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The Man Paperback – December 1, 1999

117 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 768 pages
  • Publisher: I Books (December 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 067103894X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671038946
  • Product Dimensions: 6.2 x 2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (117 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #849,009 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 40 people found the following review helpful By DeWayneWhi@aol.com on September 29, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
So a book about the first black president. Well yes, but did you read Advice & Consent, a book about "the confirmation of a presidental appointment". The Man is very well written and gives us not only a story about the first black president, but an engaging look at what a "person on the outside" is like - his hopes (he is proud to be "An American"), his fears (don't shut the door if you are alone with a white woman), and how he copes (very well, but he doesn't know it). If you like "political stories", "intrigue stories", "Oh God, are there really people like this stories", or almost any other kind of story, READ IT. Of course I'm biased, I really liked it (the first six time I read it)! DeWayne White [DeWayneWhi@aol.com] PS: The reason for the review is I finally found another copy [I'd given away all I had], and I'm reading it for the seventh time.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
Should be edited further, but a gripping tale of power, and the paradoxical stupidity and grandness of human nature. A book that will ensure we try to judge people by the content of their character and not the colour of their skin.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By acousticj316@rocketmail.com on December 20, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
A novel of the highest integrity. Thoroughly enjoyed and hard to put down. Some of the narratives i.e speeches given by particular characters are brilliant and inspired. It is probably one the few novels I have read that I think deserve "10" . Interesting too that the novel was written in '65.
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24 of 29 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 14, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
When i first read Man, i had a burning desire to read it again and again. each of the characters evoke such strong feelings (both positive and negative) and yet do not seem hypothetical. i was moved by the editorial (on the occassion of the President's swearing in) wherein it cautions the citizens of usa that the new president is not under test but the nation is.
Douglas Dilman's constant anxieties about his ability to function as an effective president considering his racial background forms the central theme of the book. His impeachment trial and his subsequent vindication has all the ingredients of a thriller but still does not waver from the subtle portrayal of the different players of the game.
Dilman in his trial appearance counters a query on prejudices mentions that one can have positive prejudices like prejudice against racism. This created a paradigm shift in those of us who consider prejudice as a dirty word and would like to avoid it all costs.
an unputdownable book by any standards
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Frank on July 18, 2006
Format: Paperback
I picked this book up at Coldfoot Alaska, on a motorcycle trip to the northern end of the Alaska Pipeline, and was riveted by the book.

Despite being 887 pages long, and the fact that the "crisis" is long-telegraphed, the book is almost always a page-turner. In one sense, it takes us back to 1964, when a black president of the US would have been unwelcome by many.

Yet, the book presages the resignation of Nixon -- discussing when a President should resign -- and the impeachment of Clinton, who, like the fictional Dilman, was in large part accused of sexual misconduct.

Wallace deftly explores politics, personalities, ethics, and race relations in a divided nation.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Joseph A. Admire on September 8, 2011
Format: Paperback
Let's get the two main drawbacks of "The Man" out of the way first:

1) It's written in Irving Wallace's usual rather clunky style, full of trivia (he LOVED trivia of all sorts - this is the same guy who later wrote "The People's Almanac" and "The Book of Lists" with his son), and gets rather Anvilicious (to use a TV Tropes term I especially like) at times.

2) The book is very much a creature of its times, being written both at the height of the Civil Rights struggle and the Cold War, so much of the specific action comes across as being rather dated to today's 21st-century readers...though the subplot of the U.S. President trying to prevent hostile takeover of a remote but highly strategic Third World Nation in the face of substantial domestic opposition is strikingly resonant today.

Take both those minuses together, and it's worth the deduction of 1, more likely 1 1/2 stars.

*However*...this is still a highly worthwhile book, as being one of the first, if not the first, to seriously examine the accession of an African-American to the White House, what he would do and how the American public and the world at large would react. As another recent reviewer pointed out, there are definite parallels between the fictional Douglass Dilman and the real Barack Obama...oddly enough, both of them were relatively junior Midwestern Senators when they acceded to the Presidency, though in strikingly different circumstances (Dilman got the Presidency by default when the President, the Vice-President _and_ the Speaker of the House all died, two of them in the same catastrophic accident, and Obama was elected in the regular course of business), and both of them have had to cope with vehement, and substantial, domestic opposition.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By J. Mirkin on June 29, 2008
Format: Paperback
There is very little one can say about the pure power and audacity of this book. Written 42 years ago, it is truly amazing to look at the tableau of politics of the sixties without seeing both the stark contrast and the scary similarities of today's world. A must read for serious political fiction readers.
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