Customer Reviews


84 Reviews
5 star:
 (65)
4 star:
 (14)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Its pure Magic
It is not always that a book touches you to the deepest core. One such book was the 'The Good Earth' by Pearl S Buck. After a very long time I read a book with a similar impact on me. The book has balanced the fast pace of a thriller with the considered pace of dharma teachings. It holds the attention of the reader through out and one starts identifying with the...
Published on August 23, 2010 by Geetu Goel

versus
13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A missed opportunity..
I am interested in everything about Tibet and Tibetan Buddhism so the premise of this book sounded perfect for my taste. However I was disappointed at the stereotypical characters and the presentation of the Tibetan Buddhist philosophy in simplistic new agey soundbites (and avoiding the less palatable aspects of vajrayana).

This book has double story lines, one...
Published 18 months ago by Benjamin Whitebox


‹ Previous | 1 29 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Its pure Magic, August 23, 2010
This review is from: The Magician of Lhasa (Paperback)
It is not always that a book touches you to the deepest core. One such book was the 'The Good Earth' by Pearl S Buck. After a very long time I read a book with a similar impact on me. The book has balanced the fast pace of a thriller with the considered pace of dharma teachings. It holds the attention of the reader through out and one starts identifying with the characters- in particular Tenzin Dorje. Tibetan Culture, the Prophecy of Padmasambhav, the dedication of the guru and disciple towards each other is fascinating. It paints a picture of a different more gentle world where one can imagine art and culture flowered. On the other hand the cut throat world of big business flows with its relentless pursuit of winning at all cost. And at the point when dharma crosses the corporate path, magic happens.

Then through a series of conversations, the teacher explains the correct perspective on issues troubling the young hero. These conversations are universal in their appeal and would benefit anyone reading the books. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to understand & apply Buddhist thought to their daily lives. Congratulation for having written a very very special book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Magician from Perth, Australia, October 6, 2010
By 
Donovan Juan (Perth, WA Australia) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Magician of Lhasa (Paperback)
My mother recently read this book and absolutely loved it, so much so she asked me to post this review on Amazon to share her thoughts about this remarkable book:

"I loved The Magician of Lhasa. Seldom does a book move me to the point that immediately upon completing it, I write to the author to thank him or her for sharing the gift of their storytelling. I tend to choose books that are more difficult to read, as I always enjoy a literary challenge. This book was a pleasurable read. It reached me in places not many other books have.

David Michie combines spirituality and science seamlessly. I enjoyed the way he moved between time, place and space. I followed him back and forth through Tibet, London, California and India, through different time-periods but never for a moment felt what was happening to the characters was too vast or too distant for me to touch, smell and feel. He took me along with him and I felt completely at home in each time, place and space. The story he has weaved - the people you grow to feel for are so real - I wanted it to not be fiction.

There were sections of the book when I felt as if the Dharma was personally spoken just to me. And I literally found myself weeping with joy.

Read The Magician of Lhasa ... you will not be disappointed."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A truly "magical" story, October 3, 2010
This review is from: The Magician of Lhasa (Paperback)
I think this tidbit, from the publishers website, can give you a bit of insight to what this book has in store... "Trapdoor Books believes that by giving a new voice to authors without imposing overtly commercial constraints on their work, the stranglehold of formulaic writing can be broken and the world of fiction, along with the real world, can provide a better and more rewarding experience for all of us." Wow!

I believe wholeheartedly they, Trapdoor Books being the "they", have truly broken the mold with this book. Not only is the idea fresh, but it's fiction, not a manual on Buddhism or meditation. Maybe I am just not as aware, but I believe there aren't many "Buddhist" themed fictional works out there, and if I'm wrong point me in the right direction.

That being said, I haven't sat down and read a book this quickly in a while. The story is laid out in two separate tales, each running concurrently, it seems at first, throughout the book. The first story introduces us to a young and upcoming nano-technology scientist named Matt Lester. Matt's claim to fame is a project titled Nanobot, which sparks interest from an overseas investor who is willing to move Matt, and his girlfriend, to the US to broaden the horizon of the project. After much chagrin he is able to convince said girlfriend to move away from her family and trust in his and her own career. The future is bright, or so it seems...

The second storyline transports us to 1959 during the Red Army invasion of Tibet. We are acquainted to Tenzin Dorje, a young and novice Tibetan monk. After news reaches his monastery, his Lama sets in motion a plan that the monks in the monastery had been fearing, yet planning for, many years ahead of the invasion. Tenzin, his brother Palden as well as his teacher are given the task of "smuggling" ancient Dharma scrolls out of Tibet so that they not fall in the hands of the Chinese, but also to fulfill a prophecy left behind by Padmasambhava himself.

As we follow the struggles that the three have in escaping Tibet, Matt has a chance encounter, albeit it at 3am, with a Tibetan monk who resides across the street from the new place he and his girlfriend move into. This sets up our path to the conclusion of the book, little by little hints are given as to how both stories intersect.

