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The Little Book of Commodity Investing Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (June 29, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0470678372
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470678374
  • Product Dimensions: 7.2 x 5.3 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #749,900 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

‘…fantastic simplicity and elegance…the best explanation of "contango" and "backwardation" that I've read' (FT.com, October 2010).

From the Inside Flap

Your next, best investment opportunity isn't in stocks, bonds or real estate-it's in commodities, the basic raw materials of everyday life. Smart investors know that after a decade of decline, stocks aren't where the big money will be made. The winning bets of the future will be where global growth is going, rather than where it's been.

A rapid re-ordering of the global economic pecking order is underway, transforming the lives of millions and setting the stage for a massive bull market in commodities. Asia, led by China, is rising, and by 2020 the developing world is expected to be responsible for a staggering two-thirds of total global economic output. As millions of people around the world join the ranks of the global middle class, they'll be snapping up consumer items such as appliances and cars and underpinning an enormous demand for commodities. The economic strides made by the developing world so far have been breathtaking, but they're only just beginning. And that's a good news story for commodities.

From cocoa to copper, the world of commodities is awash in opportunity. Yet commodities get short shrift in most investment portfolios despite the fact there are long stretches of time when commodities soar while stocks and bonds swoon. This is one of those times.

Understanding commodities is a prerequisite for future investment success and The Little Book of Commodity Investing is an indispensable guide for investors-whether they're titans on Wall Street or retirees on Main Street-to the ins and outs of this hot sector, that will only get hotter. This practical guide covers:

  • why commodities figure as part of any well diversified investment portfolio
  • all major commodities and what makes the tick
  • why commodities often zig when other investments zag
  • why commodities are the next big thing.

More About the Author

John Stephenson is an award-winning portfolio manager specializing in commoditiies and equities. In his books and free investment newsletter, John shows you where the stock, bond, currency and commodity markets are going. John is the author of The Little Book of Commodity Investing and Shell Shocked: How Canadians Can Invest After the Collapse.

Customer Reviews

I was wrong, I knew a lot of what was in this book.
VM
A great read, packing more bang for your buck than any investment book I have ever read.
Patrick
If I could, I would have given zero stars for this book.
LocalIndian

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By LocalIndian on December 30, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If I could, I would have given zero stars for this book.

This is my first book on Commodities, but I could hardly find anything new that I have not heard on TV or see in news papers. It's all just very high level fluff throughout the book. From page one its pure marketing on "Invest in commodities". Why? China is consuming, India is consuming, stocks recently crashed, average traders are making 2 to 3 million a year in Chicago. At least half the book (give or take few percentage) is wasted on this marketing. Yeah... there are few details like how oil industry is trying to improve recovery, how shale gas resulted in oversupply, Amarnath went belly up in commodity trades... and invest in Commodities any way as you are going to make a fortune.

One of the most useless books I bout this holiday season. I could not comprehend how all seven folks were able to rate it 5 stars.
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Scott Forbes on September 19, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Just as John's first book, Shell Shocked, laid out a compelling case for "buying all the Canada you can get," this book lays out the case for commodities. "Commodities" and "commodity trading" are intimidating terms to many investors, as are "futures" and "futures contracts." That's largely because American consumers are raised on the DOW and a few of the ancillary indices. A perfect example of that myopia is how people are presently yelling about the "lost decade" that investors have had from 2000-2010, conveniently leaving out the benefits of dividend reinvestment and the possiblity that individual investors and equity fund managers could have overweighted on Apple Inc. stock during the decade. Regardless, many individual investors buy the hype, panic, and make emotional decisions like putting lots of money into a savings account earning .05%.

It is in this sort of a climate that John helpfully points out that commodities are:

* not intimidating
* easy to understand
* a smart investment for our times

Why are commodities not intimidating? Because they're all around us. They're the things we use every day, like the gasoline that goes into our cars or the wheat and flour that we find in our bread. Sure, the price of gold gets all the headlines--it's sort of like the DOW of commodities--but there are so many more places that investors can put their money to work in commodities.

Commodities are easy to understand because they're being used or consumed all the time. Check out the shipments coming into a restaurant or a supermarket on any given day and you'll see commodities coming in that have been purchased and are about to be put to use by the restaurant or supermarket.

Why are commodities a smart investment for our times?
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By GFR on September 16, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This was one great read, and an easy one at that. You would think that a book about commodities would be about as dull as dishwater, but in The Little Book of Commodity Investing, author John Stephenson brings this world to life and explains why commodities figure in every portfolio. Best yet, I feel like a more informed investor. I would recommend this book without reservation to anyone who wants a better financial future.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By VM on March 3, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I bought this book on commodities since I thought I knew nothing on this type of investing. I was wrong, I knew a lot of what was in this book. This book only lists different kinds of commodities that can be invested in. It gives some historical background on each commodity. It does NOT tell you anything about how to actually invest in a commodity, how the margins work, limit up and downs, anything about the actual market one might need to know before getting into it. Some of the explanations and historical information was interesting which is why I gave it two stars, but without any actual information on commodity investing - the title is a little misleading.

After reading through the book I can't help but give the Eddie Murphy look from Trading Places when pork belly commodities were being explained to him and they said "like you might find in a bacon, lettuce and tomato sandwich" (youtube watch?v=emvySA1-3t8). I can't believe I bought this book.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Jake Jazz on March 6, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I don't want to spend a lot of time on a review of a book this useless -- reading it was enough of a waste of time. There are no strategies on how to trade or analysis of what to buy. The bottom line is that developing markets are consuming more so commodity prices will go up. I already know this, and everyone that watches the news knows it. He also talks a lot about western counties having maxed out their credit cars -- something else I am well aware of. The author list some commodities, mentions some of the main commodity producers, gives a junior high school style report of where the commodities come from, mentions some ETF... That's it.

What I was looking for in this book was some sort of strategy on what and how to buy -- isn't that finance books are for? The author put very little effort into writing this (you can find most of this on Wikipedia, honest), offers absolutely no insight, and therefore this book has no value whatsoever. Do not buy it -- watch TV instead...
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13 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Ah Pui on August 17, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I believe in market cycles. Every investment instrument has its own boom and bust cycles. Even if you strongly believe in sound currency and values of hard assets, investing in gold and its various forms in the 80's and 90's(full 20 years period) will lead you to disgust and total distrust of the PM market. There were periods for bond and general stock market investing but I firmly believe as this book has clearly illustrated, the time for commodities investing has now ARRIVED and especially for the Precious Metals market which is about to go gangbusters.

There are many factors which are going to drive up commodities prices to new sustainable highs in the coming years, one of the major driving factors is definitely inflation, I mean BIG-TIME inflation. Governments around the world are busy playing currency games, monetizing debt, giving values to totally "junk assets", buying and issuing bonds like playing reckless bets on a monopoly game, where trillions with 9 zeros "investing" don't mean a thing no more, only difference is the game is real, the money is supposedly REAL coming from taxpayers pockets and people's lives are at stake. To keep this game running, governments are working overtime printing their money away like there is no tomorrow. When there is an (almost) infinite amount of supply(dollars), chasing a very finite amount of resources, we know what happens next. Economics will bring the much sought after commodities(be it hard assets like precious metals or soft assets like food etc) prices to equilibrium with the dollar amount. We definitely want to be in position and get along with the WILD WILD commodities boom ride when it starts.
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