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Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
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The Littlest Angel Hardcover – October 1, 2008


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 and up
  • Grade Level: Preschool and up
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Ideals (October 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0824955757
  • ISBN-13: 978-0824955755
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 8.1 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (123 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #54,893 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The board book edition of The Littlest Angel pares back Charles Tazewell's text for the 1946 original, about a cherub and his present to the Son of God; illustrated with new, cartoonlike watercolors by Rebecca Thornburgh. Ages 4-8.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Grade 1-3?First released in book form in 1946, this story has since appeared in numerous editions. It tells of a small angel who simply can't get with the program no matter how hard he tries until an understanding elder realizes that he is homesick and is able to retrieve a box of his most treasured possessions from "back home." When it comes time for Jesus to be born on Earth, the Littlest Angel gives his precious box to the Baby, but he is worried that God will think his gift too humble. However, God is pleased indeed, and transforms the box into the Star of Bethlehem. The writing style is rather ornate and full of grandiose words and phrases, but some children will love to hear it read aloud. The oil paintings are muted and full of texture, and not at all sentimental. The celestial choir is multicultural, and the Littlest Angel has red shorts peeking out of his robe. Paul Micich's version (Ideals, 1991) has a glossier "greeting-card" look. This reincarnation of the story will be as popular as its predecessors.?EM
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

I read Christmas stories to my Grandchildren every year.
Angel Dalrymple
It is one of my favorite stories and someday I will read it to my children too.
K. Sullivan
This is a beautifully written story with equally wonderful illustrations.
"bubbala"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 29 people found the following review helpful By K. A. Kinney Mullin on January 30, 2004
Format: Board book
I got this book as a Christmas present when I was about 6, and I loved it! My edition of the book has a crimson cover, and the little angel looks like a small blond boy in a pair of light blue footie-pyjamas. I often re-read the book until I was about 9 or 10 and moved on to more big-kid stories.
Now that I am a mother (with a small blond boy who looks a lot like the angel) I've rediscovered the book. What a truly wonderful story. And, just like my mother, I end up reading the last few pages in tears!
I truly don't understand the reviewers who criticized the metaphysics of the book or the "$2 words". First of all, it's a STORY -- a fable -- an allegory. Save the arguments about the origin of angels until your child is in college majoring in theology or philosophy. Main point of the book is -- you are loved as you are, and the best gift is one that is given with love and from the heart.
About the "$2 words" -- how else will a child expand his vocabulary unless he encounters $2 words? Read the book as it is written, and answer the child's question when he says "Mommy, what's deportment?" It's that simple.
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39 of 41 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 30, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This children's book about a young angel in heaven has long been regarded as a classic. It is one of the all-time best sellers of children's books here in the U.S. The story was read over the radio and I heard it as a child in the late 1940s and early 1950s. The little angel, who is acting like all little boys, has to come up with a present for the newly born baby Jesus. It is a beautiful Christmas story and every mischievous boy can relate to this littlest angel. I really find it hard to understand to understand the comments of the 1998 reviewer from Oroville. All children who have to provide gifts for friends or relatives have a hard time coming up with ideas. The littlest angel is no different.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 28, 2001
Format: Library Binding
When I was a child I loved this story. The difficult language (see review below) didn't bother me. I think that it WAS written as a children's story and that back when it was written children accepted difficult language more easily than now. Today we underestimate the power of a child's mind and reasoning and we make the mistake of dumbing down literature and arts for children. But that's another issue..... Regarding the story - as I said, I loved the story as a child, never got the "theology" of this book confused with the theology I learned from church (As I remember it,I knew that people didn't really become angels - or if I thought that at the time I quickly lost that misconception as I became older.)
I picked the book up again as an adult (after not having read it for years) and found that the story now makes me cry.
This is an extremely heart wrenching story for adults, but a comforting one for children.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By shoutgrace on September 10, 2003
Format: Hardcover
'The Littlest Angel' by Charles Tazewell is one of the ten best-selling children's stories of all time. There has been several published editions of this beautiful classic, but none compares to the wonderful award-winning artistry of Paul Micich. Each illustration done in alkyd on canvas. It's the classic story about a little boy angel homesick for earth that was created by Tazewell as a backup for a Screen Guild production crisis. Well, the crisis never materialized, but 'The Littlest Angel' did. The first performance was narrated by Helen Hayes for the "Manhattan at Midnight" Christmas radio show. In 1946, it was released in book form. It was also recorded on Decca records. The magazine, Coronet published it in 1949 and later produced the first film version. Johnny Whitaker (Family Affair) starred as this little angel who couldn't stay out of trouble in the celestial city in the 1969 Hallmark Hall of Fame production. The TV show featured Fred Gwynne (The Munsters, Car 54 Where Are You?), Cab Calloway and E.G. Marshall. 'The Littlest Angel' was in it's 35th print at the time of Tazewell's death in 1972. Time magazine referred to it as the "international classic."
The story goes when this littlest angel arrived in the presence of the Gatekeeper he was four years and six months old. This littlest angel pretend that he wasn't impressed with his new unearthly home. It was that moment on heavenly peace wasn't quite the same. All the heavenly host didn't think he looked like an angel. His tiny halo tarnished and slipping down over his eyes or letting it fall from his head so it would roll down the golden street so he could chase it. Even his wings weren't just right. He's directed to the angel of peace. Dreading his ordeal he goes but he hears merry singing. He meets the Understanding Angel.
Read more ›
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Paul S. Brewer on November 17, 2000
Format: Library Binding
In response to the reviewer from Oroville, CA, who gave this book a low rating, I offer this: I think he made the mistake of seeing The Littlest Angel's Heaven as a place where there could never be any fear or suffering. The author allowed this human reality to enter Heaven with The Littlest Angel so that all of the complacent angels (but really all complacent people on earth) could be reminded that the most angelic being is the innocent one who gives what he or she loves to others and not what she or he hopes will impress others. The metaphor is perfect: wouldn't it be just like God to teach us all that those among us who are thought of (and think of themselves) as the lowest in importance and stature are actually in His heart those who are the most pure? And how could that be taught more profoundly than to let everyone see a little child, with all of his or her fears and sorrows, lovingly comforted and lovingly validated by God? In my opinion, "The Littlest Angel" is the most beautiful, meaningful, and touching Christmas story ever written.
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