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93 of 94 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "There Is Laid Up For Him A Crown Of Righteousness."
Beware! Danger ahead! This man's life and death will change you.
Are you comfortable with your "lot" Christian reader? Content with your religious practice? Satisfied with your progress in things spiritual? Should you be led to feast on the diary of David Brainerd with mind open (to God) and heart sensitive, you won't be. Do you sense that God must be...
Published on December 7, 2000 by Daniel A. Learned

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars David Brainerd: A melancholy witness for Christ
Excellent diary of the missionary David Brainard and his work among the Indians of the Susquehanna Valley. Truly devoted to Christ while struggling with depression but encouraged by a dynamic relationship with his Lord
Published 20 months ago by Le Longue Carabine


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93 of 94 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "There Is Laid Up For Him A Crown Of Righteousness.", December 7, 2000
By 
Daniel A. Learned (Newcomerstown, Ohio United States) - See all my reviews
Beware! Danger ahead! This man's life and death will change you.
Are you comfortable with your "lot" Christian reader? Content with your religious practice? Satisfied with your progress in things spiritual? Should you be led to feast on the diary of David Brainerd with mind open (to God) and heart sensitive, you won't be. Do you sense that God must be quite pleased with you and all of the efforts you expend for His kingdom? Should you persevere and finish the book, such a sense will be dismantled by God's Spirit!
Buried within the private, personal journals of a young missionary (chronologically speaking - he went home to heaven at age 29) is a depth of spiritual wisdom, fervor for God's kingdom and glory, and love for the Savior, quite unparalleled (if not unrecognizable) in modern Christianity. The mystics would acknowledge in Brainerd what they themselves longed for, a wholesale abandonment to God - His purposes and His will.
Brainerd's growth in grace began with his conversion in 1739. His own words best describe: "My soul rejoiced with joy unspeakable to see such a God, such a glorious divine Being...My soul was so captivated and delighted with the excellency, loveliness, greatness and other perfections of God, that I was even swallowed up in Him...I wondered that all the world did not see and comply with this way of salvation, entirely by the righteousness of Christ."
One who has been so entirely apprehended by the Almighty is enabled to see his own soul very clearly; and this Brainerd did. The depth of his own depravity was before his eyes each day of his new life and most certainly played a part in his frequent melancholy. But it was balanced and fueled by the awareness of Christ's perfection and the beauty of His perfect remedy for sin.
The missionary was fixated on the promotion of God's kingdom; among the heathen Indians in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, ignorant settlers, and even the clergy, whom he endeavored to instruct, exhort and encourage, even on his deathbed. The hardships and privations he endured in the preaching of the glorious gospel of Jesus Christ are quite beyond our ability to imagine. Total self-denial marked him clearly. He faced death at many turns. He was willingly and joyfully spent for his Savior. But, oh what fruit God brought forth! Read and see.
Listen, as he describes for us the essence of true Christianity and its counterfeit, from his journal entry on the Lord's day, May 24, 1746: "Could not but think, as I have often remarked to others, that much more of true religion consists in deep humility, brokenness of heart, and an abasing sense of barrenness and want of grace and holiness, than most who are called Christians imagine; especially those who have been esteemed the converts of the late day. Many seem to know of no other religion but elevated joys and affections, arising only from some flights of imagination, or some suggestion made to their mind, of Christ's being their's, God loving them, and the like." Another entry; June 18,1747, just months before his death in Jonathan Edward's home: "Especially, I discoursed repeatedly on the nature and necessity of that humiliation, self-emptiness, or full conviction of a person's being utterly undone in himself, which is necessary in order to a saving faith; and the extreme difficulty of being brought to this, and the great danger there is of persons taking up with some self-righteous appearance of it...being never effectually brought to die in themselves, are never truly united to Christ, and so perish."
Can we at all identify, dear reader?
Take a journey through the early years of our great land with a courageous servant of God. This is a book to touch the soul, to be re-visited time and again, to be worn out with handling.
But perhaps what makes this journal so compelling, is not the chronicling and inspiration of a remarkable missionary life, so much as the MESSAGE that God anointed. The Church mystical and corporate needs to recover this message today. Delve in and be changed!
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66 of 66 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of the better "Biographies" written, October 16, 2000
This is not a true biography as the title let's on, although it is almost always filed as a biography in any Christian bookstore. Jonathan Edwards, who knew Brainerd personally writes a short biographical sketch, but the book is largely Brainerd's on writings and journals. The journals were not written to ever be published, and the reader will recognize this right away. Therefore they contain honesty and transparency that a typical biography would never come close to.
Largely a prayer journal, it communicates Brainerd's wrestling with God, his confusion, and his incredible heart for holiness. Your heart will be thrilled as you work through this great work. You will refer back to it years after you read it.
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36 of 36 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Daily insight into the life of a man of prayer., May 28, 1999
The life and Diary Of David Brainerd is a convicting testimony of a life of pray. Giving great encouragement and insight to one seeking truth that is only revealed to the humble in heart. In these writing we have a glimpse of the inner chamber of a mans heart, the most secret place of a holy man. Brainerd's diary gives great hope and encouragement to the necessity of prayer. In this diary you see the life of prayer affecting the man and the ones prayed for. You see how the glory of god is places above one's self and their desires. How powerful is the conviction of the Holy Spirit upon the heathen, breaking down all bearers, because of the prayers of David Brainerd. I highly recommend this book for those seeking truth, truth beyond intellect and reasoning, truth revealed to the heart.
I first heard of David Brainerd while reading 'E. M. Bounds, Man Of Prayer'. The Diary Of David Brainerd was one of the books read often by Bounds. I recommend reading 'The Complete Works of E. M. Bounds on Prayer.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A look into the heart of a man totally committed to God., January 28, 2000
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A facinating book; the combined efforts of three men to portray the story of David Brainerd. Mostly a diary of his days of going to the Indians in New Jersey and beyond in the early 1700's, it takes you through his very short life that was given that men might receive the gospel of Jesus Christ and be new creatures in Him. He was wiser in knowing what a true believer was than I have ever heard of. I loved hearing how changed and loving the Indians became, and how he used his time. I was impressed with the intensity of how he lived. I thank God for Amazon.com because otherwise I probably never would have found this book.
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32 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read and Weep at the Passion!, March 1, 2005
David Brainerd was an incrediable man of God. The son-in-law of the great theologian Jonathan Edwards, Brainerd combined sound theology with a deep passion for Jesus. His story is one that should be told to our children's children.

