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The Little Red Hen and the Passover Matzah Library Binding – March 1, 2010


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The Little Red Hen and the Passover Matzah + KidKraft Passover Set
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Product Details

  • Lexile Measure: 530L (What's this?)
  • Library Binding: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Holiday House (March 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0823419525
  • ISBN-13: 978-0823419524
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 10.1 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,185,485 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Starred Review. PreSchool-Grade 3—This Yiddish-inflected retelling of "The Little Ren Hen" features a balabusta (good homemaker) who kvetches about her lazy no-goodnik friends who will not help her make matzah from wheat. When they show up at the Passover Seder, the hen scolds, "What chutzpah!" Ultimately, however, they repent and the hen forgives them because she is a mensch. All ends happily as they make up for their earlier bad behavior by doing the dishes. The droll ink, watercolor, and pastel cartoon illustrations have a friendly charm that makes a nice contrast with the story's wry humor. The Yiddish vocabulary and speech patterns will have Jewish adults rolling in the aisles, and children will enjoy the merging of familiar Passover and folktale elements. It's entertaining to those in the know, but readers unfamiliar with the holiday may be mystified by the humor, and they will gain little understanding of the traditions of Passover. An endnote on the holiday's history, a matzah recipe, and a glossary round out the package, but the book should be used in combination with more traditional tales or with audiences who already observe Passover. It's a must for Judaica collections and a solid choice for large general collections.—Heidi Estrin, Feldman Children's Library at Congregation B'nai Israel, Boca Raton, FL
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

The Little Red Hen has gone through various versions and permutations, but surely this is the first time she has a Yiddish accent. Realizing it’s almost Passover, the Little Red Hen says, “Oy gevalt!” She needs matzah for her seder dinner, and that means growing wheat. Horse, Sheep, and Dog are not interested in helping. Harvesting? Again, nope. Milling? “We’re resting.” By now, the Little Red Hen realizes she’s dealing with a bunch of no-goodniks. She bakes the matzah (“according to Jewish law . . . in just eighteen minutes”) and then sets her seder table. Guess who arrives? “What chutzpah!” But then the Little Red Hen remembers the Haggadah’s words: “Let all who are hungry come and eat.” Children familiar with Passover will get a kick out of this, and the ink-and-watercolor art amusingly captures both the Little Red Hen’s aggravation and the animals’ turnaround. Those really in the know might wonder about a sheep at a holiday table where lamb’s blood plays a major role, but, hey, at least none of the guests are pigs. Preschool-Grade 1. --Ilene Cooper

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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See all 10 customer reviews
Truly a book for the entire family to enjoy.
M. J. Jones
"What chutzpah!" scolds the Little Red Hen, but remembering the edict "Let all who are hungry come and eat," her menschy self prevails and she invites them in.
Jewish Book World Magazine
Adults and children alike will enjoy this book.
J. Tuttle

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By M. Tanenbaum VINE VOICE on July 20, 2010
Format: Library Binding
In this retelling of the classic story of the Little Red Hen, no one will help the Little Red Hen make the Passover matzoh, but they all want to help her eat it at her seder. Contains background on Passover, a recipe for matzoh, and a glossary of Yiddish words used in the story. Illustrated with whimsical water color illustrations, this is a delightful Passover story, peppered with traditional Yiddish words and phrases. In an ending with a twist, the Little Red Hen invites all her friends to her seder, even though they haven't helped with anything, because of the commandment in the Passover Hagaddah "Let all who are hungry come and eat." But when it's time to wash the dishes, it's the Little Red Hen's turn to rest, while her friends help out. A good addition to any library of Jewish picture books, this book would be fun to read each year while getting ready for Passover.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jewish Book World Magazine on September 1, 2010
Format: Library Binding
A beloved storybook character is given a Yiddish twist in this clever and humorous retelling. Realizing that Passover will be here before she knows it, the Little Red Hen sets about preparing to make matzah from start to finish. But who will help her plant, harvest, grind and schlep the wheat? Not her lazy friends Sheep, Horse and Dog, who disappoint her at every step ("Friends, schmends...I'll just do it myself.") Finally Passover arrives and it's time to make the matzah, which the Little Red Hen accomplishes in the mandated eighteen minutes "according to Jewish law". She sets her Seder table, prepares the traditional foods, and is just waiting for the sun to set when who should come knocking at the door? Those no-goodniks Sheep, Horse and Dog, of course. "What chutzpah!" scolds the Little Red Hen, but remembering the edict "Let all who are hungry come and eat," her menschy self prevails and she invites them in. At least they do the dishes! Pleasing watercolor-and-ink cartoon style illustrations add to the humor (check out the baby chick wearing a yarmulke). Includes a brief explanation of Passover and instructions for making matzah. A perfect holiday title for all Judaica collections. For ages 4 - 8. Teri Markson
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M. J. Jones on April 26, 2010
Format: Library Binding Verified Purchase
I bought this book as a present for adult family members. The children and adults loved it. It is especially good for demonstrating the sharing values of Passover. Truly a book for the entire family to enjoy.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ruth Mizel on April 13, 2013
Format: Library Binding Verified Purchase
My 3 year old granddaughter and I really enjoy this book! It's very funny with its yiddish words. The illustrations are wonderful and the story is so classic. A good learning experience and a fabulous sharing experience for an adult and child.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J. Tuttle on April 15, 2011
Format: Library Binding Verified Purchase
Adults and children alike will enjoy this book. It follows the traditional Red Hen story and then has a wonderful "Jewish" twist at the end.
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