The Living Word of God: Rethinking the Theology of the Bible and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$9.94
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: While this book has been loved by someone else, they left it in great condition. Hurry and buy it before someone else does and take advantage of our FREE Super Saver Shipping!!! (there is a chance this book could contain a gift inscription)
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Living Word of God: Rethinking the Theology of the Bible Paperback – January 15, 2008


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, January 15, 2008
$14.92 $9.88

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 291 pages
  • Publisher: Baylor University Press (January 15, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1602580170
  • ISBN-13: 978-1602580176
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,615,259 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

If we believe that Scripture is God's word and that God cannot err, then it follows the Bible is inerrant. But what would have constituted an error in the biblical cultures? What does Scripture testify about itself and the nature of its reliability? Ben Witherington, prolific NT professor at Asbury Seminary, addresses these and related questions, including the formation of the canon, the history of Bible translations, how to choose among the many English-language versions, and basic hermeneutical principles. Almost every reader will disagree at some point, but the vast majority of his positions are compelling and clear. Warmly to be recommended. --Craig L. Blomberg, Distinguished Professor of New Testament, Denver Seminary<br /><br />Whatever Ben Witherington writes goes to the top of my 'must read' list. His new book doesn't disappoint. It's insightful, creative, provocative, and challenging--in other words, it's pure Ben! --Lee Strobel, author of The Case for the Real Jesus

If we believe that Scripture is God's word and that God cannot err, then it follows the Bible is inerrant. But what would have constituted an error in the biblical cultures? What does Scripture testify about itself and the nature of its reliability? Ben Witherington, prolific NT professor at Asbury Seminary, addresses these and related questions, including the formation of the canon, the history of Bible translations, how to choose among the many English-language versions, and basic hermeneutical principles. Almost every reader will disagree at some point, but the vast majority of his positions are compelling and clear. Warmly to be recommended. --Craig L. Blomberg, Distinguished Professor of New Testament, Denver Seminary

About the Author

Ben Witherington III (Ph.D. University of Durham) is Professor of New Testament Interpretation at Asbury Theological Seminary. He is the author of many books, including The Problem With Evangelical Theology (Baylor University Press 2005), Troubled Waters: Rethinking the Theology of Baptism (Baylor University Press 2007), and Making a Meal of it: Rethinking the Theology of the Lord s Supper (Baylor University Press 2007).

More About the Author

Bible scholar Ben Witherington is Amos Professor of New Testament for Doctoral Studies at Asbury Theological Seminary and on the doctoral faculty at St. Andrews University in Scotland. A graduate of UNC, Chapel Hill, he went on to receive the M.Div. degree from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary and a Ph.D. from the University of Durham in England. He is now considered one of the top evangelical scholars in the world, and is an elected member of the prestigious SNTS, a society dedicated to New Testament studies.

Witherington has also taught at Ashland Theological Seminary, Vanderbilt University, Duke Divinity School and Gordon-Conwell. A popular lecturer, Witherington has presented seminars for churches, colleges and biblical meetings not only in the United States but also in England, Estonia, Russia, Europe, South Africa, Zimbabwe and Australia. He has also led tours to Italy, Greece, Turkey, Israel, Jordan, and Egypt.

Witherington has written over thirty books, including The Jesus Quest and The Paul Quest, both of which were selected as top biblical studies works by Christianity Today. He also writes for many church and scholarly publications, and is a frequent contributor to the Beliefnet website.

Along with many interviews on radio networks across the country, Witherington has been seen on the History Channel, NBC, ABC, CBS, CNN, The Discovery Channel, A&E, and the PAX Network.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

54 of 55 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Marc Axelrod VINE VOICE on December 1, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Living Word of God helps us to think through what is meant when we say that the Bible is the divinely inspired word of God. Dr. Witherington mostly works with the New Testament, but there are occasional forays into the Hebrew Bible.

In chapter one, Ben talks about the word of God as an oral message (1 Thessalonians 2:12-13), an Incarnate Person (John 1:14), and as an inscripturated text (2 Timothy 3:16). Taking his cue from 1 Samuel 4-6 and 2 Samuel 6, he points out that the Israelites believed God to be active and present with His word.

He also discusses the mystery of God speaking His word through human writers and human personalities so that it became inscripturated. He spends considerable time with 2 Peter 1:16-21 and 1 Peter 1:23, noting that God's word has life giving potential.

In chapter two, Dr. Witherington talks about the timeless nature of Scripture, that it is the true of word of God for all people in all places and times. Here he critiques NT Wright's book "The Last Word." Wright is right in noting that the Bible is God's way of exercising authority over His people. But Wright is wrong in dodging the issue of whether or not God's word is true and what it means for it to be true.

Ben also observes that the Bible does not merely contain the word of God or serve as a witness to the word of God. It IS the word of God! This means that God spoke eternal truths through individuals living in a particular place and time.

In chapter three, Ben critiques Peter Enns' book on the inspiration of Scripture (the title of this chapter is catchy and creative - "The Ends of Enns"). He applauds Enns for teaching us to be appreciative of the diversity in the Bible and for recognizing that the Bible is a historically conditioned document.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By robert johnston on March 22, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Witherington tackles the difficult, provincial subject of the inspiration and authority of the living word of God ... with emphasis on living word and meaning in the 21st century through the legacy of our 1st century authors.

The book follows the deductive logic of:
1. God is omniscient, omnipresent all powerful, and completely truthful
2. God is able to accurately and truthfully reveal his mind, plan and nature.
3. God has inspired certain human authors to write down his words
4. The authors have accurately done so ... therefore
5. The Bible is the word of God and is accurate and truthful in all it intends to assert.

Then ... Witherington tests it.

The author works both in and between the lines in 1 through 5. He provides the aggressive God seeker with scholarly observations and tools for dealing with the difficulties of meaning and understanding within the framework of sola scriptura and the rational use of the human mind that God provided us to understand the living word. This is not easy. If you have spent years working to grasp the truth in God's word through the writers of scripture, this work will most assuredly provide an expanded perspective and perhaps offer some dissonance with your preconceptions.

I can see that I have highlighted passages in this volume way more than other recent books ... there's much to note in this book. The ideas will take time to play out in my mind. The book is stimulating.

Witherington tells us, that like Jacob ... if you wrestle with the divine long enough, you will walk away with a blessing, but you might have a limp.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Sing Chee Tan on May 1, 2009
Format: Paperback
In this book, Witherington writes in response to 2 unhealthy patterns and attitudes to the bible he sees in today's world - on one hand, we have the fundamental conservatives who insist that everything in the bible is literally true, and understand the "authority" of scripture in a straightforward, literal sense, as demonstrated by Christians who insist the world is flat and square because Revelation speaks of how "angels came from four corners of the earth". On the other hand, we have the liberals, demonstrated by Erhman and his new book "Jesus Interrupted", pointing out that the bible is full of contradictions and cannot be trusted.

In both cases, Witherington argues, there is ironically the same problem - a straightforward, simplistic approach to scripture that neglects fundamental issues that arise in the study of any piece of literature (religious including). In both cases, there is a neglect of the complexity of scripture, with both groups forgetting that texts can and should primarily be understood as they were meant to be understood - eg: we should not be reading a comic strip as if the statements within where academic literature.

For example, liberal theologians often have an issue with the chronological differences between the four gospels - forgetting that biographies written 2000 years ago were not seeking to establish historical chronicity or accuracy, but rather sought to demonstrate and describe a persons life in particular themes. In essense - biography is different from history (especially ancient biogrpahy and ancient history).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?