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31 Reviews
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69 of 72 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Linux book you can actually use to do stuff.
Linux may be cool, but the documentation is horrible. There are tons of inconsistent HOWTO files, out of date FAQs, and a bunch of programmers that don't really see the problem. Whenever you want to do anything with Linux, you usually have to read every piece of documentation out there, and basically reverse-engineer a solution.
Most commercial Linux books for...
Published on August 13, 2001 by Jon Konrath

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32 of 41 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good for command line junkies
Target Audience
Command line Linux users who want practical examples of how to do things.
Contents
This is a detailed book on how to accomplish a number of tasks using the command line interface of a Debian Linux distribution.
The book is divided into seven parts and the following chapters:
Part 1 - Working With Linux - Introduction; What Every...
Published on April 3, 2004 by Thomas Duff


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69 of 72 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Linux book you can actually use to do stuff., August 13, 2001
By 
Jon Konrath (San Francisco, CA) - See all my reviews
Linux may be cool, but the documentation is horrible. There are tons of inconsistent HOWTO files, out of date FAQs, and a bunch of programmers that don't really see the problem. Whenever you want to do anything with Linux, you usually have to read every piece of documentation out there, and basically reverse-engineer a solution.
Most commercial Linux books for beginners (or at least for people who don't dig through C++ on a daily basis) are not well laid out. I should know - I wrote several chapters in one a few years back. They are usually organized by major system - a chapter on installation, one for video, one for sound, one for networking, and so on. But what if you want to write a book? Or record an album? Unless you can dig around on the web to find someone else doing the same thing, you are out of luck.
I'm glad that a book like this is out there. First, it is much more theoretical and philisophical than most approaches. That means it doesn't matter if you have RedHat 7.0 or 7.1 or whatever. It's just like if you are using a cookbook to make food - it doesn't matter if you use fresh-squeezed orange juice or Minute Maid orange juice, other than the difference in taste and texture - the basic lessons still apply.
I haven't seen other No Starch books, so I don't know if the look and feel is specific or part of the series, but it works. It's not a glossy, corporate taste - it's easy to flip through and fun to use. After reading a few pages to solve a problem, you're suddenly reading for hours and realizing that there are a lot of other things you could be doing with Linux - and that's the point. People don't need to be programmers to use a computer, and people can use their computer for more than email, web browsing and minesweeper. It's like you wanted a recipe to make some hamburgers, and you find a dozen new dishes you'll want to try for the next few weeks.
Great approach overall, and it's also very cool that you can download the entire thing for free at dsl.org, if you want to check it out first, or just have a copy on your local hard drive. I wish more books did this.
Overall, very excellent! Now I just need some more time to try out all of the things I've seen in here...
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Real GNU/Linux open source! Great book!, August 20, 2001
By 
xul "xul010" (milky way galaxy) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Michael Stutz practices what he preaches. He wrote and typeset the entire book using open source GNU/Linux tools exclusively. This book is a must for users at all levels. Instead of imitating M$ Michael Stutz shows and tells how to do nearly everything using "pure" GNU/Linux tools and applications. He has organised the book very well and struck a balance between terseness and verbosity. He has correctly chosen to order the material according to the jobs to do. He deals with real everyday tasks and configuration issues without trying to isolate the user from the system. He treats the user as an educated, intelligent human being with learning skills and willingness to do some real work. Michael Stutz has added real value instead of just copying HOWTOs. His book is a MUST for every GNU/Linux user. It is for the end user and is NOT a system administrator's handbook. Thanks, Michael, for the great job! May your book be translated into some other major languages.
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30 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Extreme View, January 24, 2002
By 
"frutger" (Santa Monica, CA) - See all my reviews
This book offers an extremist view of Linux.
It shows you how to do your everyday computer
work using ONLY open source software - many
Linux books take a much less "pure" view of
the system. But that's not all. It can also
claim what others can't. The dirty little
secret of Linux books is most authors use M$
to write and publish them! But Stutz is a
GNU/Linux fanatic, and he wrote and produced
the whole thing with ONLY Open Source software!
This in effect means that the book itself is
an example of the kind of things you can do
with Linux. And if that wasn't enough this book
is also Open Source! If he is right that the
Open Source movement is about to transform book
publishing like it transformed software, then
this book is a glimpse at the future.
And by the way, Linux Cookbook is packed with
lots great tips! It is a thorough guide for
learning how to use any Linux system, regardless
of your distro or hardware. It is refreshing to
see such an extreme view brought to the everyday
user. Dare I suggest that it may one day be
regarded as a "classic for the masses".
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cookbook approach to working with Linux, October 31, 2004
This review is from: The Linux Cookbook, Second Edition (Paperback)
Let me start with what this book is and is not. There is nothing on how to install, troubleshoot, or administer Linux and it is not supposed to have that information. This is a cookbook and is designed to be a resource when you have a specific goal in mind and want to know how to get there. The first several chapters focus on the very basic Linux information that everyone working in the operating system should know. This includes such common items as how to determine what processes are running and how to determine who you are logged in as. Of course anyone with even a minimum of Linux experience knows this stuff. For the more experienced Linux users the later chapters deal are a real treasure. It includes things like viewing and editing images, PostScript, working with sound, and cross-platform conversions. The recipe style layout really works well. Like a list of ingredients the author lists the program to be run, package manager name for the installation package, and the home page where the package can be found. This is one of the really nice features of the book. If you are looking for how to accomplish a specific task you can look it up, see if there is a program to accomplish it, locate and install the program if necessary, and follow through the specific directions to achieve your desired result. The Linux Cookbook, 2nd Edition is very highly recommended for the new Linux user, and recommended as a desk reference to keep available for the more experienced user who may just need to know how to convert that mp3 file to another format and burn the result to a CD.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding Linux book!, November 12, 2002
* * * * *
This book may have had Debian as its base, but, this book can easily be used with any distribution. I have been using Linux for six years now, and I was able to learn commands that I didn't know even existed. Don't pay any attention to those who will give this book only three stars simply because they didn't read the books discription and bought the wrong book. This one is a real winner. I antipipate that this book will be in my library for some time to come because most of the books contents go over stuff that will most likely not change very much over time.
* * * * *
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Thorough Coverage, October 10, 2004
This review is from: The Linux Cookbook, Second Edition (Paperback)
When this book fell out of its shipping envelope, it made quite a thunk as it hit my desk. No wonder: at almost 800 pages, this is quite a chunk of reading material.

