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The Little Sister: A Novel (Philip Marlowe series Book 5) [Kindle Edition]

Raymond Chandler
4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (101 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $14.95
Kindle Price: $11.68
You Save: $3.27 (22%)
Sold by: Random House LLC

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Book Description

A movie starlet with a gangster boyfriend and a pair of siblings with a shared secret lure Marlowe into the less than glamorous and more than a little dangerous world of Hollywood fame. Chandler's first foray into the industry that dominates the company town that is Los Angeles.

Books In This Series (7 Books)
Complete Series


  • Editorial Reviews

    From Library Journal

    Chandler is not only the best writer of hardboiled PI stories, he's one of the 20th century's top scribes, period. His full canon of novels and short stories is reprinted in trade paper featuring uniform covers in Black Lizard's signature style. A handsome set for a reasonable price.
    Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

    Review

    "Raymond Chandler is a master." --The New York Times

    “[Chandler] wrote as if pain hurt and life mattered.” --The New Yorker

    “Chandler seems to have created the culminating American hero: wised up, hopeful, thoughtful, adventurous, sentimental, cynical and rebellious.” --Robert B. Parker, The New York Times Book Review

    “Philip Marlowe remains the quintessential urban private eye.” --Los Angeles Times

    “Nobody can write like Chandler on his home turf, not even Faulkner. . . . An original. . . . A great artist.” —The Boston Book Review

    “Raymond Chandler was one of the finest prose writers of the twentieth century. . . . Age does not wither Chandler’s prose. . . . He wrote like an angel.” --Literary Review

    “[T]he prose rises to heights of unselfconscious eloquence, and we realize with a jolt of excitement that we are in the presence of not a mere action tale teller, but a stylist, a writer with a vision.” --Joyce Carol Oates, The New York Review of Books

    “Chandler wrote like a slumming angel and invested the sun-blinded streets of Los Angeles with a romantic presence.” —Ross Macdonald

    “Raymond Chandler is a star of the first magnitude.” --Erle Stanley Gardner

    “Raymond Chandler invented a new way of talking about America, and America has never looked the same to us since.” --Paul Auster

    “[Chandler]’s the perfect novelist for our times. He takes us into a different world, a world that’s like ours, but isn’t. ” --Carolyn See




    From the Trade Paperback edition.

    Product Details

    • File Size: 2552 KB
    • Print Length: 256 pages
    • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 039475767X
    • Publisher: Vintage; Reissue edition (June 11, 2002)
    • Sold by: Random House LLC
    • Language: English
    • ASIN: B000FBFM4S
    • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
    • X-Ray:
    • Word Wise: Not Enabled
    • Lending: Not Enabled
    • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #72,741 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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    Customer Reviews

