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The Lost World Hardcover – March 1, 1997

Book 2 of 2 in the Jurassic Park Series

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--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Written in the wake of Jurassic Park's phenomenal box-office success, The Lost World seems as much a guidebook for Hollywood types hard at work on the franchise's followup as it is a legitimate sci-fi thriller. Which begs the inevitable questions: Is the plot a rehash of the first book? Sure it is, with the action unfolding on yet another secluded island, the mysterious "Site B." Is the cast of characters basically the same? Absolutely, from a freshly minted pair of cute, compu-savvy kids right down to the neatly exhumed chaos theorist Ian Malcolm (who was presumed dead at the close of JP). But is it fun to read? You betcha. Hollywood (and Michael Crichton) keeps telling us the same old stories for a very good reason: we like them. And the pulp SF formula Crichton has mastered with Jurassic Park and The Lost World is no exception. --Paul Hughes --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

One fact about this sequel to Jurassic Park stands out above all: it follows a book that, with spinoffs, including the movie, proved to be the most profitable literary venture ever. So where does the author of a near billion-dollar novel sit? Squarely on the shoulders of his own past work?and Arthur Conan Doyle's. Crichton has borrowed from Conan Doyle before?Rising Sun was Holmes and Watson in Japan?but never so brazenly. The title itself here, the same as that of Conan Doyle's yarn about an equatorial plateau rife with dinos, acknowledges the debt. More enervating are Crichton's self-borrowings: the plot line of this novel reads like an outtake from JP. Instead of bringing his dinos to a city, for instance, Crichton keeps them in the Costa Rican jungle, on an offshore island that was the secret breeding ground for the beasts. Only chaos theoretician Ian Malcolm, among the earlier principals, returns to explore this Lost World, six years after the events of JP; but once again, there's a dynamic paleontologist, a pretty female scientist and two cute kids, boy and girl?the latter even saves the day through clever hacking, just as in JP. Despite stiff prose and brittle characters, Chrichton can still conjure unparalleled dino terror, although the wonder is gone and the attacks are predictable, the pacing perfunctory. But his heart now seems to be not so much in the storytelling as in pedagogy: from start to finish, the novel aims to illustrate Crichton's ideas about extinction?basically, that it occurs because of behavioral rather than environmental changes?and reads like a scientific fable, with pages of theory balancing the hectic action. As science writing, it's a lucid, provocative undertaking; but as an adventure and original entertainment, even though it will sell through the roof, it seems that Crichton has laid a big dinosaur egg. 2,000,000 first printing; BOMC and QPB main selection.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 431 pages
  • Publisher: Perfection Learning (March 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0780772997
  • ISBN-13: 978-0780772991
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (883 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,666,816 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Michael Crichton was born in Chicago in 1942. His novels include Next, State of Fear, Prey, Timeline, Jurassic Park, and The Andromeda Strain. He was also the creator of the television series ER. One of the most popular writers in the world, his books have been made into thirteen films, and translated in thirty-six languages. He died in 2008.

Customer Reviews

Any Jurassic Park fans should read the books!
Matt
The good things: great action, awesome excitement, and characters that make up for the loss of plot (sort of).
basilicus@hotmail.com
I have read this book twice and still enjoyed it the second time around.
Erika Soeterik

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Adam Oster on February 24, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Although one could very easily take issue right off the bat with the rather lame excuses Crichton uses to bring his favorite (as well as mine) character back from the dead, moving past that really brings the reader into a world much more special than that of the original novel. Being quite different than the movie, this book delves into exploring the history of the mysterious InGen corporation further, while also giving a great bit more detail into what all occurred that led to the creation of Jurassic Park.

I thoroughly enjoyed being able to learn more about the history behind the first book and, when it finally arrived, the action sequences in this book definitely build a great deal of suspense, although I feel that they no where near the quality and satisfaction of the original book. Crichton not only manages to bring in a few new species of dinosaur, but also manages to post conflicting ideas from the original book on things like how the T-Rex sees things, ensuring that such things comment on the original theory as well.

