Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.99
  • Save: $1.82 (12%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Lucky Ones has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Pastimebooks
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Gently used may contain ex-library markings, may have some light highlighting and or textual notes
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Lucky Ones Paperback – October 4, 2005


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.17
$4.95 $0.01
Audio, Cassette
"Please retry"

The Water Knife by Paolo Bacigalupi
The Water Knife by Paolo Bacigalupi
Enjoy this cautionary tale classic, depicting an America newly shaped by scarcity of our most vital resource. Learn more | See related books
$13.17 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Lucky Ones + The Country Life: A Novel + Saving Agnes: A Novel
Price for all three: $39.04

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Billed as a novel of "overlapping relationships," Whitbread-winner Cusk's evocative latest, with its tenuously connected sections, feels more like a short story collection linked by theme and a few shared characters. Cusk (The Country Life; Saving Agnes) unites her tales via her characters' lonely, isolated conditions and the knotty relationships between parents and children—from Kristy, an imprisoned mother-to-be who gives birth in the back of a squad car in "Confinement," to Mrs. Daley, an unhappy, controlling woman whose need to establish herself as a victim trumps her ability to find or give happiness in "Mrs Daley's Daughter." Cusk's vision of contemporary relationships is a lonely, wintry one, in which people's inner landscapes dominate. This makes for gorgeous, languorous writing in places, but it also restricts the view: the landscapes are so rich with pathos that there isn't always enough room for the range of human emotion so essential to prose that relies on thought instead of action. In "The Sacrifices," a married woman who never had the baby she desired visits her childhood home, now occupied by strangers, and fantasizes about returning to her old room: "I would sit on my bed as the afternoon turned outside the window to night. I would wait for them to call me down." This passivity runs throughout the book, as characters tend toward rumination rather than deed. But as readers come to the end, the lives of Cusk's characters begin to tie together hauntingly. This is not life in all its messy complexity, but a mannered, poignant portrait of the treacheries of domestic life.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From The New Yorker

The women in these five linked vignettes are all connected to a journalist named Serena Porter, either personally or as readers of the weekly column she writes about her family life. While they struggle to understand their painful and awkward responses to lovers and children, she spins the raw material of motherhood and marriage into witty and topical dispatches. Of course, much of what Serena writes is factitious, both in its details (she freely appropriates an acquaintance's experience as her own) and in the breezy complacency that it projects; Cusk seems to suggest that our true thoughts about love and family defy articulation. Such is her gift for capturing women's psychology and their sense of their place in the world that the novel achieves what Serena's column cannot: a fresh and compassionate portrait of a generation's feelings about motherhood.
Copyright © 2005 The New Yorker --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (October 4, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007161328
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007161324
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.5 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #890,799 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Elizabeth Hendry VINE VOICE on March 26, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Rachel Cusk's The Lucky Ones is an excellent collection of interconnected stories. It's not a novel in the traditional sense of the word, really a group of well-written stories with characters in each story popping up in the others. All of the stories focus on the relationship between parents and children, exploring the nature of the desire for becoming a parent--is it something innate, something we all have? Are some better parents than others, or are they all bad in their own way? The writing here is wonderful--very enjoyable. A well-done collection that hangs together much more cohesively than most other interconnected story collections I have read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Nancy E. Patton on March 22, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I have read every one of Rachel Cusk's novels and they just get better. While I am carried along by her stories, I am also marveling at her command of language, how just one sentence can reveal a whole life. She understands how men feel, as sensitively and acutely as she reveals a woman's heart. I read probably two or three books a week (usually in the wee small hours) and this would have to be the pick of the last six months' reading -- and that's saying something! This is a novel lover's novel - fiction that feels utterly real.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 23, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Cusk's The Country Life is one of my favorite novels of the last ten years. The characters are hysterical and tragic at the same time; her use of metaphor constantly amazed me with its subtle power; although not much actually happens in the plot, the chaotic internal life of the main character creates a vivacious momentum that carries you quickly through the novel.
I was thrilled when I saw that Cusk had a new book (I have not read her recent book about motherhood). But the energy of The Country Life was not here. Her characterizations in The Lucky Ones are insightful--her knack for exploring unusual relationships gives many of the stories their driving force--however, I just couldn't care about them. I blame the short story format. The characters are connected--loosely--but not enough to sustain the cessation of story after story. As soon as we start to wonder about the incarcerated woman, her story is over. What happens to Jane? To Lucy? To Martin & Dominique? The last two stories do an admirable job of bringing together the themes set forth on the book jacket, "haunted by family, longing for love, the struggle to connect," but I was left feel like I could shelve the book and never think about it again.
I highly recommend The Country Life if this is your first venture at Cusk. As for The Lucky Ones, it is not the best example of her abilities.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Luan Gaines HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 25, 2004
Format: Hardcover
The author of The Lucky Ones tackles relationships, particularly between parents and children in this series of interconnected stories sharing common characters. With incisive prose, Cusk addresses the lost opportunities that plague everyday life. Each new tale builds upon the prior one, adding characters and events, until she exposes the fragile fabric of their lives.
The first story sets the stage for the ongoing drama as a young woman grapples with the impending birth of her child, how the delivery will destroy the intimacy she has treasured throughout the pregnancy. Carrying a child has allowed her to pretend an emotional distance from undesirable surroundings. With the birth, she will be thrust into reality.
In another tale, we meet the acerbic Mrs. Daley, a woman engaged in an adversarial relationship with one of her children, Josephine. Mrs. Daley is offended daily by Josephine's choices, her unmarried state, current pregnancy and her paucity of worldly goods. Mrs. Daley is incensed by Josephine's lack of engagement in the one-sided battle for dominance. Lacking a sense of the fragility of others, Mrs. Daley builds her days around such small dramas, a petulant woman terrified of confronting her own shortcomings.
In yet another small drama, a group of friends go on a skiing vacation, forced to endure accommodations that are clearly unsuitable. Thrown together randomly, they muddle through the holiday barely connecting, ruminating privately over their personal accomplishments and disappointments, the drastic changes wrought by marriage and parenthood. They are virtual strangers, sleeping under the same roof by night, flashing down the icy slopes by day.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Fitzgerald Fan VINE VOICE on November 14, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This collection of short stories is not exactly positive, despite what the title might suggest. Through five interconnected short stories, Cusk relates to her readers the darker side of humanity concerning children and marriage.

It really seems to be about people who desire spouses and children as a way to fix themselves, to fill a void. Mistakes are always realized too late when there is no hope of turning back. Of course, this always ends in catastrophe and the impact seems to grow exponentially down the line.

If you are looking for the feel-good-hit-of-the-year, this is not it. But, as usual, the language is gorgeous and the ideas are realistic. Many people are just lost, desperate, and all-around f**ked up....this book is about those people.

I've said it before and I will say it again, Cusk is brilliant and this is another shining example of her depth and ability to relate everyday tragedy. Highly recommended.

If you are looking for something a bit on the lighter side, "The Country Life" (also by Cusk) is terrific as well, and very funny.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
The Lucky Ones
This item: The Lucky Ones
Price: $13.17
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?