    4.1 out of 5 stars
    (101)
    4.1 out of 5 stars
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    Most Helpful Customer Reviews
    30 of 33 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars An underrated and underestimated effort December 7, 2001
    Format:Paperback
    Postwar L.A. -- and especially Hollywood -- is the setting for Chandler's fifth Marlowe novel which, like the time and place (and the author himself), is a little "off." Marlowe's beginning to tire, his loneliness is a bit more apparent, and the disillusionment has started to etch permanent lines on him.
    None of which stops him. Neither does it make "The Little Sister" a bad work. In fact, it holds up remarkably well alongside Chandler's first four novels.
    Chandler draws upon contemporary events and personages for much of his inspiration here (something he did in several earlier stories and novels, to a lesser degree); the photo which triggers the action in "Sister," for example, is based on an incident involving gangster Bugsy Siegel . . . but then the character of Steelgrave, himself, bears a more than passing resemblance to the then-recently deceased hood. It's equally evident that Chandler relied upon his recent screenwriting experience (and exposure to Paramount and Universal studios) for material and characters. There's an element of gleeful revenge, I suspect, for example, in the character of agent Sheridan Ballou: certain characteristics, such as his tendency to strut up and down his office twirling a mallaca cane, can only have been inspired by director/screenwriter Billy Wilder (with whom Chandler, collaborating on the screenplay for "Double Indemnity," shared an entirely mutual loathing).
    Other characters, primarily a pair of mismatched thugs sent to intimidate Marlowe, are pure burlesque; Chandler appears to be simply indulging himself here (while he simultaneously manages yet another dig at the movie industry).
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    35 of 41 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars More than a Crime Novelist September 15, 2002
    Format:Paperback
    The latest in a long series of visits to LA had me refreshing my memory of one of my favourite novelists. As a young man I knew the Philip Marlowe books nearly by heart before I ever set foot in the city they put on the literary map. I have always thought that Chandler counts as literature not just as crime fiction. He was a professed admirer of the ultra-craftsman Flaubert, and it shows in the way he works at every sentence, indeed every word. He was English and as far as I know unrelated to the 'real' LA Chandlers (he attended the same school as P G Wodehouse, if you can believe it). He maintained that 'the American language' can say anything and in The Simple Art of Murder he took a brilliant potshot at the Agatha Christie school of English crime fiction , all tight-lipped butlers polishing the georgian silver and respectful upper-middles gathered to hear the amateur master-sleuth analyse over 5 or 6 pages which of them dunnit. His power of creating atmosphere is phenomenal, his dialogue is legendary, and for me The Little Sister is the best of the 7 Marlowes. It's at the crest of the hill, before he started to lose concentration in The Long Goodbye and lost just about everything in the sad Playback. I can still feel the heavy heat at the start of the book, and the dialogue is the best he ever did. Is there any other instance of anyone silencing Marlowe with an answer the way the beat-up hotel dick does when Marlowe tells him he is going up to room such-and-such and the hotel dick says 'Am I stopping you?'. And I cherish the bit about the same character tucking his gun into his waistband 'in an emergency he could probably have got it out in less than a minute'. Read more ›
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    9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars Another Search for a Lost Soul August 14, 2004
    Format:Paperback
    Phillip Marlowe receives a visit from Orfamay Quest. She came from Kansas to track down her brother Orrin; he moved to Los Angeles a year earlier and has stopped writing home. Marlowe visits Orrin's last address, a rooming house in the seedy part of town. The room now contains G. W. Hicks, who is moving out, and knows nothing. When Marlowe leaves, he notices the manager is now dead! Later Marlowe receives a phone call, hiring him for a job. When Marlowe shows up at the hotel room, he finds a dead G. W. Hicks, killed with an ice pick like the rooming house manager. Somebody searched the room, but Marlowe found what they missed. The Police are called again. Marlowe uses the claim check to retrieve photographic prints. The hotel detective noticed a woman visitor, and gives Marlowe her license plate number. Now the investigation continues into new territory.

    The story echoes "Farewell, My Lovely" and other stories. A private detective is hired to find somebody. The client doesn't tell the Whole Truth. Coincidences and complications pop up to carry the story forward. The Whole Truth isn't revealed until the last pages, and the final deaths which tie up the story without loose ends. Again, the scandals and crimes that created the murders aren't revealed until the end. There are only shades of gray, no blacks and white. All the characters have something to hide. A recurring theme in Chandler's stories is that crime leads to blackmail, and blackmail leads to murder. Can a snapshot of a couple at a restaurant result in six dead bodies? Chandler makes it believable.
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    Most Recent Customer Reviews
    1.0 out of 5 stars Kindle error
    Did NOT receive books on my Kindle....
    Published 1 day ago by Henry C Womack
    5.0 out of 5 stars It's Film Noir In Print
    Come on. It's Raymond Chandler. It's "film noir" in print.
    Published 4 days ago by Kindle Customer
    5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
    Fun to read. I liked all the similes and metaphors. It got a liile confusing with all the charactes.
    Published 5 days ago by Edward Hart
    4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
    Fun to go back in time a bit. Like an old Bogart movie
    Published 13 days ago by Barry Smotherman
    4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
    good but not great- for Chandler
    Published 14 days ago by Bill Bibow
    5.0 out of 5 stars Well written book
    This story holds your attention even though the setting is in an earlier century. The writer is an expert story teller. Read more
    Published 18 days ago by bayu
    5.0 out of 5 stars Best of the genre
    Great. Chandler invented the hard-boiled yet accessible private eye and nobody's done it as well.
    Published 18 days ago by Barye Phillips
    4.0 out of 5 stars Classic Carver
    Great classic detective story.
    Published 19 days ago by Zachary J. Dalkin
    3.0 out of 5 stars Noir Mystery Lover
    This is not as good as some of Chandler's other Philip Marlowe books, but there are some good parts. Read more
    Published 19 days ago by Martha Miller
    4.0 out of 5 stars Keep in mind that this book was written in 1949 ...
    Keep in mind that this book was written in 1949. It is different from today's writings. It must have really been something in it's day.
    Published 22 days ago by dyanne drummond
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