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The Maker Movement Manifesto: Rules for Innovation in the New World of Crafters, Hackers, and Tinkerers Hardcover – September 25, 2013


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill; 1 edition (September 25, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0071821120
  • ISBN-13: 978-0071821124
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 0.9 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #31,150 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

MARK HATCH is CEO of TechShop, a membership-based, do-it-yourself (DIY) makerspace. It provides the digital and physical tools to make almost anything. TechShop members have made everything from robots and a lunar lander to a successful iPad case and craft businesses.


More About the Author

Mark Hatch, CEO and co-founder of TechShop, is a former Green Beret, an innovation revolutionary and a leader in the Maker Movement. He has held executive positions focused on innovation, disruptive technology and entrepreneurship at large and small firms including Avery Dennison, Kinko's and Health Net.

The San Francisco Business Times presented Mark a "Bay Area's Most Admired CEO Award" and Fast Company has recognized him in their "Who's Next" column. TechShop also won the EXPY Award, given to the "experience stager of the year." His book, The Maker Movement Manifesto, came out in September of 2013.

Mark is a recognized leader in the global maker movement and is a sought after speaker and consultant on innovation, advanced manufacturing and leadership. He has spoken to groups from GE, Ford, P&G, ExxonMobile, Kraft, and many other Fortune 500 firms. He has presented at events and universities like TEDx, The Clinton Global Initiative, the Council on Foreign Relations, Singularity U, UC Berkeley, and Harvard.

Mark has appeared on ABC, CBS, NBC, Bloomberg, CNN and Fox among others. He has also been quoted in numerous prominent magazines and newspapers like Bloomberg Business, FastCompany, Inc, Forbes, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The LA Times, The San Francisco Chronicle, and he has published a number of articles including an opinion piece for the Washington Post.

Mark holds an M.B.A. from the Drucker Center at the Claremont Graduate University and a B.A. in Economics from the University of California at Irvine.

Through TechShop, Mark is focused on radically democratizing access to the tools of innovation by providing the lowest cost access to tools the world has ever seen. TechShop is crushing barriers to innovation and building new and exciting pathways for the creative class to do what it does best. Create. With six locations open and 100's planned over the next decade, TechShop is already reshaping how the world does innovation and manufacturing.

Mark likens TechShop to Kinko's 3D. Kinko's was the largest public access computer and quick print platform in the world. TechShop is already the largest public access tools and computer enabled manufacturing platform in the world.

With partners like Autodesk, Ford, GE, BMW, Arizona State University and Lowe's along with governmental agencies like DARPA (for advanced manufacturing) and the Veterans Administration (for Veteran's training) TechShop has already begun to significantly impact the economic development opportunities in every community it is built. Six companies, of the 100's) that have launched out of TechShop have already begun to change the world.

Inc Magazine awarded TechShop with the Inc 500/5000 private company award (#565) and named TechShop as the #37th fastest growing private retail company, and the #34th growing private company in the entire bay area.

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Customer Reviews

Mark really laid out a great vision and foundation for the Maker Movement.
Jeremiah Owyang
Places like TechSpace make it possible because the everyday person can get access to tools, computer programs, help, and everything else they need at a small cost.
Andy Shuping
Here is the first chapter of the book in pdf if you want to read some of this for yourself.
John Bloom

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Thinking Reader on October 7, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you're a skilled professional who is sidelined in this economy and have 10, 20, 30 or more years of experience, your future may depend upon fully engaging in the MAKER MOVEMENT and finding a truly fulfilling way to apply your talents. The MAKER MOVEMENT MANIFESTO highlights the importance of being able to fail quickly and inexpensively so this ever important and necessary cycle of trial & error can lead to success. I loved this book and found it to be a very encouraging note of optimism in an otherwise dark economy. Every technical institute/college program should make this required reading! Democratization has finally come to the inventing field and the future is looking much brighter.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jeremiah Owyang on October 15, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Mark really laid out a great vision and foundation for the Maker Movement. Not only does he define the trend, he ties it back to earlier times when people used to be "makers" as careers. His view of the tinkerers makers, hobbyists and how corporations will move into and sponsor this space is real. I recommend this book, and will invite Mark to share it with my community.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By John Chancellor TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 22, 2013
Format: Hardcover
If you have ever worked with anyone who had an idea for a new product and wanted to build a prototype and eventually launch it, then you well understand the enormous cost involved. For most would be inventors or new product developers, their ideas die a slow death because of the cost constraints of developing a working model and then finding financing to launch production. But there is a very exciting movement that is changing all that.

