Customer Reviews


17 Reviews
5 star:
 (11)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


43 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So...you already know all there is to know about Jesus?
What DID Jesus really teach? Most people try to answer that question by referring exclusively to the New Testament. According to Keith Akers, that's where the problem starts. He shows how early Christians divided into factions almost from the beginning with strong doctrinal differences separating them. His book examines those differences under the light of the many...
Published on March 9, 2001 by Jim Catano

versus
44 of 64 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Confusion on Ebionites
Please do not pursue this book as a source of Ebionite thought. The book is worth reading with a certain understanding. Firstly, it is an apologetic book for vegetarianism with a religious "seal of approval" applied. Secondly, it has a very useful bibliography (yet, Keith fails to heed the sources he cites). And thirdly, he does understand some pivotal subjects concerning...
Published on April 22, 2003 by shemayah phillips


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

43 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So...you already know all there is to know about Jesus?, March 9, 2001
By 
Jim Catano (Provo, UT USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Lost Religion of Jesus: Simple Living and Nonviolence in Early Christianity (Paperback)
What DID Jesus really teach? Most people try to answer that question by referring exclusively to the New Testament. According to Keith Akers, that's where the problem starts. He shows how early Christians divided into factions almost from the beginning with strong doctrinal differences separating them. His book examines those differences under the light of the many writings from the first four centuries (both Christian and non-Christian) that are NOT part of today's New Testament canons. Akers thus attempts to discover what Jesus really lived and died for and finds answers that may be new or even shocking to many. "The Lost Religion of Jesus" is a well-researched, well-written and worthwhile read for anyone with a spiritual or academic interest in Jesus of Nazareth.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting and helpful, April 28, 2005
This review is from: The Lost Religion of Jesus: Simple Living and Nonviolence in Early Christianity (Paperback)
I enjoyed this book. It was a very refreshing look at Jesus, and early Christianity. The early Christians were quite different from the face of Christianity today. How often it is neglected and forgotten that Jesus spoke strongly for non-violence. Was he really a vegetarian? This is hard to prove or disprove. Maybe he eschewed red meat but not fish. Anyway, the vegetarian aspect of the book was interesting. Overall a very good read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fewer vegies, more non-violence please, December 27, 2002
By 
This review is from: The Lost Religion of Jesus: Simple Living and Nonviolence in Early Christianity (Paperback)
This is a well-researched, straightforward history about the beliefs and practices of the earliest Jewish Christians. The book is a quick and thought-provoking read, especially when dealing with the origins of the New Testament gospels and the motivations of competing groups and individuals to edit or rewrite the texts. There is, for my taste, an overemphasis on vegetarianism as one of the differences between the Jewish Christian groups and the Gentile Christian church established by Paul and others (The back cover lists a Vegetarian Sourcebook as this author's other credit), but this is not a book that strains to prove Jesus was a vegetarian. The author speculates often, but is careful to point out where the historical record is thin and clearly labels fact from hypothesis. Worth a look if you want to start learning what they didn't teach you in Sunday school.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A compelling book providing a challenging perspective, January 11, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Lost Religion of Jesus: Simple Living and Nonviolence in Early Christianity (Paperback)
This book shows a more than acceptable level of scholarship from an author outside the field and is a well written easy read. The essential premise is logically, progressively and compellingly advanced if perhaps coming across as something of an oversimplification: I was left with a sense that while wanting to accept the arguments of the book, a comfortable secure western twenty first century perspective might be imposing a lens on actual causes and motivations back in the first.

In drawing attention to a wrong turn taken by the evolving Christian religion away from the actual teachings and nature of Jesus, the author does come across as having his own agenda to push - the avocation of a vegetarian lifestyle. I had a sense of the book being used to justify and advance this from a historical religious perspective, not too surprisingly perhaps given the authors position as displayed by his other work. This feeling appeared to be born out by the authors closing words. I support and endorse his sentiments, but can't help feeling that a little optimistic wishful thinking might have hung over the analysis.

