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The Maker's Diet Paperback – April 5, 2005


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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jordan S. Rubin is the founder of Garden of Life, a health and wellness company that empowers people to attain extraordinary health. He has earned degrees in naturopathic medicine, nutrition, and natural therapies. Rubin has written three books and has appeared on more than 300 TV and radio programs worldwide. He has also written numerous articles for top nutritional and medical journals.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Berkley; Reprint edition (April 5, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0425204138
  • ISBN-13: 978-0425204139
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (125 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #23,854 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Jordan S. Rubin is the founder of Garden of Life, a health and wellness company that empowers people to attain extraordinary health. He has earned degrees in naturopathic medicine, nutrition, and natural therapies. Rubin has written three books and has appeared on more than 300 TV and radio programs worldwide. He has also written numerous articles for top nutritional and medical journals.

Customer Reviews

Please read the book first!
F. Stokkeland
It is a very informative book that will teach you a lot about your internal body and help guide you on a healthy eating lifestyle.
stephanie r. singleton
I think that is pushed a little bit too much.
Julie Ann Lanz

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

138 of 141 people found the following review helpful By F. Stokkeland on August 4, 2006
Format: Paperback
First off, I have suffered with GERD (reflux disease) since I got a stomach ulcer 10 years ago. And I have been using Losec/Nexium steady for years. If I forgot to take it, I got terrible heartburns and such ... I just started the Makers Diet almost two weeks ago, and I stopped using Nexium after the first day, and after the first week I haven't even taken any antacids, like Tums or Garden of Life's Acid Defense. It's a miracle!

I also feel the need to comment on a couple of statements from former reviews.

One statement I find to be just not true:

"First off it is very centered on a protein, animal based diet. I thought there would be more influence on fruit, seeds and grains."

He focuses a lot on what we need from _both_ animal _and_ vegetarian sources. We need fibers, fats (fatty acids), enzymes, vitamins and proteins from both animal and vegetarian sources. This is pretty clear in his book.

Another statement: "It is a very rigid program for a lifetime."

I feel this also is misplaced. The Diet is built up of three two week stages, and the first two weeks is pretty rigid (getting us off our addictions to sugar, caffeine and such) and is designed to fix insulin, infection and inflammation problems. The two next weeks we can eat more stuff, and the last two weeks and the rest of our lives, he simply points out stuff that is not good for us. If we complete the diet to this stage, we will have a stronger immune system that can much better handle it when we don't find just healthy food, or if we have a good time eating cake and candy and stuff.

Another comment: "Cheating, forget it! He suggests if you absolutely must eat things that are off the list, do it within an hours time to avoid any ill effects.
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75 of 80 people found the following review helpful By Brian P. Coughlin on July 26, 2005
Format: Paperback
Well, to start I have not only read the book, but followed the diet. I think as far as health and nutrition are concerned the book makes scense. I have lost aproximately 15-20 lbs following the regiment outlined and feel great. I'm still a bit lacked when it comes to doing excersise, but no one's perfect. That being said, this is the type of diet that one could easily follow for life. The first inital stps are difficult, but in the end it's fairly easy.

From a literary standpoint I would have liked to see a little more scientific refrence in the book, though it was decent. I also agree with the comments of another reviewer who wrote that some more biblical refrence would have been nice when talking about where the mention of specific herbs and foods are in the Bible. I also got a bit tired of the Ruben's personal sory. It was a bit over the top at times.

His chapter on 25 ways to get yourself sick was great and made me laugh while being fearful at the same time. I also like the sections on various foods and why they are either good or bad for you. He structured the book nicely and the recipes at the end were a nice throw in.

I must admit that I am Catholic, hence my opinion being somewhat biased, and enjoyed the biblical refrences. It has made me more aware of biblical foods and I have since purchased a book title 1000 Jewish recipes. In a strange way this book has brought me closer to my faith and I am reading the bible again for the first time in many many years.

I did read some other reviews that seemed pretty negative towards this book. I am aware of the claims against Ruben Jordan, though I think some of them are a bit over the top. I looked at the web site for the school he received his NMD from and I really don't have issue with it.
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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Donna L. Leissner on June 28, 2005
Format: Paperback
The Maker's Diet by Jordan Rubin, is the first holistic approach that I have read about dieting and health. I have recently completed a BS in Holistic Nutrition and when I came across the ad for this book in an e-newsletter from Dr. Mercola, I had to get it and read it. After reading it the first time I was very excited about his vision of restoring optimal health to people through knowledge about not just diet but lifestyle as well. We are not compartmentalized beings but whole units and to treat just one part of us leaves the untreated areas out of balance. I read the book, went on my own 40-day experience and then started a small group in my church. We have recently completed our 40-day journey together and have heard several good reports. People are amazed at the results from just changing the diet alone but have learned the necessity of also incorporating exercise to their lifestyle. I highly recommend this program to everyone. The beauty of it is you can always repeat phase one or phase two if phase three is not giving you the results you desire. The text is highly readable, easy to understand and the approach, again, is a holistic one which I think is very important.
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36 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Quo Primum on May 7, 2007
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent book, and some of its advice has many parallels with books such as Nutrition and Physical Degeneration, Nourishing Traditions, Traditional Foods Are Your Best Medicine, Know Your Fats, and even some concepts from The Zone. What's especially surprising is that it is even supported by the writings of St. Hildegard of Bingen, who wrote 800 years ago.

For those who have less then positive impressions about the book, I ask you to patiently consider:

1) The best source of Vitamin D is the sun, yes, but very few americans spend enough time in the sun due to school and occupations, many wear makeup with sunscreen etc, or live at latitudes or in pollution, all which will prevent a body from manufacturing vitamin D. The Arthritis magazine published about two years ago that most americans are deficient in Vit D, and this may be a cause of Rheumatoid arthritis. Therefore, we should try to supplement our diets with NATURAL vitamin D, which can only be found in butter and other animal products. If you are on a cholesteral reducing medication, your body might not be able to manufacture any vitamin D protein. (Wise Traditions, Fall 2006, p 21.) If you are not sure, your doctor can test your vit D levels. It may be an eye-opener.

2) it is a misconception that betacarotene is vitamin A - it is PRO-vitamin A, and requires a conversion to be made into actual Vitamin A. Many people genetically make this conversion very poorly, therefore it is necessary to suppliment. Man made sources of Vitamin A are very toxic, while natural sources such as cod liver oil, are not. Vitamin A can only be found in animal products.
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