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The Lost Prophecies (Medieval Murderers) Paperback – Bargain Price, July 1, 2008


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Product Details

  • Series: Medieval Murderers
  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster UK (July 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1847370934
  • ASIN: B006G8GUMC
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,836,343 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In the Medieval Murderers' absorbing fourth serial historical (after 2007's House of Shadows), six British mystery authors—Bernard Knight, Ian Morson, Michael Jecks, Philip Gooden, Susanna Gregory, C.J. Sansom—chart the impact of the Black Book of Brân over the centuries. In 574, the infant Brân washes ashore in Ireland with the eponymous book of prophesies, leading local churchmen to believe him to be demonic. More than 600 years later, the sinister tome causes havoc in Exeter when coroner John de Wolfe and cleric Thomas de Peyne must cope with priests who have caught gold fever during a killing spree. Brân's manuscript makes an implausible side trip to snowy 1262 Russia, but it's soon back in England amid mayhem in Westminster Abbey. The prophetic book, which has a habit of bringing out the worst in people, winds up in an appropriately apocalyptic future of polar ice melt, nuclear war, earthquakes and floods. (Feb.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

"Monks, mists, madness, taverns: the evocation of a strange but familiar Other Britain shrouded in time . . . A must for historical crime buffs."  —Tangled Web


"If your taste is for well-written crime and well-written historical fiction, they are combined tantalizingly here."  —Crime Time


"Absorbing fourth serial historical."  —Publishers Weekly
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Just A Girl on June 11, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I like these Medieval Murders collections of short mysteries on a theme. They are just long enough to read one story before bedtime but keep the same theme. It's a great premise.

In this case, the premise is about a lost book of prophecies written by a "mad" man and hidden before he disappears.

This particular set of stories didn't quite seem to mesh as well as some others in this series (The Tainted Relic, for example).

However, for some quick, light reading it is very enjoyable.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By alldayReader on December 30, 2008
Format: Paperback
Six writers of historical mysteries and thrillers come together in The Lost Prophecies to imagine the far-reaching consequences of a book foretelling future events. This book is fabulous: to quote one of its characters, "A combination of history, religion, and mysticism was like manna from heaven" to me.

The events prophesied in The Lost Prophecies originate in a small black book, laid out in enigmatic and beautifully lettered Latin: they are the ravings of a possessed orphan in sixth century Ireland. Easily twisted around true events, the prophecies of the little black book seem to hold truth within their twists and turns. Six mysteries of intrigue and treason, rebellion and murder result over two millenia and we the reader are brought to realize truly the power of the written word.

The Lost Prophecies captivates as it moves through the past and forward in our our current century to a future of small but determined hope for mankind. This book has its roster of heroes, good decent people who look for answers beyond (ironically) the written word and the popular lines and doctrines, people who find truth in their hearts, sustenance in their goodness, and knowledge through their very human failings. Maybe such heroes are mythical but I don't think so. We see something familiar in them, something to hope for and aspire to. And that is the true power of words.

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Format: Paperback
Gooden shows promise as an Author I might like to read in the future, so I gave it 2 stars.

I can appreciate the superstitious world of A.D. through the 1600s; didn't see too much wrong with the storylines up through Act 5, except for one possible fatal flaw: If the Church of those ancient periods had found a book like that, they would very likely have burned it as heretical/not a part of Scriptural canon and been done with it. End of Story. But the most difficult to swallow was C.J.'s "end of days" scenario.

Keep in mind that the reader is persuaded to believe that the prophecies all come to pass up through Act 5, complete with the book's author mysteriously vanishing into thin air in the prologue. And, they come to pass despite the attempts of a few loonies to change the outcome of some of the earlier prophetic writ to favor themselves.

However, Act 6 deteriorates into something totally different. Without giving too much away, the storyline steps away from mystery (what the reader really wanted) into the increasingly tired mantra of "environmentalism good, Christianity bad" drivel. Atheism (or at best, Agnosticism) wins the day for humanity.

Where earlier reviewers see the power of the word (myth) controlling human behavior, I simply see a bit of modern existentialism oozing a little through the first "acts" of the book, and then gushing out in the end.
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By Odnanref on February 11, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Very nice the way the different writers kept the base line well connected. I also found the description of the medieval landscape very good.
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