Mark Hatch, CEO of TechShop and the author of The Maker Movement Manifesto, has written about the breakthroughs that are now allowing new product prototypes to be developed at a fraction of what it once cost. Coupled with the new innovative ways for the small entrepreneur to raise capital via Kickstarter or similar type crowd funding sources, a revolution is actually taking place in the way new products are developed.

Mr. Hatch writes with a passion and enthusiasm rarely found in this type of book. It is extremely exciting to read about the way TechShop is empowering ordinary people to do extra-ordinary things. The concept of TechShop is quite simple, provide access to high powered tools, software and training to artists, inventors and ordinary people on an as needed basis for a low monthly cost. The lists of machines is quite impressive- there are laser cutters, CNC milling machines, 3D printers, commercial grade sewing machines just to name a few. The software available is extensive. And to make it all available and meaningful, TechShop conducts extensive classes on how to use the machines and the software. There are also staff called Dream Consultants to give guidance and help when needed. One of the huge benefits is the collaboration among the members.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By NoVA Reader on May 30, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I really, really wanted to like this book. It had been on my wish list for awhile, then waiting on the pile of books to read. I finally read it a few days ago. Ended up with this feeling of deep disappointment.

Yes, it does cover the major technologies in use (3d-printing, welding, laser-cutting, crafts, etc). And some of them are cited in the production of real products, whose teams may have appeared at Techshop at some point. However, this is less a manual of what those tools are and how they're used than an expanded, breathless advertisement for Techshop. Very few pages omit some mention of it. This, too, is OK, but I guess I thought it would be more inspiring and less commercialized. The only thing it is missing is a link to SIGN UP NOW!

For a pointer to shoestring operations with the same sort of capabilities - which sometimes vary wildly in depth - see [...] for the makerspace or hackerspace near you. The key part which they have is the notion of community. Techshop is exactly like a gym membership - you go there, get whatever you need done, and leave. It's otherwise very sterile in terms of the community and sharing aspects of making things.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Katherine Wilson on November 21, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book was a simplistic lowbrow cheerleading exercise that didn't celebrate making so much as entrepreneurship. Techshops are a great development, sure, but I expect a book to be more than a marketing exercise.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By John Bloom on February 9, 2014
Format: Hardcover
Hatch blends a lot of stories in with what I would consider a really good argument for why the maker movement will change the way we develop and manufacture goods. My only critique is that while the content of the book was really good the flow was hard to follow. So here is my breakdown of it.

Chapters 1-3: Introduction
Chapters 4-6: The 3 pillars of the maker movement (my words)
Chapters 7-9: Examples of people, companies, and schools that are getting involved
Chapter 10: A call to action

Chapters 1-3 present an overview and are the intro to what being a maker is all about. This includes the manifesto and its tenants: Make, Share, Give, Learn, Tool Up, Play, Participate, Support, and Change. I appreciated his point about people were created in the image of a creative God and thus creating is part of who we are.

One of the key components to the success of makers is the idea of free innovation and the ability to fail fast. With tools like 3D printers and computer controlled mills and routers people can built prototypes for a few hundred dollars where in the past they would have get engineering firms involved which could cost upwards of $100,000. With this low barrier to entry people are willing to try ideas that they never would have in the past. This allows them to know if an idea will make it or fail rather quickly and cheaply. While a few hundred dollars is not free, compared to $100,000 it might as well be.

Lastly as part of the introduction Hatch explains how important the community of people is to the success of an idea. While some people can go it alone most of the success that people are having is through communities that provide connections to other people and an atmosphere of creativity.
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