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The Lottie Project Paperback – February 13, 2001


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 3 - 7
  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Yearling (February 13, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0440416175
  • ISBN-13: 978-0440416173
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,778,394 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Wilson (Double Act) here introduces an animated heroine who delivers droll observations in a self-assured voice with a decidedly British accent. "I love fooling around, doing crazy things and being a bit sassy and making everyone laugh," announces Charlie (short for Charlotte). Her engaging prattle chronicles events at school--where she tangles with her teacher, bickers with her best friends and works on a project about Victorian life--as well as happenings at home. Charlie's newly unemployed single mother takes on three part-time positions, the most notable being a job as caregiver for a youngster who lives with his father. Much to the girl's chagrin, her mother takes a fancy to her employer. Their evolving relationship provides the backdrop for the novel's most dramatic and poignant scenes, in which Wilson reveals her ability to elicit tears as well as laughter. Between chapters, readers find reproduced "pages" from Charlie's school report--journal-like entries written by a poor Victorian girl who leaves home to help support her family. Wilson creatively reshapes Charlie's own experiences to depict the plight of a girl living 100 years earlier, thus adding new dimension to Charlie's perceptions while offering intriguing period particulars. Sharratt's lively, doodled spot drawings further reinforce the protagonist's view of life, both present and past. To borrow a phrase from Charlie, it would be "easy peasy, simple pimple" to welcome her back. Ages 8-12. (Oct.)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Grade 4-6-Charlotte (Charlie) Enright thinks her first day of school will be "Easy-peasy, simple-pimple"-until she meets her new teacher. Miss Beckworth is a no-nonsense type, whereas outspoken Charlie likes to play the class clown. To make matters worse, Miss Beckworth assigns seats alphabetically and Charlie ends up sitting next to Jamie Edwards, the perennial teachers' pet. This year, the class is focusing on the Victorian period; each student is required to do a special project on the era. When Charlie spots a photograph of a nurserymaid about her age, she names her Lottie and writes a diary from the servant's point of view. Lottie's fictional diary entries alternate with Charlie's own story, with the former adding historical detail, and both narratives reflecting the changes in the girl's life. And things are changing for Charlie: her single mother loses her job and becomes romantically involved with the father of the child she now baby-sits, her best friends are suddenly boy crazy, and she finds out that Jamie isn't all that bad after all. Wilson has written a funny, thoughtful novel with a well-developed main character. Charlie's emotions and reactions are true to life-frustration, jealousy, and uncertainty about the future. By turns poignant and humorous, this book is a winner. Sharratt's entertaining pen-and-ink illustrations are scattered throughout, highlighting details from the text.
Terrie Dorio, Santa Monica Public Library, CA
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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See all 22 customer reviews
I have read and got every single one of Jacqueline's books that she has written so far, even the diaries!
A 12-year old reader
This girl is so charming in her very own way and very much an example for adults to be truthful about yourselves and to express your feeling freely without hypocrasy.
azr
Her teacher is mean, makes her sit next to Jamie Edwards,and assigns a "dreary" projecton the "dreary" victorian period.
tara star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on March 9, 2002
Format: Paperback
Once you start reading 'The Lottie Project', you just can't stop. I bought it just yesterday from a book store and I already finished reading it. All the characters are very well-portrayed and the illustrations are amusing. Charlie is an average eleven-year-old with lot's of problems. She doesn't like her new teacher who insists on calling her by her full name, Charlotte. She is made to sit with James Edward, the snobby, goody-two-shoes rich boy. She also has to do a project on the Victorians, whom she hardly knows anything about. But Charlie gets a lovely idea to make a diary for Lottie, a young girl who is sent to work as a nurserymaid in the Victorians' time. She gets quite absorbed in the project and finds that her real life isn't much different from fictional Lottie's. First, her mom loses her good job as a manager and has to do oddjobs like cleaning people's houses and baby-sitting. But worse than that, could Charlie's mom possibly have a boyfriend? All-in-all, an amazing story very well portrayed by a master story-teller. Well worth the money!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on March 9, 2002
Format: Paperback
Once you start reading 'The Lottie Project', you just can't stop. I bought it just yesterday from a book store and I already finished reading it. All the characters are very well-portrayed and the illustrations are amusing. Charlie is an average eleven-year-old with lot's of problems. She doesn't like her new teacher who insists on calling her by her full name, Charlotte. She is made to sit with James Edward, the snobby, goody-two-shoes rich boy. She also has to do a project on the Victorians, whom she hardly knows anything about. But Charlie gets a lovely idea to make a diary for Lottie, a young girl who is sent to work as a nurserymaid in the Victorians' time. She gets quite absorbed in the project and finds that her real life isn't much different from fictional Lottie's. First, her mom loses her good job as a manager and has to do oddjobs like cleaning people's houses and baby-sitting. But worse than that, could Charlie's mom possibly have a boyfriend? All-in-all, an amazing story very well portrayed by a master story-teller. Well worth the money!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on February 6, 2002
Format: Paperback
Charlotte Alice Katherine Enright (better known as Charlie) is getting to a point where life has several problems. First of all, she has no father (well, sort of. He left her and her mother when Charlie was very young), so Charlie and her mom aren't exactly the richest people, and live in a small apartment, with one bedroom, a bathroom,and a kitchen. Plus, her single, young mother, Joanne Enright (better known as Jo) has recently started dressing up and wearing makeup for no reason what so ever. And if that wasn't enough, she has even worse problems at school.