Brainerd's diary is a wealth of the spiritual passion of a man who longed to see American Indians won to Christ. His hatred for his own sinfulness is found throughout the book. Some days Brainerd is on the mountain of God and the next he is in the valley of despair. With the exception of the dairies of the late Keith Green, have I seen a man who truly wrestled with his own flesh by the power of the Spirit.

For those longing to be all that God wants them to be (Philippians 3:7-12), I would urge you to purchase this book. You will be blessed and challenged.
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must Read, November 7, 2001
We live in a day of "easy belevism". The days we live in are also sadly characterized by a christianity, which implies when it doesn't declare, that life is supossed to be easy for the child of God. The reader will see both of these dilusions dispelled in the life story of David Brainerd. Brainerd,was willing to undergo great hardship to take the true gospel to the natives of his day. His life shows all christians what happens when "glorifing God and enjoing Him forever" becomes ones chief aim in life. This certainly is not a chicken soup for the soul book that can be read with little thought. This book, however, will challenge every christian to live for the glory of God.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Native Rescuer, February 21, 2007
David Brainerd's recorded life speaks my heart and breath--my longings for my heavenly home. This is a must read for all as it washes away the deceiving beguilement of trendy Christianity.

Traveling through his pages of life, you witness his true mission that of only knowing Christ and Him crucified, 1 Corinthians 2:1-2. He was one of few who despised this vile world with its entertaining ways.

His soul displayed was that of a faithful, humble, loyal pastor who ministered to the natives in isolated areas of New England. He never set himself above these socially rejected ones who he found to be quite refreshing in contrast to snobbish white folk. He became known among fur trappers as "The man who trapped Indians with love."

Below are experts from David Brainerd's diary. The initial are the quotes of "His Heart." The following are observances of "His Natives."

His Heart:

"I know I long for God and conformity to His will, in inward purity and holiness, ten thousand times more than for anything here below."

