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The Little Book of Hedge Funds Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (May 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1118099672
  • ISBN-13: 978-1118099674
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 5.4 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #534,119 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Most of the books I've read on investing are about as appealing as chewing on a cinder block. Fortunately, Anthony Scaramucci has written The Little Book of Hedge Funds, an entertaining and informative book without the typical Wall Street bombast, and it's nearly small enough to fit into my back pocket.

Scaramucci is a regular contributor to CNBC's Fast Money, so he knows how to deliver a cogent message when he explains "the history and evolution of hedge funds and how they operate." The Little Book of Hedge Funds has everything from interviews with industry giants (Leon Cooperman) to a Due Diligence Questionnaire for potential investors. This is not a book loaded with charts, spreadsheets and algorithms but rather a straightforward anecdotal piece with something for everyone. Whether you're a neophyte who wants to learn the basics, an investment guru who'd like to pick up some gossip -- or more importantly -- someone who is considering investing their savings with a money manager, this is a worthwhile read.

There are numerous comedy analogies throughout the book, and I found this one particularly amusing: "Mutual funds are Rodney Dangerfield, while hedge funds are Jon Stewart."

I'm not sure how accurate that is, but it kept me reading from cover to cover.

URL: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rob-taub/book-review-the-little-bo_b_1443135.html

—The Huffington Post By Rob Taub Apr. 23, 2012

From the Inside Flap

Hedge funds. Everyone's talking about them, but what are they—really—and why should they matter to you? Presenting an accessible overview of these often discussed but rarely understood investment opportunities, The Little Book of Hedge Funds covers everything from their origins to their perceived effect on the global economy, and most important, why it's worth your while to understand how they work.

Essential reading for anyone looking to invest in this lucrative yet mysterious world, this book provides the tools and information guaranteed to illuminate the ways in which hedge funds have grown in both size and importance in the investment community. And why their future lies in their ability to provide greater transparency to those investors currently staying away because they don't understand how they work.

Written in a straightforward but entertaining style that makes getting a grip on the subject matter a breeze, this book examines hedge funds from all angles. Exploring everything from the financial techniques—including leverage, short selling, and hedging—that hedge fund managers use to reduce risk, enhance returns, and minimize correlation with equity and bond markets to the myriad investing strategies (including their strengths and weaknesses) that they employ, this book has you covered. And most important, it lays to rest the prevailing misconception that investing in hedge funds is somehow riskier than putting your money into other asset classes.

Filled with insightful commentary, actionable advice, and engaging anecdotes, The Little Book of Hedge Funds provides novice investors, experienced financiers, and financial institutions with the must-have tools and information needed to conquer the investment vehicle that everyone is talking about.


More About the Author

ANTHONY SCARAMUCCI is the Founder and Managing Partner of SkyBridge Capital, LLC, a New York-based alternative investment management company focused on partnering with emerging managers and seeding and mentoring Wall Street's next generation of entrepreneurs. Prior to founding SkyBridge, Mr. Scaramucci was a co-founder of Oscar Capital Management, which was sold to Neuberger Berman, LLC in 2001 after building a managed account business and four hedge funds having in aggregate more than $800 million of assets. Upon Neuberger Berman's sale to Lehman Brothers in 2003, he served as a Managing Director in their Investment Management Division. From 1989 to 1996, Mr. Scaramucci was at Goldman Sachs & Co., where in 1993 he became a Vice President in Private Wealth Management. He earned a BA in Economics from Tufts University in 1986 and graduated summa cum laude. He is a member of the Phi Beta Kappa society. He graduated with a J.D. from Harvard Law School in 1989. He is a Board Member of The Lymphoma Foundation and The Brain Tumor Foundation. Mr. Scaramucci is also on the Board of Overseers for the School of Arts and Sciences at Tufts University and a member of the NYC Financial Services Advisory Committee.

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Customer Reviews

Well written and relatively easy to read.
Sindri Geirsson
You can feel the difference when the author is genuinely passionate about the subject at hand and when he's just going through the motions.
Matthew Schoenfeld
Great little book for the newbie who wants to know more about this mysterious area of investing.
Ken Perry

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By David Merkel on June 30, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I have worked for a hedge fund, and I have many friends that work for hedge funds. I understand hedge funds well.

