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The M-Factor: How the Millennial Generation Is Rocking the Workplace Hardcover – April 6, 2010


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The M-Factor: How the Millennial Generation Is Rocking the Workplace + When Generations Collide: Who They Are. Why They Clash. How to Solve the Generational Puzzle at Work + Generations at Work: Managing the Clash of Boomers, Gen Xers, and Gen Yers in the Workplace
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: HarperBusiness (April 6, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061769312
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061769313
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.4 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #228,119 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Lancaster and Stillman, consultants and coauthors of When Generations Collide, give a David Attenborough–worthy documentation of the lifestyle and habits of the Millennial Nation, the generation born between 1982 and 2000. Marked by attentive, helicopter parents, schools that propagate high self-esteem, and an ingrained comfort with/dependency on technology, the Millennials are tarred as flighty, entitled, self-involved dilettantes, but Lancaster and Stillman encourage managers not to judge but to coach and tap into such Millennial talents as speed, social networking, and collaboration. Lively stories illustrate the generation gap and general communication failures between Traditionalists, Boomers, Generation X-ers, and Millennials. The authors do an earnest job in encouraging the generations to attempt to understand each other. Their thorough analysis of how various generations can complement each other makes a strong case for the value of younger people in the workplace—though anyone over the age of 25 will be horrified by the tales of young workers' parents agitating for their offsprings' promotions—with said offsprings' full blessing. (Apr.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

“Lively stories illustrate the generation gap and general communication failures between ‘Traditionalists,’ ‘Boomers,’ ‘Generation X-ers,’ and ‘Millennials....’ [The authors’] thorough analysis of how various generations can complement each other makes a strong case for the value of younger people in the workplace.” (Publishers Weekly)

“A helpful guide to assimilating the Millennial generation into the workplace…they present a compelling case for multigenerational acceptance and provide information for allowing understanding all around.” (Sacramento Book Review)

“David Stillman and Lynne Lancaster have written a masterful book on ways to bridge the disconnect between the older generations and the brilliant operatives who have moved into the workplace. It’s a great guidebook to the current economic situation and provides smart, real-life solutions.” (—Helen Thomas, White House correspondent, Hearst Newspapers)

“Young people ARE transforming the workforce and overall it’s for the better, as their culture is the new culture of work. Read this thoroughly enjoyable and well-researched book to understand how to make it happen for your organization.” (—Don Tapscott, author of Growing Up Digital and Grown Up Digital)

“If you lead and work with Millennials—and very soon that will be all of us—you must take the time to absorb and enjoy The M-Factor.” (—Jim Kouzes, Dean's Executive Professor of Leadership, Leavey School of Business, Santa Clara University, and coauthor of the best-seller, The Leadership Challenge.)

“A witty and insightful read that shatters the simplistic and degrading label of the ‘entitled generation’ and offers a new lens that shows the positive attributes of this next generation.” (—Alyson Schafer, parenting expert and author of Honey, I Wrecked the Kids)

“Understanding the Millennials is no longer an option; it’s a business necessity. Whether you hire and manage Millennials or are a Millennial yourself, The M-Factor will shed much-needed light on the workplace’s most promising-and misunderstood-generation.” (—Richard Davis, chairman, president, and chief executive officer of U.S. Bancorp)

“Lancaster and Stillman have a laser-eye on the future of talent. Don’t just pick up this book and read it! Pick it up, study it, identify your generational blind spots, laugh out loud, and put these no-fail concepts to work.” (—Harvey Mackay, author of the New York Times #1 bestseller Swim With The Sharks Without Being Eaten Alive)

“Millennials are a rapidly growing part of the nation’s workforce and one day soon will be leading our businesses and nonprofits. This readable, informative, thought-provoking book sets the stage for understanding and working well with these new colleagues. Put The M-Factor on your reading list.” (—David J. Skorton, president, Cornell University)

The M-Factor teaches readers the most important lesson they’ll need for the workplace of tomorrow: how to turn the Millennials’ great expectations into even greater results.” (—Brian A. Gallagher, president and chief executive officer, United Way Worldwide)

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Mark36 on August 9, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I listened to the audio version of this book. It was somewhat interesting, but ......

