Customer Reviews


28 Reviews
5 star:
 (16)
4 star:
 (5)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:
 (3)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This was a heartwarming memoir of courage, faith and how Brian Kinchen listened to his heart and God ...
Brian Kinchen had been one of the best long snappers in the business, but frankly in an occupation like that a cheerleader would be more noticeable. He just did his job, did it well and walked off the field confident in his ability. His confidence also extended to his family, his faith in God and later in his young students at Parkview Baptist. He'd played in the NFL...
Published on February 10, 2010 by D. Fowler

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Even Belichick Likes This Guy
Jeffrey Marx tells us the remarkable story of 38 year old Brian Kinchen, the long snapper. From his improbable journey from 7th grade religion teacher to the super bowl in a matter of months, Kinchen is an easy person to root for. A great family man, wonderfull husband, and a world class athlete. He has been given a chance from out of the blue to play the sport he loves...
Published on March 7, 2010 by John McLaughlin


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This was a heartwarming memoir of courage, faith and how Brian Kinchen listened to his heart and God ..., February 10, 2010
This review is from: The Long Snapper: A Second Chance, a Super Bowl, a Lesson for Life (Hardcover)
Brian Kinchen had been one of the best long snappers in the business, but frankly in an occupation like that a cheerleader would be more noticeable. He just did his job, did it well and walked off the field confident in his ability. His confidence also extended to his family, his faith in God and later in his young students at Parkview Baptist. He'd played in the NFL for the Browns, the Dolphins . . . both great teams until he ended up as an expendable player. He thought he had it licked when the Packers called him, but all too quickly his luck ran out when they unceremoniously dumped him when they decided they would make do with two tight ends. "Coach wants to see you. Bring your playbook." It was back to Louisiana for Brian because anyone who heard those words was a goner.

He was devastated, but just kept on trying. Rejection after rejection after rejection can break a man, but Brian somehow decided against repeatedly punishing his ego and decided that he would return to school and become a teacher. It was said that "the more things you can do the better chance you have of sticking around," but that only seemed to work early on in his career. With a wife and four kids he needed to be steady, to make and living and teaching would give him stability. Kinchen never figured he was going to end up being a long snapper, but teaching wasn't in his field of vision either, but he knew God does things for a reason and if he was meant to be a teacher, he'd be a good one.

Things were going well, but when he got a call out of the blue from Scott Pioli, a former Cleveland Browns teammate, telling him that New England wanted him to try out for them, he was uptight. He was too old, way too old to go through the heartbreak of rejection again. His wife Lori was encouraging and when he asked his classroom they were behind him. Brian stepped on that plane knowing "God created opportunity." Lori would take over his classroom until he returned. There was only room for one long snapper on the New England Patriots. Would Brian be able to show Him what he was made of after all these years? Could an old dude cut the mustard and more importantly, as one of his students asked, "Does God want him here or does God want him there?"

This was a heartwarming memoir of courage, faith and how Brian Kinchen listened to his heart and God. The reader need not be a football fan to enjoy this memoir, however there is enough "football" to satisfy those who do, save the die hard fan. I couldn't find anything I didn't like about this well rounded memoir and just kept on rooting for the underdog page after page. It was one of those books that say to the reader "you can do it" without laying out page after page of instructions and devotional quotes. Brian Kincher, his family and his classroom are just waiting in the pages of this book to tell you that you can do it too!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspiring Book, January 24, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Long Snapper: A Second Chance, a Super Bowl, a Lesson for Life (Hardcover)
"The Long Snapper" is a captivating novel that any sports fan should read, especially young athletes with aspirations of playing professionally. It will inspire, motivate, and uplift the reader. This story makes dreams like playing professional ball, and excelling at it, seem very plausible and possible. The life story of Brian Kinchen is one that will warm your heart, beautifully retold my Jeffrey Marx. A must read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Even Belichick Likes This Guy, March 7, 2010
By 
This review is from: The Long Snapper: A Second Chance, a Super Bowl, a Lesson for Life (Hardcover)
Jeffrey Marx tells us the remarkable story of 38 year old Brian Kinchen, the long snapper. From his improbable journey from 7th grade religion teacher to the super bowl in a matter of months, Kinchen is an easy person to root for. A great family man, wonderfull husband, and a world class athlete. He has been given a chance from out of the blue to play the sport he loves one final time, and to leave the game on his terms.
I really would have given this book 5 stars if the author didn't focus so much on the religous beliefs of Kinchen. Obviously faith plays a prominent role in his life, but I would have preffered to read more about the football side of things. Especially when you think about what a crucial role he played in such a historical play in the super bowl.
The book is an easy read that should be worth your time. This book was not as Seasons of Life, but it was a solid effort.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars It's a decent book, January 2, 2010
By 
Robert Guyette (De Pere Wisconsin) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Long Snapper: A Second Chance, a Super Bowl, a Lesson for Life (Hardcover)
Marx follows up "Season of Life" with the story of Brian Kinchen, who was called to be the long snapper for the Patriots late in the season they ended up beating the Panthers in the Super Bowl. Kinchen was a 7th-grade Bible teacher at home with his wife and four kids in Louisiana at the time, three years removed from his 13-year NFL career. The book takes the readers through his uncertainty about whether to return, the pressure of the NFL world, and the mental anguish that goes along with all the physical pressure to perform. Overall, it's a nice story, one filled with faith and religious-based themes. It's a story of a good guy who makes good. As far as personal inspiration, it falls well short of "Season of Life", which I absolutely loved. The reader will feel good for Brian and the kids he teaches, but that's about it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars An interesting story from the fringes of the NFL, July 19, 2010
By 
Robert Neely (Moore, SC United States) - See all my reviews
Marx hit the best seller list a few years ago with Seasons of Life, a book about a high school football team. In this book, Marx tells the story of Brian Kinchen, who came back after a three-year absence to fill in as the long snapper on the 2003 New England Patriots for the final two weeks of the regular season and the run to the Super Bowl. Marx tries to imbue tension in Kinchen's struggles as a 38-year-old long snapper, and while that comes off as melodramatic at times, it reflects Kinchen's honest thoughts and doubts throughout. That makes it an interesting read about the periphery of the NFL.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Terrific stuff from Jeffrey Marx, September 25, 2009
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Long Snapper: A Second Chance, a Super Bowl, a Lesson for Life (Hardcover)
A wonderful, enjoyable read about a man who seems to be at the end of his usefullness but comes to find purpose and happiness through a set of extraordinary bits of luck.

