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The Lure: The True Story of How the Department of Justice Brought Down Two of The World's Most Dangerous Cyber Criminals Paperback – February 14, 2011

ISBN-13: 978-1435457126 ISBN-10: 1435457129 Edition: 1st
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Editorial Reviews

Review

Introduction. 1. Speakeasy. 2. The Investigation Begins. 3. The Lure. 4. The Sting. 5. In Custody. 6. PayPal and eBay. 7. A (not so) Brief Primer on National Security Investigations. 8. eBay. 9. Victim Banks. 10. CTS (San Diego). 11. Verio and webcom.com. 13. The Motion to Suppress and Preliminary Skirmishing. 14. Preparing for Trial. 15. The Trial. 16. Aftermath.

About the Author

Steve Schroeder was a trial attorney and an Assistant States Attorney for the Department of Justice from 1974 until his retirement in July 2002. He specialized in white-collar crime and corruption prosecutions until 1992, when he prosecuted his first computer crime case, an intrusion into the Federal Court House network. From that point on, he became immersed in the growing field of computer crime cases. He became a charter member of the Department of Justice Computer and Telecommunications Coordinator program at its inception in 1995. He was a member of the national working group that advises the Attorney General on computer crime issues, and is a frequent lecturer on computer crime and electronic evidence. He is currently an Adjunct Professor at Seattle University School of Law, where he teaches Computer Crime.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Cengage Learning PTR; 1 edition (February 14, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1435457129
  • ISBN-13: 978-1435457126
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #712,351 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Stephen C. Schroeder is a graduate of the University of Washington and the University of San Diego School of Law. He was a trial attorney and an Assistant United States Attorney for the United States Department of Justice from 1974 until his retirement in July 2002. He prosecuted computer crime since 1992, and was a member of the Department of Justice Computer and Telecommunications Coordinator program since its inception in 1995. He was a member of the national working group that advises the Attorney General on computer crime issues, and is a frequent lecturer on computer crime and electronic evidence. He is currently an Adjunct Professor at Seattle University School of Law, where he teaches Computer Crime and Privacy. He has also taught computer forensics in the Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering at Seattle University, and is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Washington, where he teaches a class on Computer Forensics and the Law.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Mayo VINE VOICE on May 24, 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
In The Lure: The True Story of How the Department of Justice Brought Down Two of The World's Most Dangerous Cyber Criminals, Steve Schroeder provides a clearly written, blow by blow account of how the FBI took down a Russian hacking operation.

Schroeder begins the book by telling how he and his colleagues lured two Russian hackers into leaving their virtual immunity in Russia for the far less tolerant shores of the US. Of course, the case involved highly technical details, but the author breaks it down for readers in a way that is understandable to anyone with rudimentary computer or programming experience. This aspect of his writing is impressive, and for this reason I think the book would make fine reading for anyone interested in cyber crime, or as an introductory level text in a classroom setting.

The "lure" ends pretty early, though, because they catch the hackers, and the rest of the book is a detailed foray into the US legal process. I found it enjoyable in places, but I don't know how well 400+ pages of legal minutiae will appeal to others. The evidence is overwhelming against the hackers, and even though Schroeder attempts to inject drama into the various stages of the prosecution process, it reads more like a drawn-out tale of sad desperation. Law enforcement officials, experts, and the prosecution labor mightily to bring these two to justice, and by the end you get the feeling that unless hackers are insanely incompetent, they can get away with whatever they want in the US. The narrative rarely lags, but by the end I found myself losing interest in the bureaucratic maneuverings of "Steve" (the author writes in the third person) and his colleagues.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Slokes VINE VOICE on April 18, 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Steve Schroeder's love for the tiniest detail helped make him an effective prosecutor in the emerging field of cybercrime at the dawn of the 21st century. But it also makes him a rather stodgy writer, and even less effective editor. This book makes you feel you are sitting on a very long trial in real time.

"The Lure" examines how two young Russian hackers were brought to justice by a system still working through an enormous learning curve. How to prove that their breaking into web servers of banks, online merchants, and other businesses boiled down to extortion and fraud? How to prove malicious intent using terms like "hash," "bash," and "tarred"? It's this challenge Schroeder attempts to explicate in this new book.

For me, the most interesting part of the book was the trap set by the FBI, the "lure" of the title that drew the two Russians to Seattle to demonstrate the art of hacking to the very people who planned to arrest them. For Schroeder, that's the preliminary part of the story, the part that didn't involve him, and over with in 70 of the book's 500 pages. After that, it's on to the pre-trial and trial phases of the case, and a deep-dish examination awash in the intricacies of law and computer science.

Schroeder's writing style, as indicated, is very cut-and-dry, and more than a bit self-serving. He did a great job leading the prosecution of the case, and wants you to know this by highlighting his clever decisions and choicer comments. This subjective viewpoint would be less grating if he didn't take the distancing tack of referring to himself in the third-person.

The court case is the least interesting part of the story.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Joanne M. Friedman on July 22, 2011
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I didn't check the author's bio before I read the introduction to The Lure, and my first reaction was that it sounded like it was written by a lawyer. Surprise! It was.

This is a fascinating story of the inner workings of the Justice Department with all the detail a reader could possibly want. This cyber crime--the hacking of computer networks at several financial institutions and US corporate offices by a pair of Russians--received a lot of press at the time it occurred, but the specifics were, of course, kept quiet until the case was finalized in the courts. It is enlightening to learn how our system works behind the scenes to bring down criminals. Turns out it's more like TV crime dramas than we might think! The Lure is a moment-by-moment factual account of the entire process from the moment the hackers were discovered through the sting operation (the "Lure" of the title) to the grand finale.

For many readers, however, it is likely to be overwhelming in that it is so very detailed and written in a style reminiscent of a legal brief. Thi shouldn't be a surprise coming from publisher Course Technology, and I'm sure upon its release this text will become a staple in law school cyber-crime classes and police academies around the world. It is not an easy or light read. Not knowing what to expect, I started reading in the living room with the TV news playing in the background and my usual accompaniment of cage birds chattering and a cat crawling onto my lap for petting. Within a few pages I hied myself to the silence of the bedroom where I could focus full attention and reread the part I'd already read. That's how information- and word-dense the book is.

Since I'm a techno-dweeb, the cyber jargon was relatively familiar.
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