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The Male Brain Paperback


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The Male Brain + The Female Brain + Brain Sex: The Real Difference Between Men and Women
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 271 pages
  • Publisher: Harmony (January 25, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0767927540
  • ISBN-13: 978-0767927543
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.3 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (137 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #18,411 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. In this utterly fascinating follow-up to her bestselling The Female Brain, Harvard neuropsychiatrist Brizendine leads readers through the lifespan of a man's brain, using lively prose and personable anecdotes to turn complex scientific research into a highly accessible romp. Among other salient info, readers will learn why it is what young boys seem unable to stay still (they are learning through "embodied cognition"); why behaviors may change so suddenly during puberty (among other changes, testosterone increases 20-fold); the nature of irritability in teens ("boys' hormones prime them for aggressive and territorial behaviors"); and the ways in which chemicals, physical touch, and play bond fathers with their children. With clearly detailed scientific explanations for how characteristics like anger expression, analysis of facial expression, and spatial manipulation differ between the sexes, Brizendine's review of brain and behavioral research should net a broad audience, from parents of boys to psychology students to fans of her first volume. Brizendine also includes an appendix regarding the brain and sexual orientation, as well as lengthy endnotes and an exhaustive reference list. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

"In this utterly fascinating follow-up to her bestselling The Female Brain, Harvard neuropsychiatrist Brizendine leads readers through the lifespan of a man's brain, using lively prose and personable anecdotes to turn complex scientific research into a highly accessible romp. Among other salient info, readers will learn why it is what young boys seem unable to stay still (they are learning through "embodied cognition"); why behaviors may change so suddenly during puberty (among other changes, testosterone increases 20-fold); the nature of irritability in teens ("boys' hormones prime them for aggressive and territorial behaviors"); and the ways in which chemicals, physical touch, and play bond fathers with their children. With clearly detailed scientific explanations for how characteristics like anger expression, analysis of facial expression, and spatial manipulation differ between the sexes, Brizendine's review of brain and behavioral research should net a broad audience, from parents of boys to psychology students to fans of her first volume. Brizendine also includes an appendix regarding the brain and sexual orientation, as well as lengthy endnotes and an exhaustive reference list."--Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

"As a woman who has known complicated men her whole life, I can't help but wish The Male Brain had been around when I was a girl. Dr. Louann Brizendine's lucid, lively, and always fascinating discussion of how the male brain works (and why) has enlightened me in more ways than I can count. Now I can't wait to give the book to all my women friends."
—Jane Fonda, actress and author of My Life So Far

"Dr. Brizendine has marshaled a host of impressive data and insights and presented them in an elegant and entertaining way to clearly illustrate men's reality--as infants, boys, teens, lovers, husbands, fathers and workers. It's a deep dive into the worlds of men, as well as a fascinating read. And along the way, you will pick up some valuable tips to help you understand, appreciate and connect with the men in your life."
--Helen Fisher, Ph.D., author of Why Him? Why Her?

"It takes an extraordinary woman like Dr. Louann Brizendine to understand the male brain. She brings the latest in state-of-the-art science in helping us to understand the most ancient and primal of male passions and desires--and viva le difference! Highly recommended."
-Dean Ornish, author of The Spectrum

"The remarkable brain science behind Mars and Venus in a really enjoyable read! I think that this book, along with The Female Brain should be read by every parent, child, husband, wife, employer, employee, and dating age adult – they bring love and understanding into our most important, and sometimes most frustrating relationships."
-Martin L. Rossman, M.D., Clinical Faculty, UCSF; Founder, TheHealingMind.org, Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco
 


From the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

I would read this book as just another interesting book, nothing more.
error
In this book, Dr. Brizendine does for the brains of men and boys what she did for the brains of women and girls in The Female Brain.
James Skrydlak
A very informative book, easy read and certainly helps you understand your male partner or any male you know.
YoungatHeart

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

279 of 354 people found the following review helpful By Tyro on April 15, 2010
Format: Hardcover
There've been plenty of books reexamining female physiology, and it seems fitting that it's men's turn. And sure, I'm curious the crazy things some men do. Why is Michel Gondry driven to make such lyrical, eccentric movies? Why did Bach think it was interesting to weave distinct melodies together in a fugue? Why did male physicists go to such lengths to find replicable ways of describing matter? Why was James Joyce so interested in the English language, its roots, its capacity for double meanings, its use and misuse? And what made Kant so sure that we possess "a priori" knowledge?