"The Long Snapper" is a terrific sports book that is about more than sports. I have found myself reflecting on the lessons included frequently in the week since I finished it: Why are we here on this planet and what is our reason for existing?

Good stuff and highly recommended!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Good entertaining read with a view behind the football glamour...feel good story, September 12, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Long Snapper (Kindle Edition)
Fun and easy read that gives us a glance behind the glamour of football. Also includes good life lessons by a guy who wasn't afraid to say he was afraid.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Great Story, April 27, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Long Snapper: A Second Chance, a Super Bowl, a Lesson for Life (Hardcover)
Quick read of something well written. The author put you in the shoes of the long snapper, you were living his nightmare. Great price and rapid delivery. Thanks to all concerned.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars If you're a football fan, read THE LONG SNAPPER . . . non-fans will find it inspiring, too., June 20, 2012
THE LONG SNAPPER (HarperOne) by Jeffrey Marx is the improbable true story of Brian Kinchen, a 38-year-old father of four and seventh-grade Bible teacher whose professional football career had been over for three years. Or so he thought.

Then, one day out of nowhere, he received the call of a lifetime from the New England Patriots . . . their regular long snapper was injured, and he was being asked to fill-in for the remainder of the 2003 season and the playoffs.

I got caught up in Kinchen's story right from the beginning . . . the author, a Pulitzer Prize-winner for another book I loved, SEASON OF LIFE, had me pulling for this snapper that I didn't even remember from when he played. My lack of recollection apparently wasn't uncommon:

* All of a sudden, everyone was talking about the importance of long snappers. One of the best lines came from Hall of Fame kicker Jan Stenerud, who tried to put into perspective the general indifference toward a snapper until something goes wrong. "It's like a bad intersection," he said. "Most times, there is no stoplight until there's an accident."

As the games progressed deeper into the playoffs, it almost seemed like I was getting more and more into the snapper's head:

* Approaching the line of scrimmage, Brian told himself: I'll remember this moment for the rest of my life. This will define my career. So much for being able to block out everything but this mantra of relaxing and releasing. Making things even worse, his mind then took an abrupt dive to a terribly negative pairing of images: He thought of Trey Junkin throwing the bad snap that cost the New York Giants a playoff game the year before. And he briefly contemplated the ugly, painful concept of throwing the ball over Walter's head. With so much at stake, such a blunder would be dramatically worse even than the Junkin fiasco that had generated so much media attention and had caused so much anguish for the man and his family.

I won't ruin the ending if you don't recall the story; however, this paragraph in the last chapter made me realize that Kinchen had his priorities straight:

* A highlight video offered glimpses of Brian playing tight end and scoring touchdowns in collegiate and NFL games long gone. Family, friends, and former teammates took turns sharing lighthearted jabs and poignant memories. The most intriguing statement of the evening came for the honoree himself. "The success-oriented part of my life is over," Brian said. "Now it's time to move on to significance."

If you're a football fan, read THE LONG SNAPPER . . . non-fans will find it inspiring, too.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent!, October 18, 2011
A very nice read! The story is about a long snapper who got called back to an NFL team after 3 year's retirement and his journey of that season from the tryout to the Super Bowl.

It was easy to read and very entertaining and allowed me to live vicariously the life of a veteran for that one magical season, his trials and his tribulations.

I gave this book 5 stars because it really gives you the inside scoop of what goes on, I mean this is something most of us will never get to experience, but reading about it is the next best thing. I enjoyed the little details of the interactions between him, the other players and the coaches.

I've read many NFL player bios and this mini-bio is one of the ones I like most.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

The Long Snapper: A Second Chance, a Super Bowl, a Lesson for Life
The Long Snapper: A Second Chance, a Super Bowl, a Lesson for Life by Jeffrey Marx (Hardcover - August 18, 2009)
$24.99 $22.49
Usually ships in 2 to 4 weeks
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.