Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Literary Animal: Evolution and the Nature of Narrative (Rethinking Theory) Hardcover – May 25, 2005

3 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$91.01

Save up to 40% on professional, scholarly and scientific resources.
Wiley's Summer Savings Event
Save up to 40% on professional, scholarly and scientific resources. Learn more.

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jonathan Gottschall has a Phd in English and teaches at St. Lawrence University.

David Sloan Wilson is professor of biology and anthropology at Binghamton University.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Rethinking Theory
  • Hardcover: 375 pages
  • Publisher: Northwestern; 1 edition (May 25, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0810122863
  • ISBN-13: 978-0810122864
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.5 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,957,621 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5 star
100%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 40 people found the following review helpful By atavism on September 19, 2006
Format: Paperback
As an evolutionary biologist with a strong interest in literary theory, finding this book was extremely exciting for me, and it definitely lived up to my expectations. The book consists of a collection of thought provoking, well written essays that emphasize the need to incorporate evolutionary theory into the analysis of literature (and a few other art forms) and provide strong examples of the benefits of using this technique. The contributing authors come from a wide range of disciplines and bring a variety of views to the text. Some of my favorite essays included an analysis of Pride and Prejudice using evolutionary themes, an investigation of male-male bonds in narratives, and a discussion of the possible benefits we receive from watching/reading drama. I strongly recommend this for anyone who is interested in evolution, literature, or human nature.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Jeff Turpin on January 5, 2007
Format: Paperback
Literary Animal is a relief to those of us who find that traditional literary theory just doesn't fit the empirical world. Insightful, fair, and balanced, the text is stimulating on a variety of levels, with measured critiques of existing theoretical approaches, and applications of evolutionary theory to a variety of literary tales. A gate-way text for students and teachers of this new theoretical paradigm.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Richard B. Schwartz TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 16, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a book designed to carve out space for a school. It might be compared with the ‘Chicago school’ book, Critics and Criticism. It brings together a number of neoDarwinian literary scholars and colleagues in the human sciences in order to make a point in various ways: the lessons of evolutionary psychology are relevant for literary study and could, actually, revolutionize literary study.

This is a gutsy book, but its gutsiness may not be immediately apparent to students in the human sciences. It argues that there is such a thing as ‘human nature’, that aspects of ‘human nature’ can be demonstrated through the use of science and that that nature is the result of both nature and nurture. That seems simple enough, except for the fact that many literary students (especially those whose endeavors or scholarly designations end in –ism or -ists) often believe that there is no such thing as human nature and that human behavior is constructed largely (or even exclusively) by human culture. In other words, a large number of literary students believe things which the scientific community considers somewhere between ‘disproven’ and ‘nonsensical’. To adapt the ways of science thus involves the necessity of abandoning some thirty years of literary ‘scholarship’ and the admission that its foundations were fanciful (or, more likely, ideological).

The book opens with forewords by two titans—E. O. Wilson and Frederick Crews—and includes essays by such important scholars as Brian Boyd, Joseph Carroll, David Sloan Wilson and the novelist/essayist Ian McEwan.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again