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The Man Who Could Not Kill Enough: The Secret Murders of Milwaukee's Jeffrey Dahmer Hardcover – June 1, 1992


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 225 pages
  • Publisher: Citadel (June 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1559721170
  • ISBN-13: 978-1559721172
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,048,912 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Schwartz, the Milwaukee Journal reporter who first broke the Dahmer story of murder and cannibalism in July 1991, here presents a superficial account of the case. The book is redeemed only by the chapters detailing the impact of the crimes on the city and those showing the media responding to the sensationalism of the revelations in a kind of feeding frenzy. Especially unsatisfactory is the psychological analysis of Dahmer, which has little depth. Additionally, Schwartz is a writer of only average ability. Photos not seen by PW.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Dahmer strangled 17 young gay men (most of them black), sexually molested the corpses, then dismembered and photographed the bodies. He stored some of the heads in the freezer--others he boiled, bleached, painted, and kept as mementos. He was arrested in July 1991 when a potential victim managed to escape and reported the incident to the police. The Milwaukee Journal reporter who broke the story recounts Dahmer's background, details each of the murders, considers the divisive effects the case had on the city, and examines the role of the media in reporting sensational crimes. Schwartz's approach to this grisly material is straightforward, and her first-hand account of the process of covering the story of a lifetime is fascinating. She is less successful at drawing a convincing portrait of the killer, and her efforts at psychological analysis are perfunctory. The notoriety of this case will undoubtedly spawn more complete and insightful accounts, but in the meantime, this book will satisfy an immediate interest on the part of true-crime readers.
- Ben Harrison, East Orange P.L., N.J.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

Anne is a 26-year veteran print and broadcast journalist, author and a nationally recognized trainer on the subject of strategic communication and public relations for emergency management professionals. She served as Communications Director for the Milwaukee Police Department, developing and commanding the department's Office of Media & Communications for eight years under two police chiefs.

Anne was nominated for a 2013 Webby Award in the Government category for her work creating and developing MPD's website - a game-changer in how public safety agencies nationwide communicate with the public.

She co-authored, "Strategic Approaches to Improve Communications Initiative: A White Paper for Law Enforcement Executives" (October 2010) and "Strategic Communication: A Toolkit for Police Executives" (October 2011). She was contracted for these projects by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS). She subsequently provided training to police executives nationwide and in Canada on the communication strategies outlined in publications

In 1991, as a reporter for the former Milwaukee Journal, she broke the story of Milwaukee serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer and later wrote the definitive book on the case, "The Man Who Could Not Kill Enough: The Story of Milwaukee's Jeffrey Dahmer." The book was later made into a television movie.

Immediately before joining the Milwaukee Police Department, she served as Communications Director in the Wisconsin State Senate.

Anne is bilingual in Spanish and English. She is a founding member of the Public Affairs Committee for the Major Cities Chiefs organization, a committee formed to advise the country's major city Police Chiefs on public affairs issues. She also served as a Commissioner on the Milwaukee Commission on Police Community Relations.

Anne is an adjunct faculty member teaching executive messaging and strategic communication for public safety professionals at the Waukesha County Technical College. She provides training for the state's law enforcement through the Wisconsin Department of Justice Command College.

Customer Reviews

2.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Paul Cerra on December 10, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book was written by the Milwaukee Journal crime reporter who was the first reporter on the scene when Jeffrey Dahmer's personal slaughterhouse was revealed to the public on July 23, 1991. This book was published the following year and as such it doesn't have the benefit of time with which to look back on the murderer that shocked Milwaukee and the nation. Of course, Jeffrey Dahmer himself didn't have much time, either -- he was killed in prison in November 1994 by a delusional fellow inmate.
Dahmer's misdeeds are widely known, if only in part, but this book does bring forth the full horror in the very first chapter. Working the crime beat, Anne E. Schwartz, the wife of a cop who frequently got to go "under the yellow tape" for a closer look, was one of the few who actually got to stand in Dahmer's cramped, fetid apartment. Upon entering, she first noticed the general clutter and the trappings of a gay single man: potato chip bags, cigarette butts in an ashtray, and posters of muscular hunks adorning the walls. But she also couldn't help but notice the twisted and macabre additions that lurked in every room: a filing cabinet containing multiple human skulls, a scrapbook containing photos of partially dismembered corpses, containers of formaldehyde and chloroform, not to mention various bones and decomposing body parts. She knew this would be the case of a lifetime and in fact she was the one who broke the story.
Schwartz's carefully compiled narrative follows Dahmer from his younger days to the last eighteen months of his life before his arrest, a time he used to kill a dozen men. The book starts strong because the story is simply so shocking. But Schwartz has also spoken personally to many members of the victims' families.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By K. Pruitt on April 6, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I was interested for the first few chapters, and then completely lost interest, which is crazy because I find the whole Dahmer story very intriguing. She talks far too much about journalism and what the police went through rather than telling about what was going on with Dahmer during all this, and it just seemed to me like she was bragging about being a good journalist who was in with the cops and that she was married to one. It took me weeks to read it just because I kept having to force myself to go on reading about all these things when I just wanted to know more about the man himself. She went to far off topic, it read like an extremely long drawn out newspaper article, and I wouldn't recommend this book to anyone.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 20, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I would not recommend this book at all. It seems to me that this author used the book to brag that she's married to a cop and has an inside scoop on everything instead of using it to tell us the story of Dahmer. I have read many Dahmer books from different points of view and this one was my least favorite. I guess it's worth a read but be warned, it isn't the greatest Dahmer book there is.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Bradley F. Smith on July 5, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This manages to make Dahmer's macabre story boring by stiffly recounting the tale in chronological fashion. The writer, a cop's wife and a Milwaukee newspaper reporter who was first on the scene, doesn't really have the skill to write a full length book. She needed a ghost writer to make the facts come alive. It reads like a long and dull newspaper article. With so many better accounts on the market, don't bother with this one.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By David Nieves on November 22, 2008
Format: Hardcover
It appears that the author of this book benefited from her friendship with the local police in investigating and writing this book. I believe at the time she was involved (married or living with) a police officer and as such she sides way too much with the police department in defending their bungling of this case before Dahmer was finally arrested for his crimes. She also sugar coats the rampant racism that was the status quo at the police department before Dahmer's capture. I strongly disagree with her decision to publish the criminal records of Dahmer's victims as it give the appearance of blaming them somehow for their fate. While she did benefit slightly from the access she was allowed in providing details others could not, it can't make up for her lack of skill as a writer. It should be noted that after writing this book she went on to become the official spokesperson for the very same police department. If anyone knows of a really good book on this subject please share the title with me as this book left me quite unsatisfied.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Cashew Fan on October 6, 2008
Format: Hardcover
My time, and my dollar and nine cents could go to better use. Watching paint dry, perhaps with a cup of coffee. This book is a piece of one-off schlock by someone who obviously had her golden window of opportunity by "being popular" with the men in blue, and came to write this. The declining arc of her subsequent career moves leads me to wonder where her talent lay. Journalism? TV? Now she's spinning for the MPD. At least she gets to be in front of the camera from time to time. Good thing, too. She hasn't been able to pop out another book.
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