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The Longest Day: Celebrating the Summer Solstice Hardcover – May 13, 2010

4.6 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 1–4—From the traditions of the Chumash Indians of California, to the Big Horn Medicine Wheel of Wyoming and the Polar Bear Swim of Nome, Alaska, this book introduces the celebrations and traditions surrounding the longest day of the year. It tells about the observance of Midsummer's long hours of sunlight, noted in folktales and mythology from ancient times to the present. Colorful cartoon figures in watercolor-washed spreads celebrate in locations from Europe to North America, and a diagram of the shaded positions of the Earth in relation to the Sun gives readers a view of seasonal changes. The text introduces both tradition and some science. A companion to Pfeffer's The Shortest Day (2003), We Gather Together (2006), and A New Beginning (2008, all Dutton), the book concludes with "solstice facts" and crafts. Thirteen celebrations of the sun are included with basic information—just enough to interest young children.—Mary Elam, Learning Media Services Plano ISD, TX
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Like The Shortest Day: Celebrating the Winter Solstice (2003), this fourth book in the collaborators' series about the seasons blends science and social studies. The simple free verse discusses historical solar rituals, including those that honored the Egyptians' sun god, Ra, and the ancient Greek sun god, Apollo. Then there are celebrations today, including the Midnight Sun Festival in Nome, Alaska, where the sun shines for more than 22 hours on the longest day of the year. The open, bright spreads will appeal to younger kids, while independent readers can move on to the suggested resources. A final section offers instructions for two projects. Grades 1-3. --Hazel Rochman
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 7 - 9 years
  • Grade Level: 2 - 4
  • Lexile Measure: NC1010L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 40 pages
  • Publisher: Dutton Juvenile (May 13, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0525422374
  • ISBN-13: 978-0525422372
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 0.4 x 10.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,341,165 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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More About the Author

Wendy Pfeffer has written several other books for children,including From Tadpole to Frog and What's It Like to Be a Fish? both illustrated by Holly Keller. Ms. Pfeffer lives in Pennington, NJ. Holly Keller has illustrated Let's Go Rock Collecting by Roma Gans and You're Aboard Spaceship Earth by Patricia Lauber, as well as her own books starring Horace and Geraldine. Ms. Keller lives in West Redding, CT.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you want your children to learn about the solstices and equinoxes, get this series of books by Wendy Pfeffer. I brought the Winter Solstice book into my son's first grade class to read to them and not only did the teacher love it, but the kids enjoyed the book with it's well written explanations and colorful illustrations. My family is religiously alternative and this book and the ones that follow give a good history of how ancient cultures up to today celebrate the turning of the seasons.
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Format: Hardcover
Stories regarding the Solstice or Equinox are as difficult to find as it would be to peel a turtle! I was completely overjoyed with finding this one to read to my kids. In our home, we read all kinds of materials and teach our kids there are many ways to think about a topic. The kids never forget when the solstice's are and are always reminding us that "it's that time of year" to read this book to them. Course, we read it other times too! I would highly recommended it's purchase.
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Format: Hardcover
Beautifully, colorfully illustrated, from exquisitely drawn butterflies to the smallest details in a two page spread, The Longest Day provides answers to many questions about the summer solstice: its definition, how ancient cultures have interpreted and celebrated it, to current solemnizations. Short pieces on solstice facts (Latin: sun stop), suggested readings and websites, and four activities for students to celebrate the sun's longest day of the year make this an ideal resource for teachers and librarians. There are not enough solstice books written to gratify interest in the topic; this works better as an educative resource book, rather than a read-aloud, and the illustrations are well worth a second and third look.
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Format: Paperback
This book is cute. I find it very basic. It is a factual book about summer solstice and how different groups like tribal indians celebrated. This is a cute book but some kids found it dry and boring.

I like the illustrations and the facts but it does not have rhyming words or anything memorable. This book is more for a child who like the academics rather the one who enjoys a good book.

However, I think this book does have value in the classroom. I would feel very happy to have a copy of this book no display in the book center. This book can be used to help give the children ideas as well as research on a summer solstice project. This book is a little dry to read to most children as recreational book.
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