Awake 1 Season 2012

Amazon Instant Video

Season 1
(21) IMDb 8/10
Available in HD

2. The Little Guy TV-14 CC

Where do we go from here?

Starring:
Jason Isaacs, Laura Allen
Runtime:
44 minutes
Original air date:
March 8, 2012

Available in HD on supported devices.

The Little Guy

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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I liked the cast, as well.
Samster
It's too easy to make an assumption that minimizes the entire potential arch of the story.
sceout
One of the best shows on TV, in my opinion.
David Breisch

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By kacunnin TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 26, 2012
NBC's new drama, AWAKE, which premiers officially on March 1, is an intriguing, edgy story about a man struggling to deal with loss in the aftermath of a tragic accident. Police detective Michael Britton (Jason Isaacs) can't remember much about the car accident itself, but he finds himself living in two alternating realities, one in which his wife died and the other in which his son did. He goes to sleep in one world and wakes up in the other, never quite sure if either, or both, are real. He sees a therapist in both worlds (B.D. Wong in one, and Cherry Jones in the other) and he has different partners at work (Wilmer Valderrama and Steve Harris). The cases Michael must investigate in the two worlds seem to oddly interconnect, and both therapists insist he's creating one reality to protect himself from losing both his wife and his son. But could both realities be real?

How does the pilot stack up as a potential TV series?

First the positives:

1. Strong acting - all of the major players are solid. Jason Isaacs, who most will remember from his role as Lucius Malfoy in the HARRY POTTER films, is wonderful as Michael Britton. This is a man torn between sanity and loss, and his grief is visceral and understandable. The supporting players are excellent, as well, especially B. D. Wong and Cherry Jones, who portray very different kinds of therapists who come up with exactly the same diagnosis.

2. Clever and original premise - AWAKE does remind me of the American version of LIFE ON MARS (where a police detective finds himself inexplicably living twenty years in the past), but only on the surface. This is an original idea, with the potential to be very exciting as Michael learns more about the two realities he's living in.

3.
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Episode 2 of AWAKE ("The Little Guy") makes it very clear what works about this show and what doesn't. I was very involved in Michael Britton's personal life, including his sessions with the therapists in his two different worlds, and his relationships with his wife and son. I was less interested (and bored, even) with the police procedural elements of the episode. With just 45 minutes of airtime, it's hard to do justice to a crime story when the most compelling aspect of the series has nothing at all to do with police work.

Then again, maybe it does. "The Little Guy" throws a monkey wrench into the debate over whether Michael (Jason Isaacs) is dreaming one of his realities - something is very fishy about that car accident that killed his wife or his son (or maybe both of them). The writers have decided we need a conspiracy to chew on, so they give us one in the final minutes of this episode. I have very mixed feelings about this, especially since it sets up yet another kind of story we'll have to juggle in future episodes.

A few things to notice in this episode:

1) There's a distinct green tint to the scenes that take place when Michael is with his son, Max, and a red tint to the scenes that take place when Michael is with his wife (the colors correspond to the rubber bands he wears on his wrist to keep himself straight on which reality he's living in at any given time). This was also present in the pilot episode, however I didn't really notice it. Now, I do. And it's a little distracting! I found myself watching for the color changes and losing track of the story. Hopefully, this is just a temporary distraction, and it will all fit together seamlessly as the show continues.

2) Michael seems much more adjusted in this episode.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 27, 2012
Since the season of DOWNTON ABBEY is over for the year it is refreshing to come upon an intelligent new series that is fresh, fascinating, well acted and takes a new stance on not only law enforcement but character development and the more serious questions of what happens to the person left behind after a tragic accident.

After a car accident takes the life of a family member, police detective Michael Britten (Jason Issacs) lives two alternating parallel lives, one with his wife (Laura Allen) and one with his son Rex (Dylan Minnette). Is one of his "realities" merely a dream? These are the dilemmas Michael faces with the help of his two psychiatrists - BD Wong and Cherry Jones - and each psychiatrist deals with the family member Michael is convinced is still alive. What is reality, what is dream, what is the effect of grieving?

Writer Kyle Killen works this conundrum along with Michael's function as a detective - partnered with detective `Bird' (Steve Harris) and detective rookie Efrem (Wilmer Valderrama) - and as they investigate murders episodes from Michael's strangely bifurcated lives add additional mystery.

It will be interesting to see how this storyline develops: nothing is obvious from the first episodes except that for an opening story, this one shows great promise. Grady Harp, March 12
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By Robert Wallace on May 20, 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video
I write this having watched the entire series. I was hooked from the get-go. Impressed by the writing and psychological aspects, I found myself disappointed in a few episodes that seemed to stress the procedural "murder of the week" aspect. This would have been much stronger as a more serialized story.

There are a few standout episodes, among the best television has ever had to offer, and the casting is spot-on. I enjoyed the season finale, and while I was disappointed that it wasn't renewed for any other seasons, I felt total closure. My interpretation was different than my wife's and my parent's, who felt like they were given the middle finger at the end, so I suppose it is up for debate. But as for me, I loved every second and wish there was a physical media release for me to hold onto and show people. Oh, well.
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