The Lost Language of Plants and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$12.89
Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.95
  • Save: $7.06 (35%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Trade in your item
Get a $2.25
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Lost Language of Plants: The Ecological Importance of Plant Medicines for Life on Earth Paperback – March 1, 2002


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.89
$11.97 $9.99

Frequently Bought Together

The Lost Language of Plants: The Ecological Importance of Plant Medicines for Life on Earth + The Secret Teachings of Plants: The Intelligence of the Heart in the Direct Perception of Nature + Plant Intelligence and the Imaginal Realm: Beyond the Doors of Perception into the Dreaming of Earth
Price for all three: $44.03

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing; First Edition edition (March 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9781890132880
  • ISBN-13: 978-1890132880
  • ASIN: 1890132888
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #26,322 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Stephen Harrod Buhner is an award-winning author of seven books on nature, indigenous cultures, the environment, and herbal medicine (including Sacred Plant Medicine ). His work has appeared or been profiled in publications throughout North America and Europe, including The New York Times, CNN, Good Morning America, Common Ground, HerbalGram and other herbal magazines, and many more. He travels throughout the United States teaching about herbal medicine, the sacredness of plants, and the intelligence of nature. He is the author of The Lost Language of Plants: The Ecological Importance of Plant Medicines to Life on Earth (2003), and Healing Lyme: Natural Healing and Prevention of Lyme Borreliosis and Its Coinfections (2005).


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

This book is absolutely wonderful and exquisitely written.
BibliophilePagan
If you live on the planet you need to read this book to begin to SEE and FEEL plants again... this book could change your life.
Livia Coletta
Even simple things such as taking an aspirin affects the world around us.
Scott Harshman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

78 of 82 people found the following review helpful By Cathleen M. Walker VINE VOICE on February 26, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is one of the best books I have read in a long time. Thoughtful, poignant, well written, it even brought me to tears at some points. I learned so many things I didn't know, which doesn't happen for me very often, sad to say. I have a pretty good idea how destructive man has been to the environment, but there were chapters in this book that opened my eyes even further, particularly when it comes to the ripple effect of the pharmaceutical industry.

But more than that, the author discusses with due respect the indigenous history of working with plants and how dismissing that history in the name of profit, power and control serves no one.

This book is truly a labor of love that speaks from every page. I had no idea what a page-turner it would turn out to be. Consider yourself forewarned.

...geminiwalker
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
73 of 80 people found the following review helpful By Kiko Denzer on March 2, 2003
Format: Paperback
A couple of summers ago, in the midst of a blackberry glut, I decided I should harvest some Oregon Grape berries to mix with blackberry for a good, sour jelly. But I needed a whole patch, and a few individual plants were all I knew. Before I got around to looking, I found myself on a walk, huffing and puffing up my favorite steep hill. In the middle, I just stopped - for no obvious reason - and looked up. All around me, in the midst of the salal, was a thicket of Oregon Grape, laden with berries! My brother-in-law and I came back and filled up buckets. The deep purple, astringent berries made a stunning blend with the blackberries, and the jelly set up beautifully. But most stunning, even after we ate it all up, was how the plant showed itself in a place I'd been through a hundred times before without ever noticing it.
Is that language? Maybe not But even if it only meant that I could make my jelly, it did have meaning, and to convey meaning is, after all, the purpose of language. The Lost Language of Plants is a book about meaning: not whether plants speak, or even how they speak, but what they say to us and we to them.
Buhner says there is meaning to Life, and that plants communicate it clearly and fully through their chemistry and biology. In human industrial culture, however, the common values of Life - birth, growth, death, and renewal - have mutated into progress, wealth, and poverty - the trinity of economic growth. As a result, billions of years of evolution are being pushed to favor waste over renewal, and death over Life. Under human control, Life is a mere by-product of a soul-less, cosmic machine that happens to have produced "resources" that we can consume until they're gone or until Life ends, whichever comes first.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By catbird on June 4, 2002
Format: Paperback
I am halfway through this book and plan to start right over again when I'm finished. I think that this is one of the most fascinating things I have ever read. BUT, if you asked me what it is about I'd have a hard time explaining it. Yes, it is about how chemicals are seeping into the ecosystem, and how we might view plant medicine as an alternative etc, but it's about so much more than that. It's scientific and shamanistic at the same time, merging two ways of thinking into one. Really I should say, it explains one type of epistemology in the language of another. I really like it and it's changing my way of looking at the life around me. Also, my perception of God/spirituality etc. Check it out. PS. Mr Buhner thanks for such an interesting and thought provoking read! You are so right! KM
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
39 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Charles Andrew Wingard on December 24, 2004
Format: Paperback
Stephen tackles the prescription drug industry without painting a doom and gloom scenario. He presents facts in a loving way so that the reader can understand why plants are important. Stephen sees a problem and offers a solution. A great book for anyone worried about prescription drugs, on prescription drugs, or interested in plants.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Byron E. Butchart on December 20, 2002
Format: Paperback
This is a book you should read, and unlike many "should" reads, this one is a real pleasure. Stephen has taken on a huge task with this book, and almost tries to cover too much ground, but he pulls it off with style and art. Once you get past the wonderful language and the perceptive viewpoint you will stumble on a scathing and accurate depiction of what mainstream medicine is doing to the environment. It is a picture that makes "Silent Spring" seem tame in comparison, and the book as a whole will lift you up out of your chair and get you moving to find answers.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By "medicinehillherbs" on July 6, 2002
Format: Paperback
Fascinating, informative and eye-opening, "The Lost Language of Plants" by Stephen Buhner shows us the life of evolving plant chemistries, revealing the science in the `magic' of plants used as medicine by 4 of 5 people on the planet. A merciless exposé following the path of medical effluence through our soil, water, and air clearly illustrates effects on molecules as they change to affect generations to come... generations of all life: bacteria, plants, wildlife, and humans, as we reproduce. We have been participants in a medical experiment of reductionist technology for a few hundred years and the results are not widely known or circulated. Buhner's well-researched and brilliantly conceived presentation refutes any denial one may have harbored before reading this book.

Western thinking has its own way of seeing things and we live in the cradle of all that it produces. We see ourselves as an advanced society and display little use or respect for our elders, or those who have gone before us. Buhner's language unveils the illusion embedded within our language and our thinking, embodies ancient understanding and functional relationships, and reveals the complex communication between all parts of the eco-system. Stephen Buhner, as scientist, intellectual, storyteller and shaman, teaches us a language so that we may see differently. This is a passionate call to reconnect to our biocentric origins, to nature, to save our planet and ourselves.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews