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The Lie: A Novel Paperback – March 3, 2009

3.7 out of 5 stars 104 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

“Testosterone-fueled fiction.…Readers who got a kick out of Kultgen’s first book will get a bang out of this.” (Publishers Weekly)

About the Author

Chad Kultgen is a graduate of the USC School of Cinematic Arts. His novels include The Average American Male, The Average American Marriage, The Lie, and Men, Women & Children, the basis of a feature film by Jason Reitman. He lives in California.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial; 1 edition (March 3, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061657301
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061657306
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 1 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (104 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #112,848 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Chad Kultgen is a graduate of the USC School of Cinematic Arts. His novels include The Average American Male, The Average American Marriage, The Lie, and Men, Women & Children, the basis of a feature film by Jason Reitman. He lives in California.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I've been reading a lot of fratire books lately and this one is definitely one of my favorites. I liked Kutgen's other book "the Average American Male" and I think this one is even better. It has the same sort of crude man humor, but it also has a much more interesting plot. Also, the story is told from the perspective of three main characters which gives you a cool look into how they see the same things differently. The Brett character is hilarious. The inhumane (this is an understatement) things he does to women is so outrageously funny that the author should consider writing another book just about Brett. I know it's only fiction, but it is darn funny to read about. Reading things from the character Heather's perspective reminds me of why I dumped my last girlfriend. She and Heather are both snobby, materialistic, sorority girls without a clue. Great job Kultgen and bring on the next one.
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By Jeremy on December 15, 2012
Format: Paperback
Let me just preface this by saying I am a male college student, and probably the intended audience for this book. However, I must say that by the time I finished this book, I considered it to be a complete waste of my time. Let's start by first looking at what worked for the book: the layout. The way Kultgen tells the story through the three different characters is admittedly interesting. It keeps you turning the page and always reading *just* one more chapter. This is largely what got me through the 400+ pages.

Let's now look at what doesn't work for the book: the story. It starts out interesting, and builds a good base of characters, all telling this story in retrospect and continuously referring to some event as to why they all hate each other in the present. It's an interesting premise and makes it seem to the reader that there is some really interesting explanation to all of this if you just continue reading. Well, I continued reading. And reading. And reading. The story doesn't really even get to any sort of semblance of an ending until the last 30 pages or so. All the while, you're reading these 400 pages and hating the characters more and more. The situations get increasingly farfetched and the characters' reactions to everything start to lose any connection to their personality, or how any real human would react, and become more just plot devices to reach an ending. Speaking of, for all of your dedicated reading, you are rewarded with an ending that just seems genuinely thrown together. For instance, a plan is hatched and executed all in the span of one page. For 400+ pages, I expected more.

In summary, the book starts off well, with some real potential, however, once you get about halfway you want to start getting to what "The Lie" is actually about. You don't.
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Format: Paperback
This is my first Chad Kultgen read. The storyline is inconceivable and repulsive yet comical.

Brett, the son of a wealthy businessman has little admiration for women. This borderline psychopath isn't interested in holy matrimony, parenthood or operating his father's empire. Brett merely craves evoking as much agony and degradation as possible. His companionship with fellow student, Kyle, is Brett's only semi-rational relationship with another human being.

An intellectual bookworm, Kyle aspires to attend medical school. Unfortunately, he meets and falls in love with a dim-witted, self-seeking and untrustworthy freshman named, Heather.

Heather attends college with the hope of acquiring a successful husband. She sets her sights on Brett but settles for Kyle instead. Like SERIOUSLY, why didn't Heather simply utilize her brain for once in her pathetic life?

I do consider most of the context distasteful. Frankly, I'm a bit mystified that my best friend recommended it. On the flip side, the author's tale is both appalling and brilliant.

Rating: 8

Plot: 8

Characters: 8 (although jaded at times)

Ending: 8

Enjoyment: 8

Cover: 8
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
After seeing "Men, Women, & Children" in theaters, I searched on Amazon to buy the book, and also found some more of Kultjen's work. I usually read the book first and see the movie second as I always have a hard time separating the actors who played the characters from the characters themselves. The very reason it has taken me around 5 years to move forward in reading Patricia Highsmith's Ripliad. I still picture the characters as Matt Damon, Jude Law, and Gwyneth Paltrow in "The Talented Mr. Ripley". Anyway, I picked this book up and gave it a shot without really knowing much about the author or the story.

I was pleasantly surprised by the fact that I enjoyed reading it since I am not exactly the demographic that fratire aims for. The story is rather captivating and although quite inconceivable, it's a fun time. I ended up reading it at the gym on the stationary bike and found myself going longer and longer to read more. I love that the story is told from the 3 different viewpoints of the three main characters. Especially since it really shows how interactions, both big and small, are read differently by the people involved. The writing was good aside from the Heather character saying "like" so much. If I ever met anyone who said it that often, I wouldn't be able to handle it. The character of Brett does horrible things to women, to push their limits, and I know it's for shock value but it was rather unrealistic that college girls would do any of that.

Regardless, the book did remind me a lot of Brett Easton Ellis, particularly the narrative from "The Rules of Attraction" and the character of Brett has a lot of similarities to Patrick Bateman. In fact, one of the best things I noted was the perception of the interactions between the characters and that is a huge part of "The Rules of Attraction". Over all, I really enjoyed it. I will probably end up picking up more of Kultgen's books.
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