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The Making of a Fly: The Genetics of Animal Design Paperback – April 15, 1992

ISBN-13: 978-0632030484 ISBN-10: 0632030488 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 228 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell; 1 edition (April 15, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0632030488
  • ISBN-13: 978-0632030484
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 7.4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,011,795 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Understanding how a multicelluar animal develops from a single cell (the fertilized egg) poses one of the greatest challenges in biology today. Development from egg to adult involves the sequential expression of virtually the whole of an organisms genetic instructions both in the mother as she lays down developmental cues in the egg, and in the embryo itself. Most of our present information on the role of genes in development comes from the invertebrate fruit fly, Drosophila. The two authors of this text (amongst the foremost authorities in the world) follow the developmental process from fertilization through the primitive structural development of the body plan of the fly after cleavage into the differentiation of the variety of tissues, organ and body parts that together define the fly. The developmental processes are fully explained throughout the text in the modern language of molecular biology and genetics. This text represents the vital synthesis of the subject that many have been waiting for and it will enable many specific courses in developmental biology and molecular genetics to be focussed upon it appealing to 2nd and 3rd year students in these disciplines as well as in biochemistry, neurobiology and zoology. It will also have widespread appeal amongst researchers.

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Customer Reviews

To all my fellow skeptics, I highly recommend this book.
Bob 443
I teleported myself as planned, but I was unaware my genes had been fused with a house fly that was trapped in the telepod with me!
rollerroman
After this read, I can now tell you I have the best genetics knowledge of the fly that 23 million dollars can buy!
Matthew Song

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

561 of 649 people found the following review helpful By John Taylor Kesler on April 25, 2011
Format: Paperback
I was fortunate enough to buy this at the bargain price of $19,087,354 there must have been a sale because the next day it was listed at $23M. I was very pleased to find upon arrival that the book contained very useful information, however to be honest I was expecting a few more pictures for the price paid. I highly recommend this to all my associates, I have many acquaintances with children in only the best private schools who will be buying several copies. If the price has you worried, ask yourself the American question: "can you really put a price on good education?"
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245 of 301 people found the following review helpful By JAS on April 26, 2011
Format: Paperback
As a Wall Street investment banker, I typically enjoy only the finest things in life. Nice cars, nice houses, and nice cigars. And speaking of cigars, I only light them with the most expensive currency available. Lately, I have run low on my collection of old $1,000 bills, so I was excited to see a book for $23 million on Amazon. I decided to place an order for the book (super saver shipping, of course), and received my copy of "The Making of a Fly: The Genetics of Animal Design." At nearly 230 pages in length, each sheet of paper in the book is worth $200,000. I cracked the book open and ripped a page out. My troubles began at this stage. After prepping my Gran Habano Corojo, I lit the page. It burned much faster than American currency. I scrambled to get my cigar lit, but the page burned so fast I had no choice but to drop it. And I dropped it on my polar bearskin rug. Unfortunately, The rug caught on fire quickly and I had to scramble out and onto the deck. Oh yes, I should mention that I was on my 140 foot yacht at the time. I called my servants at once to put out the fire, but the gold plated fire extinguishers I kept aboard were unfortunately being replated at the time. We had to board the lifeboat (a 30 foot ski-boat) and leave the yacht. It was painful watching my yacht burn, but the greatest tragedy is that the remainder of the book also burned. I tried to obtain another copy of the book, but alas, it had gone down in price.
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41 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Edmund Paley on February 19, 2002
Format: Paperback
What a great book! Lawrence has managed to take the long history and complex details of genetic studies on drosophila development, and synthesize it all into an accessible summary that anyone can understand. This is by far the most concise and straightforward summary of fly development, and should be considered a must-read for anyone who cares about developmental biology. OK, full-time fly people will probably find it mostly too basic, but for the rest of us it's just right. Sidebars on the different techniques provide useful details for those who care without interrupting the flow of the prose. Defiantely recommended. Plus, the cover picture is really cool.
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27 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Howard Schneider on November 26, 2000
Format: Paperback
The general reader interested in not only how a single fly egg cell develops into a complex, formed fly, but how genetic and molecular biological experiments are used to determine such mechanisms, will find this book useful. The maternal systems that establish positional information in the egg cell, followed by the development of parasegments, and followed by expression of groups of cells, are described. It is shown that a large amount of genetic information is required to simply organize the embryo, besides building it. Many of the genes discussed have homologues in other higher animals such as vertebrates.
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16 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Bob 443 on June 20, 2006
Format: Paperback
For the uninitiated such as I, it has been entirely mysterious how a strand of DNA manages to express itself as a finished animal. Indeed, I really do believe evolution works, and that the information that describes an individual animal is passed on through the coding of DNA. But it has been uncomfortable accepting this principle on faith because authorities in the field say so. Here is a book that describes the process and explains how scientists detect and measure the mechanism. To all my fellow skeptics, I highly recommend this book.
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35 of 46 people found the following review helpful By James Earl Carter on April 26, 2011
Format: Paperback
I purchased this book as an investment property. I see my $1,234,349 investment has now paid off handsomely as the book value has topped $23 million. I can't decide if I should list this for sale or await further gains in value.
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45 of 61 people found the following review helpful By Joshua Cross on April 25, 2011
Format: Paperback
I normally have a strict policy of paying no more than $10 million for a book, but after previewing "The Making of a Fly," I decided to remove 1.3 million other books from my wish list and free up the cash. From the first chapter ("When a Mommy Fly and a Daddy Fly Love Each Other Very Much...") to coverage of a fly's development ("Buzzing Around People's Ears: Nature or Nurture?"), Peter Lawrence details the minutiae of fly life most humans would never know. The complimentary fly swatter was an unexpected treat, although I believe the publishers may have upped the price for this reason.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 25, 2000
Format: Paperback
I read this book when I was doing a project on drosophila menogaster, and this book really helped. There were some things that were hard to understand, but for the most part it was imformative and concise.
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