All in all, this book is definitely worth the read, especially if you enjoyed the first one (book or movie). It's sad to see that the film series departed from Crichton's vision so early in the process, I would have loved to see something much more in line with this book than the reality of The Lost World.
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46 of 64 people found the following review helpful By M on January 4, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Professor George E. Challenger, noted scientist, says dinosaurs are still alive, and he knows where to find them. The scientific community says he's a madman or a fraud, or both. Challenger's only evidence is a bunch of blurry photographs. Fellow scientists say the photos are obviously doctored and the newspapers call it a fantasy. Boiling with rage, Challenger goes into seclusion. Anyone foolish enough to bring up the tender subject around him is liable to end up in the gutter outside his house, with a few extra lumps for the gutter press.
The only reporter brave, or stupid, enough to face the professor's wrath and get the story is Edward Malone, young, intrepid journalist for the Daily Gazette. At a boisterous scientific meeting, Professor Summerlee, a rival scientist, calls Challenger's bluff. Summerlee will return to South America and prove Challenger wrong. The young journalist volunteers to go along. Lord John Roxton, the famous hunter, can't miss an opportunity to return to the jungle and adds his name to expedition. Professor Challenger is happy they are taking him seriously, even if they don't all believe him. But what will they find in South America? A strange, living time capsule from the Jurassic period filled with pterodactyls and stegosaurs? Or will they only find vast tracks of endless jungles and Challenger's daydreams? Either way there will be danger and adventure for all.
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote "The Lost World" in 1912 for the Strand magazine, the same magazine that published his Sherlock Holmes stories. It's a great Edwardian science-fiction adventure, although some may not like the British Imperialism and Darwinian racism. Still, in "The Lost World" Conan Doyle lets his hair down a little.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on July 26, 2001
Format: Paperback
I've read some of Doyle's work, but after reading this story I was stunned. In this timeless tale a Zoologist (Proffesor George E. Challenger)leads an expedidition into Amazon trying to find a land inhabited by dinosaurs. With him he brings a young journilist (Edward Malone), an adventurer (Lord John Roxton), and another proffesor (Proffesor Summerlee). With their bearers and guids they set fourth towrds their destination... THE LOST WORLD. Only as they meet their destination something goes wrong leaving them stranded in The Lost World for what seems to be forever... Therefore, I rate it a five for it's thrills and chills. Your, Reviewer for the George E. Challenger books, Austin T. Van Tassel
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mary Whipple HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on April 14, 2009
Format: Paperback
(4.5 stars) Fans of the Sherlock Holmes series may be as surprised as I was by the complete change of style that this novel represents for its author. Gone are the formulas, the formal language, the stilted dialogue, and the gamesmanship between author and reader that characterize the Holmes novels, however delightful and successful those may be as mysteries. Instead, we see Doyle letting his imagination run free in a sci-fi romp that is both fun and funny, and often thoughtful. Written in 1912, during an eight-year hiatus from his Sherlock Holmes novels, and six years after his last "historical novel," The Lost World is the first of five works involving temperamental Professor Edward Challenger, a scientist investigating evolution and related subjects.

Challenger is a scientific outcast, vilified for his most recent paper, in which he claimed to have seen dinosaurs and pre-historic creatures in a remote area of South America, but which he refuses to locate on a map. Blaming the press for much of the controversy over his research, he despises reporters, and regularly assaults them. Young Ed Malone, a reporter looking for more excitement than he is getting on his regular beat, manages to make a connection with Challenger, after passing a test of his mettle.

Along with two other scientists, Elizabeth Summerlee and Lord John Roxton, they travel with Challenger to the mysterious plateau in Brazil where he claims to have seen extraordinary beasts believed dead for millions of years. Malone's newspaper, which partially funded the expedition, expects him to send daily reports of his adventures by messenger back to "civilization. These form much of the novel's narrative.
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