The Magicians: A Novel and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.00
  • Save: $6.96 (44%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Magicians: A Novel has been added to your Cart
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Thank you for your consideration in our product. Ships direct from Amazon! Qualifies for Prime and Supersaver shipping. Pages crisp and clean. No marks. No underlining. No highlighting. Cover has a crease on the back corner.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Magicians: A Novel Paperback – May 25, 2010


See all 37 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$9.04
$5.04 $0.99

Frequently Bought Together

The Magicians: A Novel + The Magician King: A Novel (The Magicians) + The Magician's Land: A Novel (Magicians Trilogy)
Price for all three: $39.15

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The Good Girl by Mary Kubica
Discover an addictive, suspenseful debut thriller filled with twists and turns that will keep you engrossed from start to finish. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Plume (May 25, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0452296293
  • ISBN-13: 978-0452296299
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.4 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (901 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,187 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Amazon Best of the Month, August 2009: Mixing the magic of beloved children's fantasy classics (from Narnia and Oz to Harry Potter and Earthsea) with the sex, excess, angst, and anticlimax of life in college and beyond, Lev Grossman's Magicians reimagines modern-day fantasy for grownups. Quentin Coldwater lives in a state of perpetual melancholy, privately obsessed with his childhood books about the enchanted land of Fillory. When he’s admitted to the surreptitious Brakebills Academy for an education in magic, Quentin finds mastering spells is tedious (and love is even more fraught). He also discovers his power has thrilling potential--though it's unclear what he should do with it once he's moved with his new magician cohorts to New York City. Then they discover the magical land of Fillory is real and launch an expedition to use their powers to set things right in the kingdom--which, naturally, turns out to be a much murkier proposition than expected. The Magicians breathes life into a cast of characters you want to know--if the people you want to know are charismatic, brilliant, complex, flawed magicians--and does what Quentin claims books never really manage to do: "get you out, really out, of where you were and into somewhere better. " Or if not better, at least a heck of a lot more interesting. --Mari Malcolm --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Grossman's novel is a postadolescent Harry Potter, following apprentices in the art of magic through their time as students at an upstate New York college to their postcollegiate Manhattan misdeeds, with jaded ennui tempering the magical aura. Mark Bramhall, a smooth baritone with a supple speaking voice, reads carefully, with a slight air of heaviness and sorrow. He pauses frequently and freights the silences with a tenderness well befitting a coming-of-age novel. A Viking hardcover (Reviews, June 1). (July)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Lev Grossman is the author of the New York Times bestselling novels The Magicians and The Magician King. The third book in the trilogy, The Magician's Land, will be published in August 2014. The New Yorker named The Magicians as one of the best books of 2009. In 2011 Grossman was awarded the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer by the World Science Fiction Society.

Grossman is also the book critic at Time magazine, and he has written about books and technology for the New York Times, Salon, the Wall Street Journal, Wired, Lingua Franca, the Village Voice and the Believer, as well as NPR.

He lives in Brooklyn with his wife and three children. He's 43, slightly built and probably wouldn't last long in a post-apocalyptic, eye-for-an-eye world.

Related Media


Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
260
4 star
174
3 star
161
2 star
168
1 star
138
See all 901 customer reviews

Popular Discussion Topics

beta: what do you think?
  • "Writing" 255
  • "Characters" 217
  • "Action" 48
  • "Funny" 30
  • "Emotional" 25
  • All Topics

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

719 of 830 people found the following review helpful By Theoden Humphrey VINE VOICE on July 1, 2009
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Stop thinking this is a fantasy book. I know, I know, it's called "The Magicians," the plot synopsis references all three of the most famous fantasy series and describes a handful of familiar fantasy tropes, including the school of magic and the fairy tale land come to actual life. But forget all of that. I have read more fantasy books than I can remember -- I'm named for a character in perhaps the most famous fantasy series of all time -- and I'm telling you: "The Magicians" is not a fantasy.

It has fantastic elements, yes. There is magic; there is a school for magic, where the characters learn to cast spells, using hand gestures and arcane language and strange mystical components -- Ziploc bag full of mutton fat, anyone? -- and there is a voyage from this world to another, a land of naiads and fauns and magical speaking animals, gods and demons, kings and queens, quests and wishes. But this book is something very different from the usual fantasy novel. In "The Magicians," Lev Grossman has done something unusual, and remarkable, perhaps even unique: this is a grown-up fantasy. This book is to fantasy what "The Grapes of Wrath" is to travel books, what "The Metamorphosis" is to self-help: so much more depressing and visceral and funny and horrifying, and genuine, and fascinating, and hard to read and therefore valuable, that it doesn't belong in the same category despite sharing some central traits. The setting is imagined, and there are supernatural things that happen, but make no mistake: this is a serious novel.
Read more ›
34 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
408 of 484 people found the following review helpful By Mitchell M. Tse VINE VOICE on July 24, 2009
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The Magicians by Lev Grossman is a well written story about a magical world, a fairly detailed world of rules and exceptions. The story, at one point, had a very poignant concept of what magic may be: That if the universe was a house that God made for everyone, that Magic was the tools he left behind, possibly by accident, in the garage. That perhaps using Magic was as dangerous as kids finding these power tools and such, and using them without direction or precaution.

The characters in the story are fairly fleshed out, in that you have a good sense of what drives them, what makes them tick, you can see the dynamics between them. The description of the magic school Brakebills is very well done, filled with things that people don't understand about and that has a life of its own. And while at the very end there's something that can lead to a sequel, there's definitely an ending to this book, no gimmick cliffhanger that requires you to wait for the next book.

Definitely, the book had the makings of a great story. Yet, I was left numb at the end, not happy, not sad, not scared. And that, really, is why I left this review with 3 stars. I read fiction to be entertained. This entertainment can be in the form of humor, feeling good, scared, excited, titillated, insightful, or some combination thereof. Instead, when I read this book, I saw through the eyes of a fairly apathetic protagonist, who messes things up and blames everyone else, who had chances to become a hero and fails each time. I read about a person who wanted something, got it, didn't like it, and became apathetic. I read about the antagonist being defeated, the protagonist winning in the end, and no one feeling ... well, happy for having accomplished anything. Perhaps this is what real life can be.
Read more ›
60 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Patrick Shepherd VINE VOICE on September 22, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Magic is real. There are schools for magicians. There are universes and worlds that are inhabited by monsters and fairies and are crying desperately for someone to rule them wisely. A pretty good set of premises for this new work. But there are also problems with this set up, and Grossman, rather than hide them under the rug, takes them out and gives them careful inspection.

Quentin is our protagonist, a 'gifted' child, surely slated for MIT or some equivalent college. But he's also lonely, isolated, and wishes that the world had something more to offer than humdrum, everyday reality and is sure that he is slated to be something more than just another cog in a corporate machine. So when he is magically transported to the Brakebills school to take a very unusual test, he begins to feel that his childhood dreams should really come true, and he can really be happy. But things don't quite work out the way he thought they would.

There are obvious parallels between this book and the Harry Potter and Narnia books, but the point of departure here is that we are dealing with much older characters, people who are looking for something to fill their need for what should be their purpose in life. And it is on exactly this point that this book offers something very different. After all, just exactly what do wizards do when there is no great quest, no great evil overlord to overthrow, no grand adventure just waiting to be experienced? The answer this book gives is a highly realistic one, and the picture it paints is not pretty, and strongly reminded me of some of the works by the 'Lost Generation' of writers. And then, when a real quest comes along, once again its resolution is not what you might expect, and there is real pain and failures to be accounted for.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?