"God was so precious to my soul, that the world, with all its enjoyments, was infinitely vile. I had no more value for the favor of men, than for pebbles."

"Spent the day mainly in conversing with friends; yet enjoyed little satisfaction, because I could not find but few disposed to converse on divine and heavenly things. Alas, what are the things of this world, to afford satisfaction to the soul! In secret, I blessed the God for retirement, and that I am not always exposed to the company and conversation of the world. Oh, that I could live in the secret of God's presence!"

His Natives:

"Discoursed from John 4:13, 14. There was a great attention, a desirable affection, and an unaffected melting in the assembly. It is surprising to see how eager they are to hear the Word of God. I have oftentimes thought that they would cheerfully and diligently attend divine worship twenty-four hours together if they had an opportunity so to do."

"I never saw any appearance of bitterness or censoriousness (being critical) in these, nor any disposition to `esteem themselves better than others.'"
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Challenging read in so many ways, December 19, 2005
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This book is not for the faint of heart, or those not willing to put in the time to read and think.

While this edited for length, the writing style is still that of 18th century English, and it can be a little difficult to parse at times. However, once you get use to that, this biography is chock-full of challenging questions about the nature of sin, salvation, and God's plan for our life's work.

At times, Brainerd seems particularly pessimistic, even to the point of being clinically depressed, while at other times, he seems to be floating on cloud nine (although much more of the former than the latter).

I read this as a part of a small discussion group, and that helped in the understanding of various passages.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brainerd writes clearly what we are to affraid to say publically, October 17, 2008
David Brainerd writes things that no self respecting Christian would dare say about themselves. That right there is the problem, more people respect themselves then they do God and his word. He really brings to light what we are and the fact God saved us not because of any good that is in us, God saved us for his good pleasure.

If this book doesn't help you crave holiness and a closer walk with the Lord then I would have to wonder what kind of Christianty you are living. To quote his book, "February 20: I was perplexed on account of may carelessness; thought I could not be suitably concerned about the important work of the day, and so was restless with my easiness. Was exceeding infirm again today; but the Lord strengthened me, both in the outward and inward man, so that I preached with some life and spirituality, especially in the afternoon, wherein I was enabled to speak closely against selfish religion, that loves Christ for his benefits, but not for himself."

This book will challenge you on every level to live a holy life for God. Thank God for the men that have gone before us and have stayed faithful to the end
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Native Rescuer, February 21, 2007
David Brainerd's recorded life speaks my heart and breath--my longings for my heavenly home. This is a must read for all as it washes away the deceiving beguilement of trendy Christianity.

Traveling through his pages of life, you witness his true mission that of only knowing Christ and Him crucified, 1 Corinthians 2:1-2. He was one of few who despised this vile world with its entertaining ways.

His soul displayed was that of a faithful, humble, loyal pastor who ministered to the natives in isolated areas of New England. He never set himself above these socially rejected ones who he found to be quite refreshing in contrast to snobbish white folk. He became known among fur trappers as "the man who trapped Indians with love."

Below are experts from David Brainerd's diary. The initial are the quotes of "His Heart." The following are observances of "His Natives."

His Heart:

"I know I long for God and conformity to His will, in inward purity and holiness, ten thousand times more than for anything here below."

"God was so precious to my soul, that the world, with all its enjoyments, was infinitely vile. I had no more value for the favor of men, than for pebbles."

"Spent the day mainly in conversing with friends; yet enjoyed little satisfaction, because I could not find but few disposed to converse on divine and heavenly things. Alas, what are the things of this world, to afford satisfaction to the soul! In secret, I blessed the God for retirement, and that I am not always exposed to the company and conversation of the world. Oh, that I could live in the secret of God's presence!"

His Natives:

"Discoursed from John 4:13, 14. There was a great attention, a desirable affection, and an unaffected melting in the assembly. It is surprising to see how eager they are to hear the Word of God. I have oftentimes thought that they would cheerfully and diligently attend divine worship twenty-four hours together if they had an opportunity so to do."

"I never saw any appearance of bitterness or censoriousness (being critical) in these, nor any disposition to `esteem themselves better than others.'"
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The Life and Diary of David Brainerd
The Life and Diary of David Brainerd by Jonathan Edwards (Hardcover - July 25, 2007)
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