I am a boomer. From my perspective, the first two thirds of this book was just cheerleading for Millennials. The Millennials are gifted, talented, etc. If you aren't hiring them by the tens of thousands and accommodating their work and life style, you will face imminent doom. I don't quite buy that argument. I tried to look through the prism of a 50+ boomer, an analyst in a relatively conservative industry, a co-owner of a dance studio (focus on 7-17), a yet-to-be discovered playwright and as a parent/uncle to Millennials.

I don't question the research or the results that the authors conducted. Just the presentation of their conclusions. I don't think Millennials will be a tidal wave of extraordinary talent. This exists in each generation.

This book really address the right side of the academic bell curve. First off, eliminate the 20%-30% that will not complete high school. Carve out the large non-assimilated Millennial immigrants. Set aside the Millennial craftsmen who get a job and learn a trade. Slice out the portion that either should not have attended college or attained a degree that lacks relevance. You are now left with a tiny segment of the Millennial population.

From a corporate perspective, you would be a fool not to identify, recruit, and retain high performing Millennials. But you would be just as foolish to mistake wizardry with gadgets as genius or baby-sitting as mentoring.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Jen G. on May 2, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Technically, I am a "Millennial" since this generation is of those born from 1982 to 2000. (I was born the second day of the beginning of the generation and my brother who is 11 years younger than me is in the same generation). I picked this up at the library on a whim since I thought it would be a good indicator for how others perceive my generation and what I can do better in work environments. Let's face it- technology is a huge factor in today's society. This book implies that because of technological leaps- those in the Millennial generation have little to no manners, no etiquette with dealing with other generations, and a lack of respect. Personally, I do not feel that way at all when working with Traditionalists, Boomers, Xers, but I can see how this is a proven issue for those younger and less experienced than me.

Obviously, the book is about "The M-factor," which is the seven factors and trends that makes the generation who they are. These are: Parenting (which I don't agree with AT ALL for me, but I can see it for most of generation), Entitlement (Bingo!!!), Looking for Meaning (Absolutely!), Great Expectations (finding success and fulfillment without taking forever), the need for speed, Social Networking, and finally collaboration. Yes, my generation was always taught that, "You can be anything you want to be," and the aspect of teamwork was everywhere from classes to sports. There are a lot of truths in the book and is important to read. I very much enjoyed it and hope that we can all learn from each other.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By K. Eller on April 15, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I checked this book out from my library when I saw the title. As one of the oldest millennials (born in 1982), I ran into a lot of the problems discussed in this book when I started working full-time.

I like how it provides advice to all of the generations on how to improve communication and make the work experience better for everyone. What it says to millennials is definitely applicable!

I'm not through with the book yet, so I don't want to give a detailed review, but suffice it to say that I'm recommending it to all of my younger cousins and siblings to read before they get out in the "real world." I don't want them to make some of the same mistakes that I did!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By amf0001 VINE VOICE on September 11, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I read it quickly, and there is an easily digestible writing style, but I really do feel you could write 4 densely written pages and the book would be done. It felt like an extended magazine article. It made a few interesting points - if you are a boomer who thinks Millennial's are entitled and over indulged, well what are you doing with your own kids... But I have to say the more they tried to justify how the millenials are not really entitled, the more entitled they sounded. By the end the authors made Millenials sounds like a sweet pile of puppies, happily collaborating, making aps, uploading blogs and putting everything they do on Facebook. It just didn't make it sound like they could really follow through and take real responsibility for a project, though that is what they are all lusting to do.

I work with a lot of 23-30 year olds, and what I see is that a lot more of them are flailing than those described in this book. I definitely agree with the other review that said this book refers to maybe 5-15% of that population, the cream of the college grads.

So interesting, and easy to read, 284 pages long, but not as incisive or intellectual as I would like - perhaps a bit like the Millenials themselves.
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