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The Logic Book 5th Edition

3.4 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0073535630
ISBN-10: 007353563X
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Merrie Bergmann received her Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Toronto and is currently an Associate Professor in the Computer Science Department at Smith College. She has published articles in formal semantics and logic, philosophy of language, and computational linguistics.

James Moor received his Ph.D. in history and philosophy of science from Indiana University and is currently a Professor of Philosophy at Dartmouth College. He has developed software for teaching logic and has published articles in philosophy of science, philosophy of mind, logic, philosophy of artificial intelligence, and computer ethics.

Jack Nelson received his Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Chicago and is currently Associate Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Interim Chair of the Philosophy Department at Arizona State University. He has developed software for teaching logic and has published articles in personal identity, epistemology, and philosophy of science.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 696 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages; 5 edition (July 30, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 007353563X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0073535630
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 1.2 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #131,230 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
There are three main things I like about this book, as compared to other logic textbooks. First, it doesn't assume the reader knows anything about logic at the outset. So, chapter one is the most basic stuff you need to learn. Second, the proof system is a good one. I think students get less confused about discharging assumptions than they otherwise would because of the way this proof system works. Third, the explanations are thorough. As a previous reviewer noted, the chapters get kind of long sometimes. That can be unpleasant. Still, I'd rather have a good, complete explanation (with some examples) than not. I don't find this book disorganized.

One thing I find infuriating is that the 5th edition is very badly edited. Chapters 5 and 10 are FULL of proofreading mistakes. It's unconscionable. I mean, when introducing Modus Tollens, they get it wrong! At the publisher's website you can find a list of errata for chapter 5, but it isn't a complete list, and there are no errata listed for chapter 10 (which is just as bad as chapter 5). I can't believe they put out a new edition that's such a mess.

Still, I think it's a good textbook overall. It starts at the very beginning, but doesn't stop there (like many intro textbooks do). It actually gets you into some interesting logic.
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Format: Hardcover
I must first give a huge thanks to the authors of this textbook (The Logic Book 5e) for writing such an elite introductory logic book. Now, there are two groups of persons whom will read this book. The first group consists of those who are required by their respective college through college coursework. The second group consists of those who are not required but nevertheless are interested in the subject. I belong in the second group. After declaring my major to be in mathematics, my degree plan required me to take an introductory proof course were the required textbook was "Mathematical proof: A transition to advanced mathematics" by Chartrand. The book just mentioned covers sentential and predicate logic in a mere 20 pages and somehow expected its audience to be expert proofers. I immediately ran to the library to seek for additional help in logic and ended up with the following textbooks at hand, "Introduction to logic" by Suppes, "Introduction to logic" by Copi, "Introduction to logic" Gensler, "Logic and Philosophy: A modern introduction" by Hausman, and "The Logic Book" by Bergmann. Out of the bunch, this textbook (The Logic Book 5e) drew my attention the most because its definitions were the most clear and every chapter had an outline summary. It also drew my attention because it covers metalogic, a topic not covered by the others. It took me about twelve hours to complete each of the chapter's exercises at a rate of 4 hours per day for a total of (12*11)= 132 hours of study time in 132/4 = 33 Days. Thus it took me 33 days to complete the entire book (11 Chapters). This book (the Logic Book) taught me how to convert an English argument into symbolic predicate form and from predicate form back to English.Read more ›
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I paid the 122.00 for this book because it was required for a logic course. About a third of the way through it begins to contain major errors in the text, including misstating equations. Also the online solution pages are littered with errors and each page has an "errata" link you need to keep open to check for mistakes in the solutions. You would think at this price they would have someone doing a better job of editing and proofing. It's very frustrating.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book didn't really help me with my symbolic logic course. It's very long winded and doesn't explain things clearly. Also they don't give you answers to their practice problems. They only have some solutions online, if you search 'The logic book solutions' you'll find it. I'd look for another book.
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Format: Hardcover
I used this book for self study in order to solidify my basics of logic after doing undergrad in computer science, which involved some basics of proof theory, automata, proofs in discrete math, etc.

This book is amazingly good. Generally the issue that I've encountered with logic books is that either (a) they are targeted to philosophy students and not mathematically rigorous or (b) They present a mathematical theory of predicate logic as a system that is disconnected from its use in mathematical proofs relating to real-life problems in discrete mathematics.

This book manages amazingly to present a system of formal logic that the student can learn and apply to problems with no previous background in the field (i.e., after this book you can pick up "Axiomatic Set Theory" by Suppes and formalize the proofs if you'd like). However, on top of this, it also presents mathematically complete treatments of issues such as correctness and completeness that are covered in books on mathematical logic, i.e., it answers mathematically, why do all of these constructs work?

I initially got this as part of a group of books on logic but found that this book contained most of what I needed and didn't need the others. In summary, really good!
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