The "Little Book" people at Wiley should indeed have done this book, but with a different author. Why? When there are significant areas of controversy around a topic, and you write a book as if there is no controversy, it means you haven't done your homework.

There are many like Simon Lack, who wrote "The Hedge Fund Mirage," and Dichev and Yu, who wrote "Higher risk, lower returns: What hedge fund investors really earn." (Note to readers at Amazon.com, if you read this at my blog, Alephblog.com, you get links to aid your learning.

Quoting from my review of Simon Lack's book:

"But, some of the problems with hedge funds, as a opposed to open-end mutual funds, is that:

1) Many hedge funds go out of business, and as they do, their bad performance is not recorded, and sometimes lost.

2) Hedge funds with good performance give the databases their early performance. Bad early performance does not get reported.

3) The activity of investors chasing trends is more pronounced in hedge funds than in mutual funds, with a loss of returns of 5% in hedge funds, versus 3% in mutual funds. This is all due to greater volatility.

4) Double alpha is generally not achievable, because most managers good at longs are not good at shorts, and vice-versa. Going long and short are different skill sets."

These are issues that the author of the "Little Book" does not address in any significant way. He mentions Simon Lack's book once in passing, but doesn't do anything substantive with it. He also does not deal with the difference between dollar-weighted and time-weighted returns.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By DudeMan on July 27, 2012
Format: Hardcover
It is difficult to express how bad this book is. Just to give you a flavor:

*several porn related references throughout
*insipid "interviews" with hedge fund managers that contain one or two line answers
*Warren Buffett is a hypocrite comment
*apparently this author doesn't believe Madoff ran a Ponzi scheme - how else do you read a weird comment like this (page 8 - "he was running a separate account business that made tons of money...)"
*investment nuggets like "hedge funds are not a panacea for all the world's ills"
*lots of plugs for SkyBridge Capital

Horrible, just horrible.
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By Sindri Geirsson on April 8, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Really good book for those who want to know how the Hedge Funds operate. Well written and relatively easy to read.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By T. Kepler on December 9, 2012
Format: Hardcover
An entertaining read to fulfill a personal goal of reading at least one finance or investing-related book each year. The book helps to de-mystify the hedge fund industry. Not clear to me how folks in an industry that doesn't actually make or innovate anything can get exorbitantly wealthy in short order. If more intelligent and motivated individuals aimed to be hedge fund gurus, who then would be our engineers, neurosurgeons, teachers, musicians, etc.? The cautionary note caveat emptor should apply exponentially to any industry that relies on leverage or borrowing money beyond reason and common sense to reach so-called alpha. With a modicum of due diligence, the individual investor could apply some of the book's advice, e.g., diversifying holdings across asset classes to reduce risk, and increase the possibility of success and decrease an adverse outcome or substantial loss in the market. Chapter 10, "From Wall Street to Park Avenue" is a primer on aspiring acolytes to the field, and some of the "15 Things" are noteworthy for their ideals, yet I would hardly equate with the money management crowd. And one of the best lines in the book..."make sure you do non-linear nice things for people - with no quid pro quo expected." Does this include reducing the management fee?
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Anshuman Kumar on March 28, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Really enjoyed the writing style. Would have given 5 stars if it had stronger and more detailed examples. Great starting point on hedge fund industry
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By M. Ford on December 3, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If you are investing in hedge funds or thinking about investing in them, reading this book is worth your time and money.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By mariamaria on July 3, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
funny and very informative, I recommend it, it's clever and offers information on related areas as well, good book, good examples as well.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful By MrBigBeast on June 4, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
About 230 pages counting the completely redundant introduction.
Relentlessly repetitive, aimed at the rank beginner, peppered with humor too old and corny to be of use, and self-promotional.

How many times do you need to be told that hedge funds seek absolute rather than relative returns? Will 25 suffice? How about 50?

In some places, the material is just plain wrong. Most likely this is just due to bad editing, but it's still annoying.

However, if you are a good skimmer and use a highlighter, this book is worth the money just for the references to names, places, other texts, etc.

At 40 pages it could have been a little gem.
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