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The Legends of King Arthur and his Knights Paperback – November 15, 2013


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 184 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (November 15, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1466256885
  • ISBN-13: 978-1466256880
  • Product Dimensions: 10.2 x 7.8 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (268 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,665,621 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Sir James Knowles (1831 13 February 1908) was an English architect and editor. He was born in London, the son of architect James Thomas Knowles and himself trained in architecture at University College and in Italy. He designed, amongst other buildings, three churches in Clapham, Lord Tennyson's house at Aldworth, the Thatched House Club, the Leicester Square garden (as restored at the expense of Baron Albert Grant), and Albert Mansions, Victoria Street, Westminster.[1] However, his preferences led him simultaneously into a literary career. In 1860 he published The Story of King Arthur. In 1866 he was introduced to Alfred Lord Tennyson and later agreed to design his new house, Aldworth, on condition there was no fee; this led to a close friendship, Knowles assisting Tennyson in business matters and, among other things, helping to design scenery for The Cup when Henry Irving produced that play in 1880. Knowles became intimate with a number of the most interesting men of the day, and in 1869, with Tennyson's cooperation, he founded the Metaphysical Society, the object of which was to attempt some intellectual rapprochement between religion and science by getting the leading representatives of faith and unfaith to meet and exchange views. Members included Tennyson, Gladstone, W.K.Clifford, W. G. Ward, John Morley, Cardinal Manning, Archbishop Thomson, T. H. Huxley, Arthur Balfour, Leslie Stephen, and Sir William Gull.[1] The society formed the nucleus of the distinguished list of contributors who supported Knowles in his capacity as an editor. In 1870 he succeeded Dean Alford as editor of the Contemporary Review, but left it in 1877 owing to the objection of the proprietors to the insertion of articles (by W.K.Clifford notably) attacking Theism and founded the Nineteenth Century (to the title of which, in 1901, were added the words And After). Both periodicals became very influential under him, and formed the type of the new sort of monthly review which came to occupy the place formerly held by the quarterlies. Inter alia it was prominent in checking the Channel Tunnel project, by publishing a protest signed by many distinguished men in 1882. In 1904 he received the honour of knighthood. He was a considerable collector of works of art. He was married twice, in 1860 to Jane Borradaile, in 1865 to Isabel Hewlett. He died at Brighton and was buried at the Brighton Extra Mural Cemetery.

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Customer Reviews

A very good tale told in the language of the times.
Paul Mayer
This book was a bit hard to read because of the language, and I found also that it is a bit slow.
La Gigi
Great book, wonderful classic, formatted well for the Kindle.
ElectricHarpsichord

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

571 of 606 people found the following review helpful By T. S. VINE VOICE on October 13, 2009
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It's curious to me that this is the best-selling version of the King Arthur story in the kindle store, because it's a singularly flawed collection, well-eclipsed by other variants that are also available for free online; I suspect its popularity is an artifact of the search engine, not the book's own merits.

The author, Sir James Knowles, was an architect and friend of Tennyson, best known for founding the Metaphysical Society; this is, therefore, a very Victorian Arthur. In this case, "victorian" means "bowdlerized to the point of inanity." The story of Merlin's enchantment of Uther and Igraine to arrange Arthur's conception is almost completely elided ("When Uther, therefore, was at length happily wedded" -- yep, that's the whole story); Sir Tristram is apparently completely chaste with Iseult (King Mark just doesn't like him for some indiscernible reason) and even when Lancelot and Guinevere are caught together and the entire course of the story turns on adultery, such that bowdlerization was completely impossible, Gawain suggests that "it may well be that Lancelot was in her chamber for no evil." The story of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is simply not included at all.

I suppose that kind of bowdlerization might be acceptable in a children's version of the Arthur stories, but this edition isn't good for that either, for two reasons: 1) like many free kindle ebooks, all illustrations have been removed, and 2) it's a kindle edition, and who gives a $250 ebook reader to a child too young to read a story with adultery in it?

There are other problems also.
Read more ›
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48 of 57 people found the following review helpful By mrs. higgensworth on July 19, 2009
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I enjoyed this book, or what part of it I read, anyway. It is the rather un-nuanced account of the adventures had by a group of knights (of the Round Table, of course). There is no character development and very little overarching plot to tie the stories together, but there is something oddly compelling about it. There is a great deal of smiting, and rending helms asunder, and rescuing fair maidens in distress (can you imagine???? The evil giant makes ladies actually do manual labor, though they be of high birth!).

You get the general idea pretty quickly, I've read half and feel like I've gotten all I will get out of this book. It's free though, so I am glad I checked it out.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Celebrimbria on March 10, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book has the most thrilling example of medieval life than any other book that I have seen,or heard of!When I read this book,after only reading a few pages,I got hooked on it,and just couldn't seem to put it down!I hope other people will enjoy this book as much as I have.The book's descriptions of kings,knights,battles ,damsels,Lancelot,Guinevere, and most of all Arthur were wonderful!Even though I am only 12,I recomend this book to young readers everywhere!

(this next part of my review was written at a later date)

This was the first review I ever posted on amazon, and it seems rather odd now, going back and looking over it...because I'm seventeen, five years have passed, and I still love this book. I suppose that's why I've read it twenty-eight times; I fell in love with it as a child and it stayed with me. And so, I still recommend it! If you're young, enjoy adventure, with a healthy splash of fantasy and faith, then you will enjoy this. That's my recommendation; maybe in another five years, I'll come back and add to it.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Wally Chang on June 9, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book was about how King Arthur's life supposedly was. He was born after King Uther tricked an enemy duke's wife into thinking that Uther was her husband. That child was given to Merlin, and he was un-christened, and was given to Sir Ector. He became a squire at his new home and had a bigger stepbrother to help. When the sword in the stone appeared, all the knights and noblemen around England appeared to try and pull it out, since the person who pulls out the sword in the stone is supposedly the king of all England. Throughout his life he encountered many people like Sir Lancelot of the Lake, who fell in love with his beloved wife, Guinevere, and also gave birth to a child with his half-sister when she disguised herself. He would later become a legend for all the things he had done during his life.
I read this book because I watched the movie from Disney called "The Sword in the Stone." It sparked my interest of knights and I was fascinated with the Middle Ages ever since. Then when I went to the library, this book was the only one about King Arthur that wasn't checked out, so I read this wonderful recount of the amazing life of Arthur.
I recommend this book to everyone above the age of 9. There are some "not so good for children parts" in this book. If you are a child who wants to read about King Arthur, then you should choose this book. If you want something that is easier, I suggest you not to select this book since it is kind of a hard book.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Mithril on August 27, 2009
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Classic King Arthur stories, with all the smiteth-ing and destresseth damsels one might wish.

A bit of a slow read due to the older writing style and inclusion of every name of every knight present at every battle, but the book contained everything from Merlin's predictions to the Quest for the Holy Grail to Arthur being bore off to Avalon, although it lacked the tale of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.
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