With the rise of right wing religious conservatism and the larger picture of global problems such as climate change, the widening gap between rich and poor etc. I recommend this book for providing easy access to valid alternate perspectives in the secular/religious debate and for raising the suggestion of a historical justification for other paths and personal choices.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Provacative - Very Inspiring, January 5, 2013
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Lost Religion of Jesus: Simple Living and Nonviolence in Early Christianity (Paperback)
Sometimes truth can be difficult. I only knew about jesus from the teachings of my church from a young age and even into my adult years. Mr. Akers makes excellent points drawing his conclusions from many sources. It didn't weaken my faith but inspired me to search for the truth - to want to know more fully about the real Jesus.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars if you want to know the truth, January 9, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Lost Religion of Jesus: Simple Living and Nonviolence in Early Christianity (Paperback)
i would highly recommend this book to anyone wanting to get beyond all the confusion and distortion in "christianity" and get a glimpse of the real faith and real message at the root of yeshua's ministry.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Refreshing!, January 2, 2009
This review is from: The Lost Religion of Jesus: Simple Living and Nonviolence in Early Christianity (Paperback)
Keith Akers argues that Jesus didn't want to start a new religion, but rather a reform movement based in simple living and nonviolence. The reader might not be convinced of his thesis that Jesus was a vegetarian, but Akers presents many bold, refreshing theories about the early Church. Written in excellent prose.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stimulating and respectable despite flaws, March 30, 2008
By 
This review is from: The Lost Religion of Jesus: Simple Living and Nonviolence in Early Christianity (Paperback)
Clearly Akers has his personal biases, but I think his effort is mainly refreshing and helpful. Concerning the Bible, Akers emphasizes that Jesus presented himself as a Jewish reformer, who viewed the Bible critically. For Jesus, real faith required discerning a primary message among the Bible's diverse accounts of wars, visions, laws and traditions. He made selective judgements of what to emphasize or ignore, which made him so highly controversial to the Pharisaical legalists or defenders of scriptural inerrancy in his time.

Akers also claims that Jesus was a vegetarian. I was not convinced either that this was true, or that it was important to the early Jewish Chrisitans. But related to this, Akers points out something which does seem important: Jesus opposition to animal sacrifice. And here, Akers emphasizes a side of the Gospel accounts that might shock many later Christians -- that Jesus was almost violently opposed to making his religion a cult of sacrifice for sin. Like John the Baptist he believed in baptism as a rite of repentance and renewal, but not in sacrifice or killing to buy freedom from guilt.

For his well presented arguments on how Jesus took the Bible, and how he viewed the whole notion of sacrifice, I think Akers' book would be stimulating for any Christian study or discussion group.

--author of Correcting Jesus
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read to an open minded Jesus follower, January 4, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Lost Religion of Jesus: Simple Living and Nonviolence in Early Christianity (Paperback)
The Lost Religion of Jesus was one of the most thought provoking books on historical Jesus I have read. It somehow shifted the paradigm of my understanding of many aspects of Early Christianity.

First, I came to know that the history of Christianity cannot be stripped down from now to the past, but rather one has to learn about the schisms in the early church and the reasons behind them. Here, I was amazed to learn about the dispute between Paul vs James/Peter over vegetarianism.

Second, I fully realized how much the historical events rather than the teaching itself influenced the type of Christianity that survived. The spread of Gentile Christianity can be associated with the destruction of Jerusalem and Bar Kokhba revolt that negatively affected Jewish Christianity.

Finally, I got a great deal of information about the Ebionites as the “true” followers of Jesus. Reading the Gospels, I always felt that they consist of three parts: 1.) the message of Jesus; 2). the message of Paul; 3). theological interpolations. Basically, the first part is what always interested me. It is about simple life, non-violence and vegetarianism and It is in line with many other spiritual traditions. The Paul’s additions as well as those of church fathers’ ones only distorted the message completely. Thus, Akers helped me to learn about real historical practitioners of the Religion of Jesus.

Responding to the other reviewers’ criticism about too much vegetarianism in the book, I can only say that this was an essential part of the Jesus’ message. This is the most important issue to understand about the dispute between James/Peter, who saw vegetarianism as essential and Paul, who in the very same manner thought that this is something not to care about.

To sum up, this is a great book and a must read for every open-minded being who seeks an understanding of a true message of Jesus.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great historical research, November 26, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Lost Religion of Jesus: Simple Living and Nonviolence in Early Christianity (Paperback)
This author found practices, during his research in the papal archives, that made me shudder when I realized how far we've come from the faith once delivered to the saints.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First
ARRAY(0xa6a9d690)

This product

The Lost Religion of Jesus: Simple Living and Nonviolence in Early Christianity
$20.00 $18.58
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.