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The Lorax (Classic Seuss) Audio, Cassette – Abridged, March 10, 1992


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 5 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Kindergarten - 3
  • Series: Classic Seuss
  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers; Pap/Cas edition (March 10, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679822739
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679822738
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 8.1 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (375 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,070,937 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

When Dr. Seuss gets serious, you know it must be important. Published in 1971, and perhaps inspired by the "save our planet" mindset of the 1960s, The Lorax is an ecological warning that still rings true today amidst the dangers of clear-cutting, pollution, and disregard for the earth's environment. In The Lorax, we find what we've come to expect from the illustrious doctor: brilliantly whimsical rhymes, delightfully original creatures, and weirdly undulating illustrations. But here there is also something more--a powerful message that Seuss implores both adults and children to heed.

The now remorseful Once-ler--our faceless, bodiless narrator--tells the story himself. Long ago this enterprising villain chances upon a place filled with wondrous Truffula Trees, Swomee-Swans, Brown Bar-ba- loots, and Humming-Fishes. Bewitched by the beauty of the Truffula Tree tufts, he greedily chops them down to produce and mass-market Thneeds. ("It's a shirt. It's a sock. It's a glove. It's a hat.") As the trees swiftly disappear and the denizens leave for greener pastures, the fuzzy yellow Lorax (who speaks for the trees "for the trees have no tongues") repeatedly warns the Once-ler, but his words of wisdom are for naught. Finally the Lorax extricates himself from the scorched earth (by the seat of his own furry pants), leaving only a rock engraved "UNLESS." Thus, with his own colorful version of a compelling morality play, Dr. Seuss teaches readers not to fool with Mother Nature. But as you might expect from Seuss, all hope is not lost--the Once-ler has saved a single Truffula Tree seed! Our fate now rests in the hands of a caring child, who becomes our last chance for a clean, green future. (Ages 4 to 8) --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

Review, USA Today, April 22, 2008:
"THE LORAX . . . has been a perennial favorite of kids and parents since it was published in 1971."


From the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

"A person's a person, no matter how small," Theodor Seuss Geisel, a.k.a. Dr. Seuss, would say. "Children want the same things we want. To laugh, to be challenged, to be entertained and delighted."

Brilliant, playful, and always respectful of children, Dr. Seuss charmed his way into the consciousness of four generations of youngsters and parents. In the process, he helped millions of kids learn to read.

Dr. Seuss was born Theodor Geisel in Springfield, Massachusetts, on March 2, 1904. After graduating from Dartmouth College in 1925, he went to Oxford University, intending to acquire a doctorate in literature. At Oxford, Geisel met Helen Palmer, whom he wed in 1927. Upon his return to America later that year, Geisel published cartoons and humorous articles for Judge, the leading humor magazine in America at that time. His cartoons also appeared in major magazines such as Life, Vanity Fair, and Liberty. Geisel gained national exposure when he won an advertising contract for an insecticide called Flit. He coined the phrase, "Quick, Henry, the Flit!" which became a popular expression.

Geisel published his first children's book, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, in 1937, after 27 publishers rejected it.

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize in 1984, an Academy Award, three Emmy Awards, three Grammy Awards, and three Caldecott Honors, Geisel wrote and illustrated 44 books. While Theodor Geisel died on September 24, 1991, Dr. Seuss lives on, inspiring generations of children of all ages to explore the joys of reading.

Amazon Author Rankbeta 

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#48 Overall (See top 100 authors)
#48 in Books
#48 in Books

Customer Reviews

This has a great message, great story.
Earthy Mama
I love this book and read it every night to my son.
DogMom25
This is a great classic book from Dr. Seuss.
Amanda McGarrell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

