Jeremiah 2 Seasons 2002

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Season 1
(277) IMDb 7.1/10

1. The Long Road (Part 1) TV-NR CC

Jeremiah and Kurdy uncover other tribes of young adults whose prolonged and unguided adolescence has divided them into distinct rival social groups.

Starring:
Luke Perry, Malcolm-Jamal Warner
Runtime:
49 minutes
Original air date:
March 3, 2002

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Season 1

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

104 of 113 people found the following review helpful By Monica Hubinette on November 29, 2003
Format: DVD
Why only four stars? Well, I have to knock it down a bit for Sam Egan's episodes because while they did improve as the season went on, they just could never compare to JMS'. I hope in the coming seasons a writer will be able to jump on board and pick up the reins where JMS left off and keep the momentum going. Also, I was a bit disappointed to see that it is not being presented in Widescreen as that would have been the smarter move for MGM to make.
The premise might not be for everyone as it is a dark and grim view of our future but the underlying message is about hope. The characters in this series are at a crossroads -- they can continue to prey off the remains of the "old world" until there is nothing left or they can try to rebuild their world into something better than what came before them.
Season one was a bit of a bumpy ride and perhaps had a slow start but it was worth it in the end. I followed this show after being a fan of Babylon 5 for many years and knew it was going to be worth it if I just held out long enough. Boy, was I was right!
It was fun to pay attention to the little details that were semi-hidden on the first viewing, only to discover that they all contributed to the greater arc of the show. Even the "bad" episodes all tied into the larger picture and became part of a wonderful tapestry called, JEREMIAH.
Some of my favorite episodes that had my head spinning for days at the numerous possibilities presented were FIREWALL, TRIPWIRE and the two-part season finale, THINGS LEFT UNSAID.
If you haven't had a chance to see this show, I strongly urge you to check out this series, as it is one of the most thought-provoking and intelligent shows produced. Give it a season and if you aren't hooked by the end, return it or donate it to your local library. However, I have a feeling that you will either tune into Showtime to see season two or you will be anxiously awaiting the next season's set to arrive at your door.
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32 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Homeschooling Single Mom on August 25, 2004
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
In this series by the creators of Babylon 5 (which I liked much less than Jeremiah), Luke Perry plays Jeremiah, a kind of lost, disaffected mid-20s guy who 15 years earlier lived through what's come to be known as the Big Death - a bioweapon hormone-based virus that 15 years earlier wiped out everyone who was past puberty. So it was that civilization was totally engulfed in post-apocalyptic chaos, since the only people who were left living were the children.

Things haven't changed much in 15 years. In fact, with supplies from "Before" rapidly waning, things may actually be getting worse. There's no electricity or running water or long-distance communication any more, batteries and gasoline are worth their weight in gold, food is hard to come by, and society is basically total anarchy. They're living off the scraps of the world "before."

In the midst of all of this, Jeremiah's on a quest to find the place that his parents told him they were heading to for safety before they disappeared 15 years earlier. He assumes they're dead like all the other adults, but still wants to know "how their story ends."

In the pilot he meets Kurdy, who is played to pitch perfection by Malcolm Jamal Warner as this slightly younger, very lonely guy and they sort of form a team, realizing there's strength in numbers. He's looking for something too - he just isn't sure what that might be yet.

The series is about the really gritty, harsh world they live in, the political battles between the various factions that want to take over, and the hope of a better tomorrow. The story telling is very intimate.
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44 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Curran on November 10, 2003
Format: DVD
I think jeremiah (based on a series of graphic novels by hermann huppen) is an excellent show, and another example of JMS at his best. Although some of season 1 fell a little flat (mostly scripts NOT written by JMS), it is still an excellent show for any that like long, arc based entertainment. I was actually impressed with Luke Perry and Malcolm-Jamal Warner, and I never thought in a million years I would say that. The stories are entertaining, and sometimes frightening (Firewall, Tripwire, etc.) Most importantly, it sets the stage for what has so far been an outstanding season 2. As a HUGE JMS fan, I can't wait for this set to hit shelves.
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49 of 57 people found the following review helpful By AngelosOne on January 28, 2005
Format: DVD
Call me weird, but this show is almost a study of human nature. It vividly portrays the many possible ways humans will react when they have lost everything. Some will turn to crime, victimizing everyone so as to better their own condition. Others will turn to despair, and simply lead lives that ultimately amount to nothing. And sadly, very few will try to help their fellow human beings, at a cost to them.

It is sad to think that if the show's premise really did happen, we would have more "raiders," "psychos," and "animals" than we would have people like Jeremiah.

Anyway, I came upon this show on a Sam Goody store. I was browsing their dvd tv section, when I saw this boxset. I had never even heard of this show before, but I took a chance and bought it on an impulse buy. Let me tell you, it was the best 70 something dollars I've spent.

One of the best sci-fi series in a while, it is smart and well written. All the episodes, while seemingly loosely connected, actually weave a deep story arc about the rebuilding of a civilization gone wrong.

I'm wondering if the "reviewer" Upright Ape has even seen this series. What makes me wonder is when he refers to this series as having pretty FX. I mean, this series is probably the only sci-fi series that doesn't really have much in the way of special FXs. I mean, unless he's calling the big explosion in episode 3 a major FX? As for sayng this series is a knock off of a knock off, is like calling Star Trek a knock off of any other space fairing piece of sci-fi that came before it. If that's the case, I can say that Star Trek is a knock off of the old Lensman series, which most modern sci-fi is derived from.
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