Sadly, relying on a posteriori knowledge, Dr. Louann Brizendine restricts herself to familiar obsessions about men's attitudes toward sex and women. She sees men as potentially quite impulsive when it comes to sex. However, she chides, men can and should learn to control their impulses. She certainly agrees with pop psychologists that men are less empathic than women.

Sure, it resembles cheesy self-help, but it's science. After all, men have a larger "sexual pursuit area" than women. Due to this and the effects of testosterone, men can go into a "man trance." Popular science writers draw these kinds of conclusions from the kind of fMRI studies Brizendine cites. These studies show brain activity under various conditions. Unfortunately, MRI studies are often not reliably replicable - results vary from time to time. Further, no one is really sure what brain activity in varying conditions means or what conclusions you can draw from it. Most good neurologists would be pretty cautious about making assertions based on such studies. Anyway, there is no such thing as a "sexual pursuit area" in men or anyone else. Oh - and "man trance" is an expression Dr. Brizendine made up.
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56 of 69 people found the following review helpful By George P. Wood TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 25, 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
When I told my wife I was reading The Male Brain, she laughed, "That's a short book." Others have joked about the anatomical location of the male brain. But in the companion volume to The Female Brain, Dr. Louann Brizendine demonstrates that the male brain is not simple, even if its thinking processes are closely tied to sex. The book is a real eye-opener into the current scientific understanding of how the male brain works, how it is tied to specific behaviors, and how it is different from women's brains. The study is not limited to the male brain, however. It also examines "neuro-hormone characters" such as testosterone, vasopressin, Mullerian inhibiting substance, and oxytocin, among others.

Interestingly, the brain and its neuro-hormones are not a static entity; they act and react dynamically as a man grows and develops from infancy to old age. At different stages of life, the brain and hormones play different roles in a man's life. And the influence of brain/hormonal activity is not one way. They influence male behavior, but they are also influenced by male behavior.

Apple has made the phrase, "There's an app for that," a byword. Regarding male behavior, we might say, "There's a complex brain/hormonal process for that." Whether it's sexual drive, territoriality, the protective instinct, or the problem-solving mode, what men do exists in a symbiotic relationship with what's going on in their brain.

As the parent of a male toddler, I read this book with keen interest, for it helped explain what is happening in my son's development as well as what will happen as he ages.

As a man with a philosophical bent, the book took me back to college discussion of the relationship between the mind and the brain as well as the possibility of free will.
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38 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Pletko on July 24, 2010
Format: Hardcover
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"[This book] draws on my twenty-five years of clinical experience as a neuropsychiatrist. It presents research findings from the advances over the past decade in our understanding of developmental neuroendocrinology, genetics, and molecular neuroscience. It offers samplings from neropsychlogy, cognitive neuroscience, child development, brain imaging, and psychoneuroendocrinology. It explores primatology, animal studies, and observation of infants, children, and teens, seeking insights into how particular behaviours are programmed into the male brain by a combination of NATURE and NURTURE."

The above comes from the author of 2006's "The Female Brain," Louann Brizendine, MD. She is a diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and is an endowed professor of clinical psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco [UCSF]. She's also founder and director of the Women's Mood and Hormone Clinic and co-director of the UCSF Program in Sexual Medicine.

Each chapter of this book covers some of her male patients at various stages in the life cycle. At every stage such as the mischievous child, the oversexed teen, the middle-aged man who falls for a younger woman, Brizendine gives a theory for how her patient's behaviour is caused by male brain patterns, aided considerably by hormones like testosterone (which she nicknames "Zeus") and vasopressin (the "White Knight").

Brizendine chooses patients who conform to a familiar stereotype and then explains their actions as the work of Zeus and his friends. The result is that her theory is very rigid (just as is the theory she presents in her 2006 book).

In the above quotation from the book, Brizendine promises to look into "NATURE and NURTURE.
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