Charlie is starting a new year at school, and she thinks that it is going to be a great year, but she is very wrong.This year, she meets the devil: a new, extremely strict teacher named Ms.Beckworth, who ruined everything for Charlie. For example, Charlie was planning on sitting with her best friends Lisa and Angela, but instead, Ms. Beckworth put Lisa and Angela together, and put Charlie with the most irritating, snobby,smarty-pants kid in the whole class: Jamie Edwards. Plus, Ms. Beckworth assigned the class a boring Victorian project, but Charlie decided to give the project a little twist, and that's when the diary of Lottie, the Victorian nursery maid,was born. Will Charlie ever survive this year?

The cute, funny book, The Lottie Project, by Jacqueline Wilson, is an enjoyable, must-read book. I am not alone when I say, "I loved it!". This one-of-a-kind book could never relate to any other books. This book was cutely humorous, and was hard to put down. I really enjoyed the fact that Jacqueline Wilson compared a main character (Charlie) with history (Lottie). If you enjoy books that are just plainly sad, mysterious, or historical, then maybe this isn't‚ your match. But, if you are a person who enjoys a cheery story with a tint of sadness, a speckle of mystery, and a tad bit of history, then this is definitely the book for you!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 24, 1999
Format: Audio Cassette
I think that this book is very funny but also deals with a serious matter, growing up. The book is definately a good buy because you can read it over and over again. It is also not to difficcult to read so it is good if you want to relax and read. I think the age range of people who would enjoy this book is probably around 10-14.
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A Kid's Review on March 3, 2006
Format: Paperback
Lottie's real name is Charlotte, but noone calls her that..... until this 'horrible' new teacher Mrs Beckworth arrives, and doesn't let her sit next to Lisa (who Lottie has saved the best place for), but makes poor Lottie sit next to that swot Jamie. Lottie hates Mrs Beckworth, and sends around humorous poems about trains and teases about Jamie. Lottie's teenage mum, Jo, is having problems with work but suddenly Mrs Beckworth gives the class a project. it is about the victorians and Lottie writes a diary about it. she buys Jamie, who comes her friend in the end, some postcards and everything but then Jo gets a nerdy man called Mark as a boyfriend because she babysits his son, Robin, who is small and shy and has a little stuffed robin toy that his mum made for him before she died. lottie lets him use her felt pens but he just draws a house and his mum and dad and himself. when Jo and Mark go on a love ride on a picnic where Robin is sick, Lottie sees them kissing and bullies poor robin until he runs away from home and then there is a search party because everyone is worried and he gets found and put in hospital and lottie makes him a cake and draws him pictures of birds. lottie suddenly feels bad and crys in her bathroom because she doesn't feel old and hates herself. she even needs the comfort of her old barbies, which are packed away in her drawer and she and jo used to dress them and drive them to posh parties to make them dance, and jo enjoyed this more than lottie!Read more ›
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