261 of 275 people found the following review helpful By Michael W. Howe on November 9, 2000
Format: Hardcover
12 years ago at the old age of eight, I received this book and found it quite great! My parents had read me of this and of that, of Berenstein Bears and a Cat in a Hat. This book in itself makes quite a statement, sounding nothing quite like a drawn-out old lament. The story involved something unlike you or me, a being called a Once-ler, who we never do see. He tells his story from a boarded old store, and will not answer you if you knock at his door. But for the right price, he'll tell you the tale, and here is that story, in some minor detail: While travelling across lands and seas, the old once-ler found the Truffula trees. When he chopped down one tree there was a loud thump, and the Lorax appeared right out of that stump. He warned the Once-ler of what he was for, but the Once-ler didn't listen and thought him a bore. With cutting down trees, was born a Thneed, a so-called "Fine thing that all people need." The Once-ler made many, and money to spare, but his doing caused many to sadly despair. He polluted the air, he gummed up the pond, he cut down the trees til they soon were all gone. A sad story yes, but sad is to say, such examples of Once-lers can be found today. Dr. Seuss wrote this story out of will and good faith, but unless we heed it's warning, it may be too late. -Michael Howe, 11/10/00
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66 of 69 people found the following review helpful By Jayson Shelley on October 11, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Dr. Seuss's The Lorax is a fantastic story by one of the most lovable, creative children's books authors ever. In the story, Seuss presents a statement concerning the environment in his own original way. Of course, the book would not be complete without those witty rhymes and colorful illustrations. The Lorax "speaks for the trees" and tries to save the Truffula trees from the greedy Once-ler. The Lorax protects the trees and all the creatures that inhabit them. When the Once-ler comes and desires to cut down the Truffula trees, the Lorax tries to stop him, but he fails. The Once-ler cuts down every last Truffula tree, pollutes the environment, and drives all the creatures, including the Lorax, off the land. The story does end on a positive note, but to learn what it is, you must read the book for yourself.
Because The Lorax was first published in 1971, it is easy to believe that the story is referring directly to the environmental movement of the 1960's. The story clearly illustrates the themes of conservation, love, and respect for the land. The author grabs the reader's attention in the beginning of the story by starting in the future and then narrating the past. The reader sees the death and bareness of the land first and then learns the causes for the current state of the environment. Seuss approaches the subject in a blunt and obvious critique of the methods used to strip resources from the land. This story sends a simple, yet powerful statement about the world in which we live.
Because of the book's strong message concerning the environment (clear-cutting forests in particular,) this children's book has found itself on the Banned Books List. The reason is simple. Several logging companies feel threatened by the book and its message.
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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 6, 1998
Format: Hardcover
I grew up on Dr. Suess books(I even learned to read with one), and I think he is one of the greatest children's authors ever. His hypnotic phrasing and wonderful illustrations are enough to delight children and adults as well (my brothers and I still enjoy looking through our old Suess favorites). In my senior year of high school, I had the opportunity to go with two other classmates to a local elementary school on a weekly basis to teach basic lessons on honesty, friendship, etc. When we taught our lesson on the environment, I brought "The Lorax" to read to the class. To my surprise, when I asked who in the class had read the story, only three out of the 28 students had. Many looked skeptical, thinking it was a little kid's book, but once I started reading, the entire class was mesmerized. After I was finished with the story, we had the most lively question-and-answer session that we had ever had-the story really hit home with the kids and brought our planet'! s ecological crisis into terms that they could understand. Afterward, many of the children asked where they could get a copy of "The Lorax". Thank you to Dr. Suess for a masterpiece of children's literature!
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By T. W. Fuller on November 14, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Children used to Dr. Seuss' lighthearted, whimsical stories filled with wacky names and places will undoubtedly perceive a vast difference with "The Lorax". It still contains the wacky names, places, and rhymes, so characteristic of Seuss, but with one blatant overtone. This story goes all out to show the devestating consequences of human greed, and what can happen to the environment when humans misuse and take advantage of nature and natural resources.
The story begins when a boy comes to the home of a peculair creature called Once-ler. The boy wants to know about something called the Lorax; "what it was", and "why it was there". After paying the Once-ler a small fee, he narrates the story for the boy. The pictures incorperated into the story are also poignant; for, as we see in the beginning, the small town in which the Once-ler lives is very grey and barren.
However, as the Once-ler begins his story, the pictures become brighter, more cheerful, and colorful, as we see how the town once looked, long, long ago. There were animals, birds, green grass ... and trees!
The Once-ler says, "I came to this glorious place. And I first saw the trees. The Truffula trees". Transfixed by these trees, the Once-ler cuts one down to make a "Thneed". Now, a Thneed is supposed to be a useful thing, which people can find many uses for. Shortly after the first tree is cut down, the Lorax appears. He explains that he talks on behalf of the trees, because the trees cannot talk for themselves. "They have no tongues".
The Lorax is very upset at what the Once-ler has done. But the Once-ler ignores him, and continues to cut down the trees to make Thneeds, until all the trees have been cut down.
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