I had been impressed by the first edition. The only real complaint I had about that was its exclusive focus on Debian Linux; that's been corrected here. The first edition was available on-line in its entirety; this is not, although you can see a sample chapter and the table of contents at (...).

Unlike the first edition, this covers a lot more basic material. Don't let that turn you off if you have outgrown the beginner books - unless you are expert at everything, you'll find helpful material here. There are pointers to esoteric utilities you probably have never heard of mixed in with the "getting started" stuff.

I was interested that Amazon reviews were luke-warm. I think it deserves better. I would have liked to see less attention to the real basics, but that does make this useful to the beginner also. One Amazon review didn't like it because it was too geeky, a complaint I can't sympathise with. Another didn't like the concentration on command line tools - I hope that isn't a sign of things to come where Linux users join their Windows brethren in disdain of character based interfaces.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A lil geeky maybe..., July 2, 2004
By 
I had been using Linux for around two years when I came across this book. I was surprised there was so much more to know about Linux. After casually glancing through its pages I realised this was a treasure chest.
If you are the shell user type, you will definitely enjoy this book. If you are GUI user, you will start appreciating the shell.There are easier ways to do what you have been doing and this book will show you how to do those things.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Culinary Masterpiece!, August 30, 2001
"More Stuff, Less Fluff" is the slogan for No Starch Press and nicely sums up this excellent reference guide. It's tersely written and straight to the point with a metric tonne of helpful tips on nearly every aspect of the Linux operating system. Perfect for the novice who wants to dive head-first into Linux and become productive fast, although experienced users looking for more esoteric material should look eleswhere. The Linux Cookbook by Michael Stutz is on par with O'Reilly's Running Linux for overall readability and usefullness, and I can give no higher compliment than that.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fascinating approach..., July 25, 2001
By 
When I first saw this I was like "COOK" book? but then I flipped through it and I saw the light... the whole point is that you know what YOU want to do, and then you look up the "recipe" to do that... it really seems to make sense, and I've learned a lot about Linux!
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Guide To Open Source!, December 20, 2001
By A Customer
I use this book all the time at work where we are
using Linux more and more. This was first just for
Systems but now I am using Linux for my own productivity,
writing reports and printing. I love the power of the
commands and it's all in this book! I do take exception
to the reader below who wanted to change case of file
names "manually" - this person should reread the book's
intro as all Open Source software is out on the Internet
made by different people, this is what makes it so powerful.
But that is the joy of this book. It's format and coverage
makes it fill a gap that has been sorely needed in the
Open Source / Free Software community.
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The Linux Cookbook, Second Edition
The Linux Cookbook, Second Edition by Michael Stutz (Paperback - August 11, 2004)
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