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The Lord of the Hallows: Christian Symbolism and Themes in J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter Paperback – July 15, 2009

ISBN-13: 978-1432741129 ISBN-10: 1432741128

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 118 pages
  • Publisher: Outskirts Press (July 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1432741128
  • ISBN-13: 978-1432741129
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 9.2 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,950,208 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Author

The Lord of the Hallows: Christian Symbolism and Themes in J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter is a published record of my lectures on the deeper meaning of the Harry Potter novels. These presentations were given at the Babel Con Science Fiction and Fantasy Convention in Baton Rouge, LA (2007 and 2008), the PORTUS 2008 Harry Potter Symposium in Dallas, TX, the Con du Lac Science Fiction Convention in Lake Charles, LA (2009), and the AZKATRAZ 2009 Harry Potter Symposium in San Francisco, CA. After numerous requests from Harry Potter fans and convention attendees to publish my work, I decided to write The Lord of the Hallows. I hope you will enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed writing it. It has certainly been a labor of love.

Customer Reviews

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See all 6 customer reviews
I enjoyed this book very much,it was well written and easy to understand.
W. Ferguson
Roper is a talented writer that obviously double checks all her facts, and she writes her literary criticism in a very professional and scholarly way.
JW
Certainly, those afraid of Harry Potter's alleged witchcraft should read both this and John Granger's book on God in Harry Potter.
Valerie Frankel

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Logospilgrim on November 19, 2009
Verified Purchase
This wonderful book will delight not only Christians, but all students of spirituality and mythology. It is filled with fascinating arcane information, yet the author's engaging and descriptive style results in a text that never feels weighed down by its rich content matter. I learned quite a few intriguing facts about a variety of Christian legends; Ms. Roper's knowledge of symbolic lore and Christian history is impressive (I was particularly enchanted by her chapter about the Deathly Hallows, or holy relics -I loved the parallel she drew between The Elder Wand and The Spear of Destiny, that is, the spear reputed to have been used to pierce Christ's side). Anyone interested in literature and religion will find this volume to be a valuable addition to their library.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Fricka on July 25, 2009
I've just bought and read The Lord of the Hallows by Denise Roper. I was fortunate enough to hear her presentation of the themes found in both Tolkien and Rowling, at the recent Azkatraz convention in San Francisco, and was very interested in the comparisons she made between certain elements between the two authors. For example,she illustrated that there are croppings of Hobbit names used throughout Rowling's books. Longbottom leaf is a type of tobacco(or stronger, wink wink) that is cultivated by the Hobbits, and then we find that name used by Harry's friend Neville, in the Harry Potter books. Puddifoot, as in Madam Puddifoot's shop in Hogsmeade, is also a name of a family of Hobbits. In short, readers who enjoy Tolkien's books and Rowlings will enjoy reading Roper's book as well.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Valerie Frankel on July 19, 2010
Denise Roper sure knows her stuff. This book analyzes Christian symbolism in Harry Potter, focusing on magical animals, names, hallows, horcruxes and more. There are many links to Lord of the Rings and Narnia that a casual reader might not notice, but Ms. Roper draws them all out for us. How is the weasel significant? WHat about Madame Pudifoot's? While many have observed Harry and Frodo make the ultimate, Christ-like sacrifice, Ms. Roper digs deep, linking their journeys with Bible passages and deliberate allusions from JK Rowling. She uses interviews, letters, and lesser-known works from Rowling and Tolkien to make her case, offering a deep, detailed analysis for fans of both series. This is also one of the few books to really take apart Deathly Hallows, the last of the series. Certainly, those afraid of Harry Potter's alleged witchcraft should read both this and John Granger's book on God in Harry Potter. Fun, easy analysis for a variety of audiences.
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