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The Lurker in the Lobby: The Guide to Lovecraftian Cinema Paperback – February 1, 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Night Shade Books; First Edition edition (February 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1892389355
  • ISBN-13: 978-1892389350
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,087,394 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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This is a good guide to Lovecraftian films.
D. P. Cobb
The writing in these sections is a mixture of plot summary, production information, and opinion.
Jory
On the whole, this is a good book, with plenty of photographs and illustrations.
Brian P. Akers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Brian P. Akers on February 1, 2007
Format: Paperback
This is a light, crispy diversion for fans of Lovecraft and genre cinema, that asks the compelling question: "What in the name of Yog-Sothoth is a 'real' Lovecraft film adaptation?" It is sprinkled with droll witticisms that lovers of Lovecraft will relish. For example, of the silly-sounding eldritch lines spoken by Dean Stockwell's Wilber Whateley, in "The Dunwich Horror" (1970, which faithfully try but painfully fail to bring Lovecraft's written word to soundtrack life, the authors astutely observe: "Lovecraftian incantations like ygnaiih or thflthkh'ngha ... look more blasphemous than they sound." Or, their general reference to film versions of Lovecraft works as "these flickering blasphemies." The appreciation and love of HPL's works, and the intentions (if not always the results) of cinematists who have tried to honor them in film, come through in the pages of this book, endearing the attentive reader. The authors profess this is not a comprehensive work, so I cannot fault them for anything left out. Still, if not presumptuous, I would lobby (ahem) for inclusion of a film that deserves consideration in a work such as this, in a presumptive future, enlarged edition: "The Kindred" with Kim Hunter, Rod Steiger, and a starring cast of younger, lesser-known actors. It is chockful of Lovecraftian themes, moreso than many a work explicitly claiming Lovecraft as the source. On the whole, this is a good book, with plenty of photographs and illustrations. But alas, it is over too quickly, leaving one wanting more, but mainly as a tribute to its enjoyable style and concept.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jory on January 11, 2012
Format: Paperback
In the introduction to Lurker in the Lobby, Andrew Migliore and John Strysik claim that their book "is not ... the definitive mythos film guide." This is one of the few statements in the book that I disagree with. Anyone looking for a better or more comprehensive catalogue of the film and television projects based on the cosmic horror fiction of H. P. Lovecraft will be searching in vain.

Instead of limiting themselves to the adaptations that are officially based on Lovecraft's writing, the authors chose to also cover films that are in some significant way inspired by his fiction but not officially based on it. This results in a book in which Re-Animator, The Call of Cthulhu, The Haunted Palace, The Dunwich Horror, Necronomicon, From Beyond, and Die Monster Die are presented along with Alien, The Thing, In the Mouth of Madness, Hellboy, Quatermass and the Pit, Lifeforce, and The Fog.

This was a wise decision for two reasons: first, it shows the wide range of influence that Lovecraft has had on filmmakers, and second, some of the unofficial adaptations have captured his themes and ideas better than some of the official ones. I don't think many people will argue when I say that In the Mouth of Madness and The Thing capture the essence of Lovecraft's writing better than, say, Dagon or The Dunwich Horror.

The book may not be completely comprehensive, but it's certainly very thorough, taking the time to cover such obscurities as episodes of The Real Ghostbusters and Digimon in addition to the more well-known adaptations. Each entry gets anywhere from two to five pages and has at least one black and white photo. The writing in these sections is a mixture of plot summary, production information, and opinion.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mark Alfred on July 12, 2010
Format: Paperback
The only thing keeping this book from greatness is the horrible (lack of) proofreading. That Swedish country is called "Sweeden" for instance. Perhaps the most cringe-inducing is on page 332, where we read "a theif is wounded .... but runs into the isolated home of a Viet-nam vetrtan instead."

Another helpful thing would have been the labeling of some of the photos, especially in the "Short Films" section, so that we would know where the photos came from.

This is a fun book that could only be improved by a little spell-checking.
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