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The Lost Explorer: Finding Mallory on Mt. Everest Paperback – May 8, 2001


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; Touchstone ed edition (May 8, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684871521
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684871523
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (62 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,011,329 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Jon Krakauer author of Into Thin Air An utterly riveting, immensely enjoyable read. -- Review

About the Author

Conrad Anker is a professional mountaineer who has climbed around the world, from the Himalayas to Antarctica to Patagonia. He lives in Bozeman, Montana.

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Customer Reviews

I enjoyed this book very much and it is well written.
Dayna A. Safranek
The book concludes with Anker's account of his own summit climb, his near-disastrous descent, and his best speculation about George Mallory and Andrew Irvine's fate.
Edward W. Trieste
I have always enjoyed reading non-fiction and especially those concerning exploration.
lady in learning

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Tim Smith on July 3, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I became interested in finding out more about George Mallory after watching a television documentary describing the discovery of his body in May,1999. When I learned that one of the climbers on that expedition had co-authored a book describing the historical find I knew I wanted to read it.
By reading it, a lot can be learned about climbing, even by a "grounded" reader like myself. Being a non-climber, I really wasn't aware of the mystique and high regard in which Mallory is held within the community of men and women who challenge themselves to the extremes of mental, emotional and physical endurance by pitting themselves against the unforgiving mountains "because they are there".
The book provides extensive insight into the psyche of Mallory and Conrad Anker, the man who found his body. The talent to climb, the courage to confront the ultimate challenges and the respect and awe held for the mountains, especially Everest, seem to be shared by both.
In my estimation the book accomplished what it set out to do. Most importantly, it preserved Mallory's legend. He was treated with reverance and his feats and accomplishments become more mind boggling when you consider the technological limitations with which he worked.
It helped provide insight into why people climb mountains. Mountaineering taps into the competitive nature of man; Everest is seen as an opponent that needs to be conquered. It is the proving ground that measures a person's mettle and stimulates the instinct for self survival.
The book spends time desribing Andrew Irvine, incredible in his own right, and sheds light on why he was chosen as Mallory's partner for that fateful climb.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 28, 1999
Format: Paperback
More an engaging history of early Everest exploration than a record of the expedition to find Mallory & Irvine, this book still will be of interest to climbers and arm-chair mountaineers. A few proofing errors in the later chapters detract from the quality and several of the photos could use arrows and annotations. It seemed as if the author and publisher rushed this book through to get it on the shelves before Christmas.
All that said, the plates are the best collection of early Everest illustrations that I've seen. I found the account readable and enjoyable. When the text finally got the search team on the mountain, it was captivating.
Of course, their findings raise more questions: where is Irvine and the missing camera, what happened to Mallory's watch? I'd like to know how close they were to the original camp when Mallory fell. And after they found Mallory, why didn't they spend more time looking for Irvine?
I'll probably read the other titles about the search for Mallory & Irvine just because of my mountaineering background. I'll be curious to see how they compare.
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34 of 39 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 30, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This is the best of the Mallory books for several reasons. It is by far the best written, and it also has the most believable, most rational analysis of Mallory's disappearance.
Anker did not sell out. He simply didn't agree with the party line that Hemmleb/Simonson/Johnson were trying to foist on the world--that Mallory climbed Everest--so he decided to do his own book, in order that his own ideas could find an audience. If you read this book carefully, and compare it to the horrible writing and irresponsible speculation of the Hemmleb/Simonson/Johnson book, you will appreciate what an important book "The Lost Explorer" is.
It's sad that the Hemmleb-Simonson camp has launched a smear campaign against Anker. If Anker hadn't been on the expedition, they would never have found Mallory, they would never have climbed the Second Step, and they would never have reached the summit.
I am glad Anker wrote this book. If you read it, you'll be glad too.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 1, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book provides a great story about an incredible discovery. I really enjoyed the balance between Roberts' historical perspective and Anker's first-hand experience. While we may never know for sure whether Mallory and Irvine made the summit, or what exactly happened on their final attempt to reach the summit, this book provides solid information and analysis via thoroughly enjoyable writing, which is more than we've ever had before. Excellent job!
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Paul Burgin on November 21, 1999
Format: Paperback
Peter Firstbrook, the author of this book thinks that it's possible. Ironically however, if they did make it, it might have helped cause their deaths. By the time they would have got there it would have been early evening at the earliest. Then tiredness, exhaustion, dehydration combined might have caused Mallory's fall to his death. The irony being that they were at that point quite close, less than 200 ft, from Camp VI, from where they set off that morning. This book is divided into two parts. Part one is a biography of George Mallory, and a brief history of Himalayan mountanerring expeditions up till the 1920s, the second is an account of the expedition that found Mallory's body earlier this year. Worth reading, if only to look at the possible scenearios and evidence
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