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The Lincoln Mailbag: America Writes to the President, 1861-1865 Hardcover – August 14, 1998


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Southern Illinois University Press; 1st edition (August 14, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 080932072X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0809320721
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 1 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #534,894 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

This book is a sequel to Holzer's 1993 collection, Dear Mr. Lincoln: Letters to the President (LJ 11/1/93). The contents of the present volume include newly discovered letters, most importantly a batch of hitherto neglected letters from African Americans. Lincoln's personal secretary, later joined by two aides, served as a "filter" for the hundreds of pieces of mail that arrived for him each day. Unlike Holzer's previous volume, which was arranged thematically, these letters are strictly chronological. They make for absolutely fascinating reading, evoking the full range of human emotions from laughter to tears. Holzer, the author, coauthor, or editor of ten Civil War-related books, has wisely kept all the misspellings intact, and each letter also has a useful explanatory note. All libraries will want this volume on hand.?Stephen G. Weisner, Springfield Technical Community Coll., MA
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

“[A] collection that shows the spirit of America, at its biggest and its meanest.”   —Publishers Weekly



“Holzer, a leading authority on the period, does a masterful job of annotating and explaining the letters, truly recreating the mood and atmosphere of the time.”      —Parade Magazine



“The contents of the present volume include newly discovered letters, most important a batch of hitherto neglected letters from African Americans. . . . They make for absolutely fascinating reading, evoking the full range of human emotions from laughter to tears.”—Library Journal

“A revealing glimpse into how civil war and emancipation appeared from the White House, this browsable collection of epistles and replies enriches the body of Lincolniana.”—Booklist

“Holzer presents an enlightening selection that reveals something of the variety of pressures Lincoln faced each day. The editor’s ebullient personality emerges clearly from the preface and introduction.”—Civil War History

“Holzer has done a wonderful service to anyone interested in the Presidency in general and the Lincoln administration in particular.”—Journal of Illinois History


More About the Author

Harold Holzer, one of the country's leading authorities on Abraham Lincoln and the political culture of the Civil War era, serves as chairman of the Lincoln Bicentennial Foundation. He has authored, coauthored, and edited forty-two books, including Emancipating Lincoln, Lincoln at Cooper Union, and three award-winning books for young readers: Father Abraham: Lincoln and His Sons, The President Is Shot!, and Abraham Lincoln, the Writer. His awards include the Lincoln Prize and the National Humanities Medal. He lives in New York City.

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Steve (observer8@aol.com) on July 23, 1998
Format: Hardcover
I had bought Harold Holzer's 1993 book "Dear Mr. President" and enjoyed it tremendously. That book dealt with the mail that ordinary and famous people from around the world sent to Abraham Lincoln during his term as U.S. President. Now, Holzer has produced a sequel book, "The Lincoln Mailbag", which contains even more letters written to Lincoln. A large number in this new volume consists of mail Lincoln never even saw, such as correspondence from black Americans. These two books by Holzer offer a fresh, new insight into the world of President Lincoln which is far more interesting than the ordinary, standard Lincoln biographies which seem to pop up every 6 months or so.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Anyechka on May 3, 2007
Format: Paperback
This book, a sequel of sorts to Mr. Holzer's 1993 volume 'Dear Mr. Lincoln,' gathers together even more letters than Americans from all walks of life wrote to the President. Mr. Holzer is a Civil War and Lincoln expert, so he really knows his stuff. As he explains in the foreword, many of the letters he had decided for various reasons to leave out of the original volume are now included here. What makes this collection of letters so special is that many of them were never even seen by President Lincoln, and of the ones seen, many of them were never endorsed or answered. It was for that reason that Mr. Holzer originally thought such letters didn't merit being included, but then he realised the value of including them, particularly since many of them were written by African-Americans. They'd already been ignored once, and didn't deserve to be marginalised and written off again nearly 150 years later for the same reasons they'd been excluded before.

People wrote to President Lincoln because they felt that he was a man of the people and would therefore understand their hopes, dreams, worries, and fears. He didn't appear to them like some out of touch government bigwig who didn't care for the common people; due to his humble origins, they felt as though he were one of them.
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