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The Long Road Home: The Autobiography of a Canadian Soldier in Italy in WWII Paperback – March, 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 262 pages
  • Publisher: Stoddart (March 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0773761055
  • ISBN-13: 978-0773761056
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,731,658 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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See all 7 customer reviews
Fred certainly seems to have made out better than average!
Roger Kennedy
It is a story about soldiers who were fiercely proud to be Canadians.
Theodore A. Rushton
Mr.Cederberg brings his experiences to life as you read this book.
ken murray

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Stephan H. Small on August 19, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book ranks with the other great classic memoirs of World War II: The Forgotten Soldier, If You Survive, The Other Side of Time, The Road to Huertgen, and the greatest, Those Devils in Baggy Pants. Cederberg writes in a manner that vividly describes the force and horror of war, painting images in the mind that are not easily forgotten. An excellent read!
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By J. Gifford on June 11, 2000
Format: Paperback
The Long Road Home is the fascinating, if somewhat racy, account of Fred Cederberg's travels from his home in Canada to the war in Italy. Cederberg spares few details of the courage and the horror of war, and shows how love and lust often bloomed among the destroyed buildings and shattered souls. Cederberg's memoir is first-hand and first-rate, a must-read for anyone interested in seeing how our boys fared in the forgotten war in Italy.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ellen on January 3, 2010
Format: Paperback
I first read this book in 1984 after I received a signed copy from the author with kind remarks about my father, Ed Kerr. My father was one of the soldiers in the book. He passed away in December of 1983 and never got to see the book although he did know about the book and had talked with the author, Fred Cederberg. This book helped to answer some questions of Dad's time in Italy as he never talked much about the war. Clearly that time in Italy still had deep emotional pain for him and it is too bad that he never got to read it.
The book is well worth reading and relays the experiences of Canadian soldiers from all parts of Canada and how they had come together with courage to meet the horrors of war. It is also great to see recognition for the so called "D-Day Dodgers" as their contribution to the war was no less valiant.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Roger Kennedy VINE VOICE on December 17, 2008
Format: Paperback
This is a very unique way to write an autobiography. The author has taken his Canadian army WW2 expereinces in Italy to create a novelized work. The book truly reads like fiction with near constant dialogue between the author and his squadies. There is only minimal narrative to describe the general situation. Each chapter begins with a descriptive drawing to set the theme.

I certainly thought this book was a just fiction until the real pictures showed up toward the middle. Here we get to see our protagonist Sgt. Fred Cederberg and some of his associates. For much of the book we get a pretty earthy look at what life was like for a fresh young man just off the praire. For Fred and his companions this was their first time away from Canada. For more than a year the bulk of the Canadian army was stationed in England, awaiting combat postings. This gave Fred and co. a lot of time to become familier with the locals. For many it was their first sexual rite of passage in dealing with members of the opposite sex. Fred certainly seems to have made out better than average!

The book moves along with a very in your face format. The style no doubt intended to show how quickly life was moving then. Not until late 1944 does Fred and the Cape Breton Highlanders finally get into action. Italy was not a glamerous theater, although fighting under the specter of so much history was no doubt surreal in its own way. The constant narrative banter between Fred and his buddies is diffuclt to follow at times, and the mix of nick-names and surnames is confusing. Still, we get an idea of how these young Canadian related and saw things.

Combat comes and goes with sudden violent eruptions, followed by frequent breaks, furroughs and indifferent whoring!
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