The only negative about this book is the fact it ended. I really enjoyed this story and hope that there will be a second installment? Maybe a series? Anyone at Trapdoor, is this gonna happen? Please?!?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A missed opportunity.., March 25, 2013
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I am interested in everything about Tibet and Tibetan Buddhism so the premise of this book sounded perfect for my taste. However I was disappointed at the stereotypical characters and the presentation of the Tibetan Buddhist philosophy in simplistic new agey soundbites (and avoiding the less palatable aspects of vajrayana).

This book has double story lines, one set in Tibet in 1959 (during the Chinese invasion) and another in 2007 in London and LA. The Tibet story concerns the efforts of a lama and his two young students to smuggle some precious ancient Buddhist texts out of Tibet to save them from destruction by the Chinese soldiers. The modern story follows a young couple as they relocate in LA from London when the man accepts a fabulous job offer from a tech company. Inevitably and preposterously the two story lines of course intersect. Multiple story lines seem to have become a fad of our times and many writers employ it as if it were the 11th commandment. In the context of the overall story in this book however, the structure seemed appropriate.

Between the two, I didn't find the modern (Matt and Isabella) story line all that interesting. On top of that (or maybe because) the characters came across as both banal and insincere. I also felt there was a lot of extra padding stuffed in there for no apparent reason other than to add more pages to the manuscript (so that it approached the magical 300). For the record, the quantum physics related passages are very few and uninformative and if the writer really wanted to make a claim about parallels between the explanations of quantum physics and the Dharma, I'm not sure why his protagonist had to work in nanotechnology instead.. A quantum physicist getting a cool job offer from the UCLA could have possibly worked just as well, if not better.. And by the way, which wine enthusiast (especially after a deep search on the internet about the subject) would decide to move to LA to get a job in the wine industry but would be surprised to find out after the move that the heart of the Californian wine industry instead beats in the Napa Valley near SF..?! And also, in the story the name of Isabella's supposedly typical Sicillian father is Julio.. Unfortunately for him, this is a classic Spanish name, not Italian. The Italian counterpart is Giulio. Sloppy research? It is things like these that prevented me from immersing myself in their story.

The Tibet story line, on the other hand, was much more absorbing and believable within its world and context. I enjoyed this story and would have preferred it to be expanded and honestly, to be the whole book. It is, in fact, the heart and soul of the book and makes the other time line look worse than it is. All the philosophical points could have been made within the Tibet story anyway.

On that note, I see that some have found this book deeply philosophical but I found it superficial on that level and somewhat evangelically patronizing as the writer drills in his points without any pretensions of decorum.

Overall, despite the cool Tibet story line and some thought provoking nuggets of wisdom from the wise monks, I see the book as a missed opportunity. It feels like Mr. Michie thought the readers would be bored if he just stuck to a story set in Tibet with monks so he slapped in a modern couple living in LA faced with not uncommon relationship issues and a greedy venture capitalist. I would like to see Mr. Michie write more fantastic stories set in Tibet (which he seems to have a keen interest in and respect for) rather than in modern day LA and the world of corporate intrigue. There are many other writers already squeezing that lemon. Ditto for self-help books for pseudo Buddhists with cheesy titles:
- Hurry Up And Meditate: Your Starter Kit For Inner Peace And Better Health
- Buddhism For Busy People: Finding Happiness In An Uncertain World

Maybe he should decide if he wants to be a serious fiction writer or a self-help book peddler..

'nuff said..
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another great book from David, March 27, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
It strikes so many chords in me about life after life. This is done in a gentle and enlightening way. I think I am a buddhist in thought.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars wonderful read, October 22, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I throughly enjoyed this book. As a fellow traveller on the Path I found the book full of insights and teachings. I highly recommend this book!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I will read this one again!, October 17, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This was full of Buddhist teaching stories, given through various life scenarios that I could easily relate to. It was very engaging and I loved the parallel stories. I was inspired by this book and hope there will be many more of a similar nature from this gifted writer. Buddhist fiction is my new favorite go-to read. Thank you, David Michie!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Delightful, October 13, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Extremely enjoyable. I am drawn to Buddhism philosophy but have been ignorant of it"s practice. This was very informative without being dry.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful lesson in dharma (life purpose), July 31, 2013
By 
D. Force (Atlanta, GA.) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
What a beautiful and surprising story. Lovely story about dharma (life purpose) with some great twists. You'll completely love it!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, December 5, 2010
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Magician of Lhasa (Paperback)
Disappointing. Cardboard, stereotypical characters including the idea-stealing, greedy, corporate, billionaire CEO who gets his in the end. Completely predicatble with no surprises and a couple dangling storylines at the end. Do not look here to learn about Buddhism; read books by Red Pine instead. You won't find out anything about quantum physics either for that matter.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 29 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

The Magician of Lhasa
The Magician of Lhasa by David Michie (Paperback - December 7, 2009)
$14.99
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.