The Lost Ark of the Covenant and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$4.00
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Like New in shrinkwrap! Ships immediately from an amazon warehouse. PRIME AND SUPER SAVER SHIPPING.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Lost Ark of the Covenant: Solving the 2,500-Year-Old Mystery of the Fabled Biblical Ark Hardcover – February 26, 2008


See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$4.63 $0.01
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Award-Winning Historians
Browse books by celebrated historians including Joseph J. Ellis, Lawrence Wright, and more. Learn more
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: HarperOne (February 26, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061371033
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061371035
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,661,898 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

In 1993, Parfitt, a professor of Jewish studies in London, published Journey to the Vanished City, a fascinating look at the Lemba people of South Africa, who believed they were descended from Jews. In the intervening years, through use of DNA, the Lemba’s claim was proven correct. Here, Parfitt, a real-life Indiana Jones, details another quest, his attempt to solve the mystery of the Ark of the Covenant, a Jewish artifact said to have contained the Ten Commandments. Parfitt’s narrative fits the Indiana Jones label; it’s thoroughly cinematic in tone, with scenes of heartstopping action and featuring characters so quirky they feel more fictional than real. (With no notes, and the disclaimer that names and personal details have been changed, who can say for sure?) But the book also has strong scholarly underpinnings that explain the mystical nature of the Ark, its possible uses, and why and how it could still exist. The resolution of the mystery again evokes Raiders of the Lost Ark, but it could have real-world significance, and it just might lead to another fascinating adventure. --Ilene Cooper

Review

“It’s worthy of a Spielberg epic: an intrepid British don’s 20-year mission to find the Lost Ark of the Covenant.” (Daily Mail)

“Parfitt’s passionately crafted new theory, like his first, could eventually be proven right…” (Time Magazine)

“Parfitt’s scholarly, fascinating work explains and explodes a pervasive myth.” (The Times)

“Deemed ‘the British Indiana Jones’ by the Wall Street Journal, Parfitt is both scholar and adventurer. This real-life account [is] a gripping…yarn. Recommended.” (Library Journal)

Customer Reviews

It is full of well researched details.
Michel Bruder
It has some interesting parts, but nothing that I would consider relevant to the present whereabouts of the Lost Ark of the Covenant.
H. Diggs
I would watch this first, and then decide if you would like to commit to reading the entire book.
Alan M. Polansky

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

43 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Rob Weiner on March 6, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I am surprised that no one else has reviewed this book yet. So, as unqualified as I my be, I have decided to do so. "Lost Ark of the Covenant" is a page-turner containing new ideas about the whereabouts of the Ark of the Covenant. While it may be an exciting travel book, the factual information seems a little iffy. I have trouble believing what Mr. Parfitt thinks to be the Ark actually is. I'll grant its amazing that the Lemba of southern Africa have the "Moses Gene" and I don't doubt that they did come from Yemen and possibly Israel before that. But the idea that their 'ngoma' or wooden drum is the Ark seems a little far fetched to me. Additionally, the author's premise that the Ark actually was an early "weapon of mass destruction" seems a little more than unlikely.
Another thing about the book that bothered me was that Mr. Parfitt never tells whether or not the Gogodala of Papa New Guinea are of Jewish descent or not. He did the DNA testing. Why not include the results in the book, positive or not? This only leaves the reader frustrated.
Some events in "The Lost Ark" seem to work out too perfectly. It seems to me that he disregards some Ark locations too quickly (eg. It can't be under the Temple Mount because people have been looking there for so long.)
While I don't believe Parfitt's theory, I still had a hard time putting the book down. The real-life adventure was exciting, and the history (most of it) piqued my interest. I would certainly recommend reading this book. Perhaps Mr. Parfitt can convince you of his theory and I am just a stubborn reader.
I'm not sure why this book hasn't made a bigger splash. It seems that recently every year around March/April there is a new biblical mystery/conspiracy in the news (Da Vinci Code, Tomb of Jesus.) I have a feeling this may be this years, but so far "The Lost Ark" hasn't reached the limelight.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 28 people found the following review helpful By H. Diggs on March 13, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you are looking for an authoritative and informative book on the Ark of the Covenant, my advice is for you to keep looking and pass this one by. If however, you are looking for information about the lost decendents of ancient Isreal, this is for you. I also get the distinct impression that Mr. Parfitt is one of those types that only looks for those facts that fit his particular theories. I can't quite buy into them. Mainly because he doesn't seem to have any respect for anyone's religous beliefs and constanly refers to them as "cults". He doesn't believe that the ancient Isrealites had the tools, material or ability to construct a gold covered ark, even though they were the artisans and craftsmen of Eygpt and had all of the spoils of Eygpt with them. Doesn't seem to bother him that they made a golden calf to worship though. Wonder how they did that? He discounts all the testomony of the power and presence of God and replaces it with a crude wooden drum and theories of gunpowder or some other inflammable material. If you are interested in the history of the Lemba, by all means buy this book. It has some interesting parts, but nothing that I would consider relevant to the present whereabouts of the Lost Ark of the Covenant.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Julie Merilatt VINE VOICE on February 9, 2011
Format: Paperback
While Mr. Parfitt's claims of finding a representation of the legendary Ark of the Covenant seem somewhat inconclusive, this book and his journey is more about the symbolism of the Ark and its lore throughout the world and the ages. He did a great job illustrating the context of the legend from a number of religious and historical texts. He also questions what the Ark itself is/was specifically. There are references of it as a box carrying sacred objects such as the Ten Commandments, a drum or a weapon, and even that there were multiple Arks over the course of three millennia. He concludes that our archetypal image of the Ark as a golden sheathed box crowned with cherubs is inaccurate.

More specifically, Parfitt explores the migration of a Jewish tribe from Israel to Africa and the idea that the Ark could have travelled with them to protect it from the enemies of Israel. He examined linguistic and cultural similarities and once the technology became available, used DNA testing to prove that these African people claiming Jewish decent did in fact share a common ancestor with a line of Jewish priests. He also chased some dead ends in Papua New Guinea and some misguided folklore in other parts of Africa and the Middle East, but I must admit there were some pretty amazing connections to be more than just pure coincidence.

The writing itself was decent, and I could appreciate Parfitt's penchant for adventure, scholarship and drinking, but it often got bogged down with some esoteric concepts. The end of his search for this profound religious artifact was somewhat anticlimactic, though it did illustrate how what he uncovered could represent what the Ark initially symbolized thousands of years ago and how that idea evolved in different parts of the world.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A. Porshin on March 6, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I loved reading this book. I found Parfitt's study very intriguing and his ability to link clues together fascinating. I am just curious why he left his treasure where it was for others to fight over...why didn't he take it where other scholars could study it? There is much detailed information in the first chapters. Towards the end, just when the story is heating up, he seems to end the book abruptly.

However, still a fascinating read! I highly recommend!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.