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The Lurking Fear and Other Stories Mass Market Paperback – January 12, 1982


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 182 pages
  • Publisher: Ballantine Del Rey (January 12, 1982)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 034530229X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345302298
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.1 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,581,497 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

Twelve soul-chilling stories by the master of horror will leave you shivering in your boots and afraid to go out in the night. Only H.P. Lovecraft can send your heart racing faster than it's ever gone before. And here are the stories to prove it. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

It was with this story that Lovecraft introduced the Necronomicon.
Wilum Hopfrog Pugmire, Esq.
H.P. Lovecraft was criticized for a wordy adjectival writing style which his proponents, including myself, admired for setting 'atmosphere' to his storytelling.
Brian A. Glennon
Lovecraft is one of the best horror writers ever and this is one of his best collection of stories.
Sean Davis

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Brian A. Glennon on October 14, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Despite reading 'The Mountains of Madness'; 'The Tomb'; and particularly 'Pickman's Model' in a brightly lit, populated main hall of the Boston Public Library in mid-day, I was still creeped out of my skin by the writing skill of this author - thus I became an H.P. Lovecraft advocate! But I wanted more. I wanted the full H.P. Lovecraft experience!
I decided to read 'THE LURKING FEAR And Other Stories' (c.1939, 1985) by Howard Phillips Lovecraft, overnight in the small graveyard on K & E. 5th streets, adjacent to the grade school I attended as a kid. So with book under arm, I left my local watering hole at last call and walked down a dark street, took a left, and stood in front of the small 1840s graveyard "where deformed trees tossed insane branches as their roots displaced unhallowed slabs and sucked venom from what lay below". Yup, this will do nicely.
So I hopped the low black wrought-iron spiked fence, sat down near a street light, coupled with a bright beacon October moon which casted "charonian shadows athwart the low mounds that dotted and streaked the region". I sat on a grave and leaned against a chipped and cracked slate headstone, and in this very un-library like atmosphere, began to read THE LURKING FEAR.
I sat comfortably "where the thick weeds grew and cast queer shadows in the light" and suddenly saw a rat run across a nearby grave. Uh, no problem, since rats are as common as seagulls in Boston; I finished part-one of THE LURKING FEAR in dark and shadow, when I suddenly jolted an inch off the grave recoiling my hand like lightning "for it was out of a phantasmal chaos that my mind leaped when the night grew hideous with shrieks beyond anything in my former experience or imagination.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 3, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
And this collection of short stories contains some real gems. It's important to realize that it can be awfully hard to read more than a couple Lovecraft stories together in a row because it can feel really overly portentious as a collection-- indescribable horror and beauty on every page. However, taken separately, these stories are all first class reads.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Jolley HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 19, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
It seems unfortunate to me that this collection's title comes from "The Lurking Fear," a story which I rank very low among Lovecraft's efforts. "Dagon" and "The Temple" are interesting and bear a connection with Cthulhu and his abode beneath the sea. "Arthur Jermyn" reflects Lovecraft's interest in genealogy, history, as well as issues of miscegenation, inbreeding, and hereditary degeneration over time. Several stories can be classified among the dream image motif Lovecraft developed early on in his mature fiction, while "The Outsider" is quite allegorical and fairly easy to figure out in advance of the ending. Two of the best selections to be found here are "The Hound" and "The Unnameable," two ghost stories of a sort. While "The Hound" is less than original, Lovecraft excels in describing the depravity of the minds of the two main characters and in creating a gruesome, well-defined inner sanctum of evil. "The Unnameable" is akin to a campfire ghost tale, but the somewhat trivial conclusion robs it of some effectiveness.
It is rather odd to find "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" in this collection. All of the other stories were written in or before 1927, while "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" bears a birth date of 1931; at this point in his career, Lovecraft was in his prime, and the effective honing of his writing within the intervening four years is quite apparent. This story works on all levels. A young traveler stops off in a strange city shunned by the outside community, discovers an incredibly disturbing town history, and eventually faces a frightful attack by terrifyingly fish-like beings. The atmosphere of Innsmouth is incredibly rich and detailed--you can almost smell the terrible fish odor yourself--and the protagonist's escape attempt is wonderfully suspenseful.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michael Valdivielso on June 5, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
...seem to be the focus of many of the stories within this book. The short stories are: The Lurking Fear, Dagon (ocean related story), The White Ship (the oceans within our mind?), Arthur Jermyn, From Beyond, The Temple (ocean related story), The Moon-Bog, The Hound, The Unnamable, The Outsider (an almost SAD story) and The Shadow Over Innsmouth (a must for any fan of Lovecraft).
Dagon and The Shadow Over Innsmouth are linked together by the character of Dagon, an elder deep one. The Temple was a new story (to me) and a very interesting one about a German sub that finds...well, I won't tell you, but you can guess.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 17, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I must say that The Lurking Fear has to be the most entertaining collection of Lovecraft's short stories I've come across yet. He had such a gift. The gift to open up people's minds to new things, strange things, things you don't want to imagine. From The Unnamable to From Beyond to The White Ship, each story exposes the universe of intrigue and mysticism Lovecraft created. Although the characters are only there to represent the ideas Lovecraft exposes, it is still a wonderful read and I suggest it to any open minds or people who just like mind twisters like these.
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More About the Author

H. P. Lovecraft was born in 1890 in Providence, Rhode Island, where he lived most of his life. He wrote many essays and poems early in his career, but gradually focused on the writing of horror stories, after the advent in 1923 of the pulp magazine Weird Tales, to which he contributed most of his fiction. His relatively small corpus of fiction--three short novels and about sixty short stories--has nevertheless exercised a wide influence on subsequent work in the field, and he is regarded as the leading twentieth-century American author of supernatural fiction. H. P. Lovecraft died in Providence in 1937.

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