth, he spent his childhood in such far-off lands as Japan, Scotland, Hawaii, and California. In California, rather like a latter-day Mowgli, he was raised by dogs.

As a writer and editor, he has explored the thoughts of sapient trees (The Leaves of October, Baen 1988), brought ghosts to life (Carmen Miranda's Ghost is Haunting Space Station Three, Baen 1989), and beaten the "Cold Equations" scenario ("The Cold Solution," Analog 7/91, voted best short story of the year.)

In 2009, Don took up the position of book reviewer for Analog Science Fiction & Fact, where he writes the "Reference Library" column in every issue.

In his day job, Don works for the Anne Arundel County Public Library. His actual job title -- "Library Associate" -- makes it sound like he gives lots of money to the Library, but in fact it's the other way around.

Don lives at Meerkat Meade in suburban Baltimore with his spouse, costumer Thomas Atkinson.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By D. Smith (Wedger@sprynet.com) on March 6, 1999
Format: Paperback
Beautifully revealed short stories centered around the most unexpected sapient creatures and their relucted aid in helping mankind reach maturity. Good, well-thought sci-fi supports this ongoing story covering a billion years plus. Leaves you hungry for a continuing trilogy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By M. Hogarth on August 26, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
I loved this book when I first discovered it in its first printing from Baen in 1988... and having recently re-read it, I can only conclude that... I still love it. It's still brilliant. And sadly, I doubt much like it would see print in these days. How often do you see stories told from the standpoint of sapient trees? Considering humanity, with the slow, long-lived wisdom of plants? Each chapter is told from the viewpoint of a different individual of the Hlut species, starting with the very first Traveler who went to Earth in hopes of convincing the human species that they were sapient. And the story progresses that way: at a stately pace. Human civilizations rise and fall, interstellar empires explode, conquer, gasp out their last, build again... and we only see that in pieces, through the lens of a long-lived eye.

You really feel it... what it would be like to live for millions of years. The Hlut are convincingly alien, and yet they are wonderful, compassionate, thoughtful. You leave the book wishing there were such things.

I love a book that allows us to see humanity from a different viewpoint. I love a book that's willing to take the risk of existing outside that human viewpoint, in the brain of an alien, and then having the audacity to narrate it from the heads of aliens. I love this book's considered pace, which enforces the same meditative process on its readers. And I'm glad that it got published.

Thanks, Don Sakers, for the Hlut. :)
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By Clover on September 6, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Initially I started reading this because I've enjoyed other works by Don Sakers, but the book quickly became one I read because of its own merits. I found myself enjoying the story as well as I found the underlying ideas led to interesting philosophical conversations. The book is also well worth rereading since each time I understand it in a new way.
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By Scott A. H. Ruggels on September 22, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It's not a bad book and it certainly has a very original premise. But it was probably more philosophical than my tastes enjoy. It certainly is a "kindly" book, but also perhaps a little twee. It's worth a look for the originality alone though, and the price is right.

Scott
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Format: Paperback
This book has some decent stories but moves along at a snail's pace. There are too many ridiculous proper names to keep up with...it's just not that interesting. I don't regret reading it...just wish he could have kept my attention better.
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